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Full text of "The Drift"

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FAIEVIEW 




A SHADY PATH 




BENEATH THE TREES 




A WOODLAND SCENE 







ALONG THE CANAL 




THE OLD TOW PATH 



BOARD CD 
DIRECTORS 



%^^r-A^"^^»-A^^#^4^^'HK i »^HtHi"#"aHiHiHk'a^t i *a iw #^ 







MR. HILTON U. BROWN, Grad. '£ 

President of the Board of Directors 
Since 1903 



Page Two 






























BOARD 
OF DIRECTORS 

John W. Atherton, Grad, '00, 

Indianapolis 

Executive and financial secretary of Butler 
University and Secretary of Butler Founda- 
tion. 

Crate Bowen, Ex. '94, Miami, Fla. 



Arthur V. Brown, Grad. '85, 

Indianapolis 

Chairman of athletic committee; Treasurer 
of Butler Foundation. 



Lee Burns, S. '93, 



Indianapolis 



Scot Butler, Grad. '68, 

Indianapolis 

John E. Canady, Indianapolis 



James L. Clark, 



Danville 



Perry H. Clifford, Grad. '89, 

Indianapolis 

Chairman of Shover Nursery school com- 
mittee. 



Clarence L. Goodwin, S. '83, 

Greensburg, Pa. 

Thomas W. Grafton, Grad. '80, 

Indianapolis 

























::• 









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William C. Irwin, Grad. '89, 

Columbus 

Vice-president of Board of Directors and 
President of Butler Foundation; Chairman 
of Building Committee. 

Emsley Johnson, Grad. '00, 

Indianapolis 

Member Alumni Endowment Committee. 



Arthur Jordan, Indianapolis 

Vice-chairman Building Committee. 

Henry Kahn, Ex. '81, Indianapolis 



Robert A. Long, Kansas City, Mo. 

Hugh Th. Miller, Grad. '88, 

Columbus 



Peter C. Reilly, 



Indianapolis 



William C. Smith, Grad. '84, 

Indianapolis 



Albert G. Snider, S. '96-'97, 

Indianapolis 



Mrs. Linnie I. Sweeney, 






Columbus 



THE OLD AND NEW BUTLER 

BY JEAN DAVIS 

From Fairview to Fairview might, traditionally speaking, summarize 
the history of Butler University; for the traditional roots of our college 
are in a small four-room structure near Falmouth, Indiana, at Fairview in 
Rush County. From the teachers of that academy was chosen, in part, 
the first faculty that Butler can claim as its own. From that limited 
source has risen a group that now includes eighty-three members who pre- 
side over the twenty-some-odd courses of instruction. 

The "Altisonant Letters" 

The "old grads" look back with pleasant reminiscences to that earliest 
faculty. Its members must have been like persons apart from their stu- 
dents. The first president was John Young, who presided over the school 
from 1855-1857. One of the most interesting was Professor Samuel K. 
Hoshour, its second president, a wonderful example of an old-fashioned 
scholar. Over six feet tall, he must have presented a commanding figure 
as he stalked into his classrooms attired in the long shawl which he pre- 
ferred to the conventional overcoat. His long solemn face belied his 
reputation as a wit. Known as a great linguist, he was as well versed in 
the classics as in the modern languages which he taught. He compiled a 
book of unusual words, known as the "ALTISONANT LETTERS," 
wheh is said to be one of the best of its kind ever written. At one of the 
Chapel services in the preparatory school of North Western Christian 
University, (which was Butler's name until 1877, when it was re-named to 
honor Ovid Butler, the father of President Scot Butler, and grandfather 
of our present Dean of Women, Miss Evelyn Butler), President Otis A. 
Burgess undertook to read to his students from this "ALTISONANT 
LETTERS." In the midst of the first page, he got "stuck" on one of 
these "high-sounding" words, and led his students in the merriment that 
followed his mistake. 

Of a different type from Hoshour was Allen R. Benton, who taught 
Greek Testament, Hebrew, and Political Economy at the same time he 
was president of the college, in '61-'68, and from '87-'91. His influence 




L e ft — North Western Christian 
University 



Right— Ovid Butler 




Page Five 



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on his students was great, particularly in the field of etiquette, for in a 
day when suave manners were the exception, his were polished. To this 
same worthy assemblage of North Western University belongs William 
Thrasher, a great mathematician. 

Professor R. T. Brown, a distant relative of our Mr. Hilton U. 
Brown, president of the Board of Directors, represented the type of pro- 
fessor who becomes absorbed in the technicalities of his subject to the 
exclusion of all else. It is said that one drowsy summer afternoon at 
North Western Christian University, all of his students slipped out of 
the window one by one, and left him droning chemistry into his long white 
beard; not until the end of the hour did he become conscious that his only 
audience was a long row of empty chairs. Another one of these "pre- 
Irvington" faculty was W. F. Black, president from 1870-'73. 

Dr. David Slarr Jordan 

Among the outstanding professors of that first year in Irvington, 
beginning September, 1875, was Dr. David Starr Jordan, now of Stanford 
University. At that time he was teaching Botany, and many are the tales 
told about him. It seems that a snake was as much at home in his pocket 
as a wild-flower, and that often while he was lecturing, one of these would 
stick out its head inquiringly, much to the alarm of the co-eds, and perhaps 
^ this in whispers, of course), of the "eds" as well! Himself a man of 
great physical strength, he thought nothing of taking his classes on ten 
mile botany hikes; on such journeys, Maywood was a favorite objective. 
In that day, the faculty often joined the students in a game of ball when 
no other opposing team was to be had, and Dr. Jordan was often seen 
enjoying this sport. 

The Early Irvington Campus 

It is this Butler of early Irvington days that offers the greatest con- 
trast with the Butler of today in every custom and tradition of collegiate 
life. Many traditions have survived, and many more have become a part 
of the student life; now they are to be moved to Fairview as part of the 
institution. The Administration building was for some time the only 
structure on the Irvington campus. This was followed in succession by the 
College Residence, Science Hall, the Gymnasium, the Engine House, and 



Left — "one drowsy summer af 
ternoon ... all his student: 
slipped out — " 



Right — "a snake was as much at 
home in his pocket — " 




















finally the Library which was built in memory of a Butler graduate, — 
Bona Thompson — by her parents when she died in Europe. Miss Kath- 
erine Merrill, who was first connected with the college at North Western, 
seems to have been the center about which the early student life revolved. 
Combining spirituality with a strong sense of fun, she meant a great deal 
to the young people about her. Although dignified, and undeniably 
"superior," she was easily approached, and through her ability to gain the 
confidence of the big gawky boys in her English classes, she could inject 
into them her own scorn of anything that approached unmanly behavior. 
She always set an example of high, noble conduct. At the old Downey 
home where she lived, now the Hibben home, Miss Merrill gave the occa- 
sional teas and salons that were then a feature of the college social life. 
The amusements of those days could not possibly be called strenuous, and 
were more or less confined to spelling matches and literary society meet- 
ings. For these occasions, there was no casual hailing of "the girl friend" 
by "May I have a date Friday night?" Indeed no! Even after the boy 
and girl had known each other some time, formal little notes were sent as 
invitations, beginning on his side: "My dear Miss Blank, May I have the 
pleasure of your company at the meeting of the Philokurian Society next 
Friday evening?" And from the girl, even if she were all eagerness, only 

a precise : "My dear Mr ...., I wish to accept with pleasure your kind 

invitation for next Friday evening. . . ." 

As there were no walks at school the first year the college spent in 
Irvington, "dating" during rainy weather was difficult. Planks were 
thrown across lots to the railroad tracks and woe be to the one who slipped 
off the straight and narrow. One of the chief outdoor sports was seeing 
if you could balance yourself on "no space at all" in order to walk beside 
your girl on a board "that was built just for one." One note-worthy case 
is on record where a fraternity man with a date was offered an umbrella 
by a rival Greek who was dateless. His astonishment was great for fra- 
ternity hostility in those days was so intense that it was patently expressed 
on all occasions. 

Fraternity Row 

Now that fraternity life has broadened out with seven national and 
two local men's fraternities on the campus and with twelve women's fra- 



Lcft — Old Downey Home 



Right — " 'dating' during rainy 
weather was difficult. 













wm 










Page Seven 









■ 









ternities, the situation is somewhat changed. Many of these organiza- 
tions are planning to build new homes in and about the campus at Fair- 
view. The minimum cost for such homes is to be twenty thousand dollars, 
and the maximum about sixty thousand. Men's fraternities which have 
bought building lots on the campus include Phi Delta Theta, Sigma Chi, 
Delta Tau Delta, and Sigma Nu. The women's organizations with 
similar plans are : Kappa Alpha Theta, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Pi Beta 
Phi, Delta Delta Delta, Zeta Tau Alpha, Alpha Delta Theta, Delta Zeta, 
Alpha Chi Omega, and Delta Gamma. Several organizations, among 
them Lambda Chi Alpha and Chi Rho Zeta, have bought lots away from 
the campus on which they expect to build their fraternity houses. Such 
fraternity houses will follow "Collegiate Gothic" architecture as to general 
plan, but they will show whatever individuality small variations may exact. 



The university architect, Mr. Thomas Hibben, visited Oxford and 
Cambridge to study the college buildings there as well as many campuses 
in this country. Jordan Memorial Hall, of English Gothic Architecture, 
is the first of the new academic structures to be erected; it will constitute 
three recitation halls in one, to be connected with towers. Close to Jordan 
Hall, and near the Boulevard, will be the Men's and Women's Dormi- 
tories, each housing one hundred and forty students. They are expected 
to be ready for occupancy by the beginning of the 1928 fall semester. 
Opposite Jordan Hall will be the three other buildings which will be used 
doubtlessly for the Chapel, the Library, and the College of Religions. 
Between these two sets of buildings, and facing Forty-sixth street will be 
the Administration building. In keeping with the English-Gothic style of 
architecture, the building materials are of Salisbury Granite, (imported 
from England) and of Indiana Limestone. Even the proposed engine 
house will conform architecturally with the other structures. 

The Campus Site 

Mr. George Kessler, who before his recent death selected the sites 
for the new buildings, stated: "I believe Butler has the most beautiful site 
for a campus of any University." It is fitting that the ground selected 
should be typically "Hoosier" in its topography; its sloping hills, its 



Left — Butler Home 



Right — A Fraternity House C~*n | - 




-?-:^. 




§** 









Tage Eight 









water-ways, and its green meadows are reminiscent of any Indiana land- 
scape. Nothing is to mar the beauty of the landscaped grounds. Some 
practical-minded persons have remonstrated, "But you have to have rail- 
roads to bring your coal to the Power house." However, that difficulty 
has been eliminated; it is planned to float the coal down White River on 
barges. The city is planning a park system which will include boulevards 
around the canal and White River. In addition to the trees planted in this 
park system, Butler is to have Botanical gardens, an herbarium, and an 
arboretum. 

The nomenclature of the streets forms an interesting item. In Irv- 
ington the streets were named either after some illustrious literary figures 
or early Irvington residents. Consequently we have our "Emerson" and 
our "Downey" avenues. Fairview, however, seemingly in keeping with 
the whole architectural layout, has such names as "Sunset Avenue" and 
"Buckingham Drives" for its streets. 

Everything about the new Butler is to be orderly. Unlike some uni- 
versities which have had to tear down old buildings in order to have sites 
for new ones, all the buildings at Butler have been planned systematically. 
The campus will be laid out like a model city. Plans are made for con- 
structing a building a year over a period of fifty years. 

Athletic Plant 

Butler's Athletic plant will occupy forty of Butler's 264 acres. The 
plant will include the field house, the gymnasium and the stadium, which 
will hold 30,000 persons and can be enlarged to hold 72,000. The sta- 
dium is expected to be completed for the football games at the beginning 
of the fall season, and will be "up to the last minute" in every detail. We 
shall at last be able to greet Illinois fellow students "in the style in which 
they have been accustomed" — to use the phraseology of the day. 

The athletic plant has been financed by a corporation of forty-one 
prominent business men. The Athletic Committee of the Board of Trus- 
tees is composed of John W. Atherton, Will G. Irwin, Hilton U. Brown, 
Arthur Jordan, Emsley Johnson, Arthur V. Brown, and Peter C. Reilly. 
The committee which has made possible the new field house includes Will 
Irwin, John W. Atherton, Hilton U. Brown, Arthur Jordan, Emsley John- 
son, and William C. Smith. At the opening of the new field house at 
















• 



Page Nine 



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^ft-ft^ll^fl^ft^-tt^-ll-ft-A^^fr-ft'^-A^^-m^^ft-JI-A^'-'^A^tt"^ 



the Butler-Notre Dame game, Mr. Arthur V. Brown expressed the senti- 
ments of this committee when he stated, in part: "No college of any pre- 
tensions in these days can omit athletic features for the reason that a 
sound and healthy body accompany an active mind. We believe that this 
building is the last word in convenience and utility of construction. In 
fact, we are told that there is in this country no similar building of as 
large a capacity or superior construction." Mr. Brown paid tribute to the 
untiring efforts of John W. Atherton, the financial secretary, "whose 
undaunted efforts have made this whole Butler program possible." 

Affiliated Schools 

In another way, Butler has been extending its facilities to the advan- 
tage of its students. Affiliations have been made with the John Herron 
Art School, the Metropolitan School of Music, the Indianapolis Teachers' 
College, the Indiana College of Music and Fine Arts, and the Clare 
Ann Shover Nursery School, which is part of the department of 
education under Professor Richardson; it acts as a laboratory for pros- 
pective primary teachers. This arrangement enables students to specialize 
in subjects not offered in Butler's academic course, and at the same time 
to take such courses as will enable them to receive a degree from Butler 
University. This is particularly desirable for those who wish to teach, as 
it offers them the advantage of college life with the opportunity for study- 
ing the latest local developments in their chosen line of study. The 
Indiana Law School was the first school to form any association with 
Butler. Butler women students also have the privilege of taking some of 
their gymnasium work at the Y. W. C. A. and at some of the Athletic 
Clubs. 

Butler City Office 

Few people, even Butler students, know that besides the administra- 
tive office in Irvington, Butler maintains an office downtown on the 
eleventh floor of the Fletcher Savings and Trust Building. At this office, 
Mr. John W. Atherton, Executive Secretary of the University, and 
Mr. Wm. C. Irwin, its assistant treasurer, conduct the financial affairs of 
the University. 

From this office recently came an interesting financial statement. 
Butler now has total assets of over $4,500,000. This sum includes the 
valuation of the ground and plant at Irvington, the one at Fairview, sev- 
eral student loan funds, endowment funds — in other words, all the assets, 
new and old, of Butler University. The endowment to date is $1,700,000. 

Such figures show how greatly the institution has grown from its 
beginnings in 1850 when the Indiana Legislature granted it a charter. 
The funds for that first Butler, known as North Western Christian Uni- 
versity, were subscribed by citizens of Indiana and by members of the 
Christian Church. As a preparatory school it opened its first session in 
1853. The college of Liberal Arts was opened November 1, 1855, and 
has been in continuous existence ever since. Other presidents of the Uni- 
versity, not mentioned previously have been Harvey W. Everest, Scot 
Butler, and Winifred E. Garrison. 










AEIfffCIENCEl 



■jOeSe, 



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GET LEARNING 

A little learning is a dangerous thing; 
Drink deep, or taste not the Pierian Spring; 
There shallow draughts intoxicate the brain, 
And drinking largely sobers us again. 

"The university is a place of learning with many 
.open paths to the Pierian Spring. The paths invite 
you, but the drinking you must do for yourself. If 
all Butler men and women would freely go to the 
spring and deeply drink, they would become powerful 
in combating evil and in preserving and extending the 
best in Christian civilization." 

ROBERT J. ALEY 
President of Butler University 
Page Twelve 









FACULTY 

Robert Judson Aley, Ph. D. 

President Butler University 



ames William Putnam, Ph. D. 

Dean and Vice-President. Professor of 
Economies and Business Administration 



Evelyn Mitchell Butler, A. M. 

Dean of W omen and Demia Butler Profe 
of English Literature 

Henry Lane Bruner, Ph. D. 

Professor of Zoology 



Elijah Newton Johnson, A. M., 
M. S., D. Sc. 

Professor of Mathematics and Treasurer 

Catharine Merrill Graydon, A. M. 

Professor of English Literature 



Henry Mills Gelston, A. B., LL. D. 

Professor of Classical Languages and 
Archeology 

Elijah Jordan, Ph. D. 

Professor of Philosophy 



Milton D. Baumgartner, Ph. D. 

Professor of Germanic Languages 

John Smith Harrison, Ph. D. 

Professor of English 



William Leeds Richardson. Ph. D. 

Professor of Education, Head of Department 
of Education 

Guy Howard Shadinger, Ph. D. 

Professor of Chemistry 















~A~A~«~a~A~A~A~4' 



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Gino Arturo Ratti, A. M. 

"Docteur de I'Universite de Grenoble" 
(Ph. D.) Professor of French and Head 
of the Department of Romance Languages 

Howard Eikenberry Jensen, Ph. D. 

Professor of Sociology 



Pail Leland Ha worth, Ph. D. 

Professor of History 

James A. Rohbach, A. M., LL. D. 

Lecturer in Business Law 



Seth Earl Elliott, M. S. 

Professor of Physics 

Ray Clarence Friesner, Ph. D. 

Professor of Botany 



George Clark, B. S. 

Director of Physical Education and Athletics 
for Men 

Thor Griffith Wesenberg, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Romance Languages 



Ida B. Wilhite, B. S. 

Associate Professor of Home Economics 

Claude Sifritt, A. M. 

Associate Professor of Public Speaking 



Amos B. Carlile, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Education 

Janet Malcolm MacDonald, Ph. D. 

Associate Professor of Classical Languages 
and Archeology 



i 












Alice Bidwell Wesenberg, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor of English 

Sarah Elizabeth Cotton, A. B. 

Examiner and Registrar 



Pleasant K. Hightower, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor of Education 

Juna Marie Lctz, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor of Mathematics 



A. Dale Beeler, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor of History 

Albert Mock, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor of Education 



Charles Mervin Palmer, M. S. 

Assistant Profrssor of Botany 

Allegra Stewart, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor of English 



Sarah Hill Baumgartner, A. B. 

Assistant Professor of Grrman 

Nathan Everett Pearson, Ph. D. 

Assistant Profrssor of Zoology 



DeForest O'Dell, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor and Artlng Hrad of the 
Department of Journalism 

Margaret Emilie Bruner, A. M. 

Assistant Profrssor of Homr Eronomics 
























Gladys Lillian Banes, Ed. M. 

Assistant Professor of Mathematics 

Florence I. Morrison, A. M. 

Assistant Professor of Romance Languages 



Russell Gesberg Weber, M. S. 

Assistant Professor of Zoology 

Lee O. Garber, M. S. 

Assistant Professor of Education 



Stanley Adair Cain, M. S. 

Assistant Professor of Botany and Curator 
of Herbarium 

Marie Cousin, 

Instructor in French 



Hazel Whisenand, A. B. 

Instructor in Spanish 

Mary Syfers McBride, A. M. 

Instructor in English 



Emily Mathjlde Helming, A. B. 

Instructor in English 

Esther Asenath Renfrew, A. M. 

Instructor in Romance Languages 



Herbert Ralston Hill, A. B. 

News Editor, Indianapolis News and In- 
structor in Journalism 



May Kolmer Schaeff.r, A. M. 

Instructor in Zoology 












+~&~*~*~a»&~i~&~&'*&~i\~*~*~&~&~&"&~&~&~&~&~&~*~ t 









• 



Evelyn Henderson Fife, A. B. 

Instructor in Public Speaking 

Mabel F. Arbuthnot, A. M. 

Instructor in Latin 



Juliana M. Thorman, A. B. 

Instructor in German 

George A. Schumacher, A. M. 

Instructor in English 



John Egbert Frazeur, A. B. 

Instructor in Romance Languages 

Reginald Hood Scott, A. B. 

Instructor in Economics 



Nathan G. Carder, A. M. 

Instructor in English 

Martha Oliver Daugherty, A. M. 

Instructor in English 



Hersel W. Hudson, M. S. 

Instructor in Economics 

Frank Richards Hall, A. M. 

Instructor in History 



J. Douglas Perry, A. B. 

Instructor in Journalism 

Sarah Sisson, A. M. 

Instructor in English 



^MMMMfr 1 " 







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James B. Vandaworker, 

Director of Band 

Louise Marguerite Schulmeyer, 

Director of Physical Education for Women 



Paul D. Hinkle, B. S. 

Assistant Athletic Director 

Robert Linville Nipper, A. B. 

Assistant in Athletics 



Violet Katherine Beck, A. B. 

Assistant in German 

Jean Wilhemini Mander, A. B. 

Assistant in Romance Languages 



Bernice Gertrude Giltner, A. B. 

Assistant in Romance Languages 

Dorothy Lucile Hauss, A. B. 

Assistant in Romance Languages 



Charles W. Wilson, 

Secretary 

R. Kent Dorman, B. S. 

Assistant to the Secretary 



Mildred B. Durbin, A. B. 

Assistant Registrar 

Eleanor A. Hester, 

Secretary to the President, Secretary of 
Teachers Placement, and Director of Stu- 
dent Employment 






••-•~«~W~W~*~»-«~«-t~*~»~t~«~«''% 



COLLEGE 




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COLLEGE OF RELIGION 

I HE College of Religion was established as one of the constituent 
colleges of Butler University by action of the Butler Board of Directors 
in the Spring of 1924. The college, while under the control and manage- 
ment of the University Board, is directly administered by a Dean and 
Faculty of its own, acting under the immediate supervision of the Church 
Committee of the Butler University Board of Directors. It has its own 
special endowment fund. 

The college first opened in September, 1925, occupying quarters in 
the old Butler plant at Irvington. It will move as speedily as possible 
to its new location at Fairview. During the session of 1927-28 the college 
occupied class and office rooms in the College of Missions building, 
adjacent to the Butler Campus. 

Open to students of all religious faiths on equal terms, the purpose of 
the College of Religion is primarily to train men and women for the 
Christian ministry. 

The College of Religion began its first session with a matriculation 
list of thirty-eight students, which was increased to forty-eight at the 
close of the year 1925-26. Of this number, forty-two were men and six 
were women. There were twelve graduates and thirty-six undergraduates. 
The matriculation for the second year, 1926-27, numbered eighty-four, 
including seventy-three men and eleven women. The graduate students 
numbered fifteen and the undergraduates sixty-nine. The enrollment 
for 1927-28 is ninety-eight, including seventy-one men and seventeen 
women. Of this number fifteen are graduates and eighty-three under- 
graduates. 



Page Twenty 



Faculty and Student Group of the College of Religion 



* 






I* 













.ff~V M |MMMMMMMMMMMM -*** 



COLLEGE OF 









RELIGIONS FACULTY 






*l 



? 



Frederick D. Kershner, M. A., 
LL. D. 

Dean of the College of Religion and Pro- 
fessor of Christian Doctrine 

Bruce L. Kershner, M. A. 

Clarence L. Goodwin Professor of New 
Testament Language and Literature 



G. I. Hoover, B. D., A. M. 

Professor of Practical Theology; General 
Secretary of the Indiana Christian Mis- 
sionary Association 

Thomas W. Grafton, A. B., A. M. 

Chaplain of University, Professor of Prac- 
tical Theology 



Morris M. Feuerlicht, Rabbi; 
B. H. L.;A. B. 

Professor of Scmitics 

Everard Roy Moon, A. M., B. D., 
D. D., F. R. G. S. 

Professor of Missions 



William F. Bacon, B. D. 

Instructor in Old Testament and Scmitics 

Toyoza Wada Nakari, A. M. 

Instructor in Old Testament and Scmitics 



Tolbert F. Reavis, M. A. 

Professor of Church History 

Alfred T. DeGroot, A. M. 

Secretary to Dean Kershner 







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Salttr-%«fitlq « --• 



COLLEGE OF RELIGION BUILDING 
To be erected on the new Butler campus at Fairview 






Page Twenty-two 






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ART ASSOCIATION OF INDIANAPOLIS INDIANA 

ART SCHOOL 

OF THE JOHN HERRON ART INSTITUTE 

PENNSYLVANIA AND SIXTEENTH STREETS 

FINE ARTS 

^TUDENTS of the Art School of the John Herron Art Institute have 
the opportunity of studying with the best of Indiana artists. The in- 
struction is supplemented by constant contact with the exhibitions and 
objects of art shown in the Art Museum. In every community there 
exists a group of young people who, through the love of the beautiful, 
desire to obtain a training which will enable them either to express that 
love in some definite form, or to appreciate more keenly the expression of 
others. The Fine Arts Department of the Art School aims to give a 
thorough training in drawing and painting from the figure and landscape. 
Personal attention is given each student and encouragement given by bring- 
ing him in contact with more mature groups of artists and collectors of art. 
This course prepares a student to pursue his career with confidence. It 
then remains for him to find the thing he can do best, or the thing that 
appeals to him most, in order that he may do creative work that will 
develop patronage and build up individual reputation. 

LECTURES 

Lectures on the history of painting and sculpture, as well as composi- 
tion and other art subjects, are included in the work of the Fine Arts De- 
partment. 

Students who are working for a baccalaureate degree at Butler Uni- 
versity may take fourteen semester hours work at the Art School in the 
Fine Arts Department. This elective work must be distributed as follows: 
Not more than four hours in history and appreciation of art, and not 
more than ten hours in studio work. 






n 






41 







Page Twenty-four 






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a 

MUSEUM 

Art patrons in the city have watched with interest the growth of the 
school since several members of the Art Association in 1891 took over the 
private art school established by William Forsyth and T. C. Steele. They 
later, with the help of John Herron in 1897, organized the present John 
Herron Art Institute. 

One of the great assets of the school is the Museum, which is open 
to all students. A valuable collection of paintings, sculpturing and objects 
of art collected throughout the world is maintained. A library located in 
the Museum contains 2,800 volumes on art besides current art periodicals 
and literature of interest to art students. 



4! 



COMMERCIAL ART 

The picture on this page shows the members of the Commercial Art 

Class preparing the drawings reproduced in this edition of the Drift. 

These students attend both Butler University and the Art School. The 

course is planned to give the students a comprehensive knowledge of 

present-day conditions in the field of commercial art and a knowledge of 

the processes of reproduction. A valuable feature of this course is the 

opportunity a student has in studying with professional men who are in 

touch with every day problems of the commercial world. 

^1 

NEW BUILDING 

An anonymous gift from a friend of the Art Association has made 
possible the erection of a new building for the art school. Of fire proof 
construction, the new building will be faced with brick to harmonize with 
the museum. It is hoped to have the structure (which will provide for 
250 students) ready for occupancy early next year. Paul Philippe Cret, 
Philadelphia, is the architect. He designed the Indianapolis Public Library. 



Sfr 



Left to Right: 

Marcia Clapp, Jane 
Willis, Dorothy Hel- 
mer, Mary Louise 
Haugh, Earl Beyer, 
La Vonne Burns, 
Claude Leet, Jane 
Messick, (art editor) 




Page Twenty-five 



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TEACHERS' TRAINING 

Increasing demand among teachers of drawing in public and private 
schools for an opportunity to acquire a college degree and to have pro- 
fessional training in art schools has resulted in an arrangement between 
the Art School of the John Herron Art Institute and Butler University by 
which it is possible to secure credit toward a Fine Arts Degree. The 
curriculum is so arranged that students may attend Butler for academic 
credits and the Art School for art subjects. 

A training school is conducted in the Art School on Saturdays in 
which the students teach under the observation of a critic. Opportunities 
for observation in the public schools are also furnished. The Teachers' 
Training department not only gives instruction in methods of teaching, 
but also a thorough training in drawing and painting, design and other 
subjects included in the Fine Arts Course. The spirit of cooperation is 
constantly kept in mind, and the student teachers are taught to so plan 
their work that it will be of interest to teachers who are conducting classes 
in History, English and other subjects taught in the grade and high schools. 

Each year a pageant is given at the Art Institute. Members of the 
Teachers' Training Department assist in designing both the setting and 
the costumes and take charge of certain episodes. This experience is very 
valuable because art teachers in many schools are called upon to assist in 
such productions in secondary and grade schools. 












ALUMNI ASSOCIATION 



Membership in the Alumni Art Association is extended to all grad- 
uates of the Art School. William Forsyth, long connected with Butler 



is to strengthen the bonds of fellowship formed in undergraduate days 
This is done by sponsoring a sketch class every Saturday afternoon and 
banquets on various occasions. 




Art Students 
at Work 



Page Twenty-six 



£ 



affairs, is Honorary President of this body. The ideal of the association 



















Mrs. Henry Schurmann 
President 



INDIANA COLLEGE OF MUSIC 
AND FINE ARTS 

Meridian at Sixteenth Street 

INDIANA College of Music and Fine Arts was established in 1907 by 
Oliver Willard Pierce, an eminent concert pianist and teacher. From the 
beginning he endowed the College with superior standards and personal- 
ities, and, through the years that have passed since its founding, the school 
has never lost this valuable and distinguishing asset. 

In 1923 the College was reorganized under the direction of Mrs. 
Blanche Harrington. The school was soon placed on a basis to meet the 
larger educational requirements that were developing in the music world. 
Added to Mrs. Harrington's directorate were Mrs. Henry Schurmann as 
president, Mr. Arthur W. Mason as director, Mr. Arthur Jordan, 



14 







Blanche Harrington 
Secretary and Treasurer 



Arthur W. Mason 
Director 



Arthur Jordan 

Member of Executive and 

Advisory Committees 

Page Twenty-seven 









It 



« 






• 









Lenora Coffin, Bomar Cramer, Glenn Friermood, Flora Lyons, Pasquale 
Montani and Ferdinand Schaefer. 

Mrs. Schurmann's wide recognition as a musical authority of ex- 
ceptional discernment, appreciation and executive experience brings the 
school into closer relations with local and state musical affairs as well as 
with the National Federation of Music activities. 

Mr. Mason, piano teacher of wide experience, is a leading authority 
on public school music and an organizer of educational work. 

Mr. Jordan, who has shown much interest in both educational and 
musical affairs, is on the Board of Directors of both Butler University 
and the Indiana College of Music and Fine Arts. 

The members of the faculty are artists and teachers of high standing 
in their particular lines of work, taking a personal interest in the advance- 
ment of their students. 

"CURRICULUM" 

The curriculum has been extended and expanded to keep pace with 
the progress of other ranking institutions, the educational credit rating 
with other schools being fully established. The Public School Music 
department offers a four year course leading to the degree of Bachelor 
of Music, which is accredited in Indiana and other states. Courses lead- 
ing to certificates, diplomas, artist diplomas and degrees are offered in 
all departments. Languages, dramatic art and dancing are included as 
separate departments. A careful supervision of students is maintained 
during their musical progress. 

Early in 1927 Butler University and the Indiana College of Music 
and Fine Arts entered into an affiliation which affords the two schools 
closer cooperation. By this arrangement students of both schools are 
given an exceptional opportunity for training in music, the arts and 
sciences. Educational subjects are taught by members of the Butler faculty. 




Faculty of 

Indiana School 

of Music 



» 



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I* 






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Page Twenty-eight 









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Pflge Twenty-nine 













Mrs. Emma Lieber 
Director 






*4 



CLAIRE ANN SHOVER NURSERY SCHOOL 

3265 North New Jersey 

^^/LAIRE Ann Shover Nursery School became affiliated with Butler 
University September 1928. Butler is one of the few schools in the 
country with a nursery school as a part of its educational department. 
The purpose of the school is to provide a place where the small children 
of people of moderate means can have scientific care, cheerful surround- 
ings and happy companionship. Mrs. Emma Lieber is in charge of the 
nursery school, but the direction is under Dr. W. L. Richardson. His 
colleagues and students have access to the nursery school at all times. 

The school was named for Claire Ann Shover, a resident of Indian- 
apolis for many years, from whom a bequest made possible its beginning. 
The home in which this nursery school is located has large sunny rooms, 
an inclosed open air play-ground and a large porch. Children from two 
to five years of age are cared for every day except Saturday, Sunday, 
and holidays, from the hours of 9:30 A. M. until 4:30 P. M. They are 
under the constant and expert care of trained child workers. The 
schedule for the day includes playing-out-doors whenever possible — with 
sand, kiddie cars, bean bags, drawing, modeling and block building. 
Group work consists of songs, stories, song games, simple dance games 
and rhythmic activities are added to the play. Emphasis is placed on the 
development of good habits, such as obedience, attention, self-dependence, 
helpfulness and cooperation. Play is followed by a short rest before 
dinner, which is served at 12:30; then follows a rest period of two hours 
in quiet, well-ventilated rooms — then another romp out-doors. The meals 
are planned by an expert dietitian, and special attention is given to the 
cultivation of health habits as related to food, play, and rest. 

Such a nursery school is of great value to students taking teacher- 
training because of the opportunity to study various child problems of pre- 
school age, and parents are usually interested because they can see in the 
Claire Ann Shover Nursery School an opportunity for scientific training 



of small children. 

Page Thirty 






& 






H 




Edward Nell 
Director 






Mi 



METROPOLITAN SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Pennsylvania at North Street 



METROPOLITAN School of Music is the oldest music school in the 
state of Indiana, being founded in 1895. The aims and ideals of its 
founders were to create in pupils a desire for knowledge and develop this 
desire by education along broad lines and surrounded by a musical atmos- 
phere; and to obtain the best results in the shortest possible time while 
maintaining the highest of standards. 

From a small beginning the Metropolitan School of Music has grown 
until today it is one of the largest and most active music schools in Indiana. 
Its pupils and graduates are found in nearly every town and county of the 
state, and many have attained national reputation and eminence. 

The school offers a concise and thorough course in musical and 
dramatic instruction. It is practical and comprehensive in nature and 
taught by modern and approved methods. 



Left — Hugh McGieeny, 
Director 



Right — Leslie E. Peck, 
Director 











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Page Thirty-one 



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DIRECTORS 

A board of directors — composed of Edward Nell, Hugh McGibeny 
and Leslie E. Peck — administers the interests of the school. Combining 
their interests and efforts toward its artistic growth, they have by their 
own individual work and instruction of students contributed much to the 
school's progress. 

AFFILIATION 

The Metropolitan School of Music is cooperating with Butler 
University primarily for the purpose of preparing teachers and super- 
visors for all grades of public school work. Through this affiliation, 
which was instituted May 13, 1924, academic courses are given both at 
Butler and the Metropolitan by Butler faculty members, while courses in 
applied and theoretical music are given at the music school. Allegra 
Stewart, assistant professor of English, and A. B. Carlile, associate 
professor of Education — both of the Butler University faculty — have 
conducted classes at the Metropolitan during the past year for the con- 
venience of music students. 

FACULTY 

The faculty of the Metropolitan is composed of artistic teachers who 
are most carefully chosen and who have proved themselves capable of 
pleasing, holding, advancing and stimulating the interest of those students 
placed under their guidance. This necessitates a number of years of suc- 
cessful experience on the part of each faculty member. The degree of 
success demonstrated by the achievements of Metropolitan students in the 
realm of music shows the wisdom of this method of selection. 

CENTRAL AND NORTH SCHOOL 
The central building of the Metropolitan School of Music was erected 
by its Board of Directors and is used exclusively by the school. There 
are a number of classrooms for lectures and small recitals spacious enough 
to accommodate one hundred pupils or more. This building is situated 
at the corner of Pennsylvania and North Streets. The North Branch of 
the Metropolitan is located at the corner of Pennsylvania and Thirty- 
fourth Streets. 







Faculty of 

Metropolitan 

School of Music 



Page Thirty-two 



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MUSIC. A L FRATERNITIES 

A chapter of Mu Phi Epsilon, honorary musical sorority, is located 
at the Metropolitan School of Music. This organization is intended to 
encourage and stimulate musical activity by providing a means of closer 
association of young artists. New members are chosen on the basis of 
musical talent and ability. 

Alpha Sigma chapter of Phi Mu Alpha Sinfonia fraternity, national 
honorary musical organization for men is also located at the Metropolitan. 
Its motive is to encourage and stimulate music students and musicians by 
a closer bond of fellowship. Also, the fraternity is organized for the 
advancement of American Music and musicians. 

A number of members of both fraternities are students or former 
students of Butler University. 

THE ODEON 

The Central Building contains the school's concert hall — The 
Odeon — which has a seating capacity of 450 and is used for lectures, 
concerts, recitals, receptions, and assemblies. The stage is large enough 
to permit the presentation of plays and operas and has only recently been 
refitted with a new curtain and scenery. The Odeon, with the exception 
of the professional theatres, has the best equipped stage of its kind in 
Indianapolis, thus affording an unusual advantage to the dramatic de- 
partment of the school. 

CONSOLIDATION 

The growth of the two music schools affiliated with Butler University 
(the Metropolitan School of Music and the Indiana College of Music and 
Fine Arts) has been so rapid that plans have been formulated for their 
consolidation. Under this arrangement, which calls for the erection of 
a new and modern building in the near future, it is hoped to accommodate 
music students more efficiently by giving them the advantages of a large 
metropolitan school of music. 



Odeon Hall 




•m 



Page Thirty-three 



I* 

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**a~4 




TEACHERS COLLEGE OF INDIANAPOLIS 

Alabama at Twenty-third 

| EACHERS College of Indianapolis, which is one of the five schools 
affiliated with Butler University, is accredited with having trained more 
teachers holding elementary licenses than any other Indiana College. Its 
growth has been considerable during the past few years, having an enroll- 
ment in the past year of 1,403. The summer school of 1927 was attended 
by 596 student teachers. The college prepares teachers for all of the 
elementary grades. A practical example of what its work can accomplish 
is seen by results obtained in the Jackson Graded School, which is main- 
tained by the College and has pupils enrolled from the kindergarten to 
the eighth grade. 

LECTURES 
Prominent educators from various parts of the country have ad- 
dressed the student-teachers of the College during the past year. Among 
these were: Dr. Mary Dabney Davis, head of the nursery-kindergarten- 




Model 
Kindergarten 



Page Thirty- fou 


















primary department of the United States Bureau of Education; Dr. 
Frederick G. Bonser, professor of education at Columbia University; Miss 
Annie E. Moore, and Dr. Emma Grant Meader, also of the education 
department of Columbia University. In January President Alice Corbin 
Sies called a conference of prominent educators of the state for a study 
of problems in curriculum revision. 

STUDENT COUNCIL 
Ten student leaders now form a president's council which confers 
with President Sies on matters pertaining to student affairs. Thus the 
students are given a voice in administering their own problems. 

JOURNALISM 

With the appearance of the "Collegiate," the college newspaper 
which is published every two weeks, considerable interest has been aroused 
in journalism among the prospective teachers. It was largely through 
this effort that the Press Association of Indiana Normal Colleges, which 
Prof. DeForrest O'Dell advocated and addressed, was organized at the 
Teachers College this year by student representatives of state normal 
colleges. 

Other student organizations which have been formed recently are a 
scholastic club, the Beau Brummell Club, the Athletic Association and the 
Dramatic Club. The College reaches the radio listener's ear every Thurs- 
day evening when it broadcasts over W. F. B. M. 

ENDOWMENT FUND 

An endowment fund for the Teachers College of Indianapolis is 
being sought by former students of the college. This endowment is to 
be known as the Eliza A. Blaker Memorial Endowment in memory of 
Dr. Eliza Blaker, who founded the Teachers College in 1882. Miss 
Emma Colbert, dean of the Teachers College, is general chairman in 
charge of the campaign, and Virgil F. Binford, business administrator, is 
endowment manager. 

! w^—nJlF- HEaiS SftiiMtir 

A Group of Jniafl - si ^E^^^V^E? 11 

Students V/iH \ Bmss^^BH 

j. mSS EsUa^BV 

HI U m 



Page Thirty-five 









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* 



HISTORICAL 

/^LMONG the members of the Indianapolis Bar who were 
instrumental in the organization of the Indiana Law School 
were Byron K. Elliott, William P. Fishback, dean of the School 
until 1901; John R. Wilson, Addison C. Harris, John G. Wil- 
liams, Charles W. Fairbanks and William C. Bobbs, publisher. 
In addition to these members of the bar, the faculty included 
Charles W. Moores, Augustus L. Mason, William F. Elliott, 
John L. Griffiths and later Henry M. Dowling, Charles F. Coffin, 
Louis B. Ewbank and other well known members of the bar. In 
the summer of 1899, James A. Rohbach, who had been a mem- 
ber of the faculty of the Law School of the State University 
of Iowa for seven years, was requested to reorganize the 
School, putting it on the modern basis of the case 
and class instruction method. In 1901 
Mr. Rohbach became Dean 
of the School. 



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INDIANA LAW SCHOOL 

Columbia Securities Building 
Delaware at Ohio 



INDIANA Law School was organized in 1894 for the purpose of giving 
the law students of the middle west an opportunity to acquire a more 
thorough and systematic knowledge of the law than has heretofore been 
afforded them by any institution within easy reach of their homes. The 
success attending the past thirty-four years has been highly encouraging. 



The faculty of the School has been selected from outstanding and 
specially qualified members of the profession actively engaged in the 
practice of law. The present faculty is composed of Dean Rohbach, Noble 
C. Butler, William G. White, James M. Ogden, Fremont Alford, L. Roy 
Zapf, Robert N. Fulton, Howard W. Adams, Harry C. Hendrickson, 
John W. Kern and Louis B. Ewbank, special lecturer. 

ASSOCIATION WITH BUTLER 

In the years 1899 and 1921, the Indiana Law School experienced 
considerable changes in its scope and development. The School became 
a part of the University of Indianapolis in 1899, and in 1921 it was closely 
associated with Butler University. By this latter association the student 
may complete the required course of study for a Bachelor of Arts or 
Science degree at Butler University and the required course of study for 
the degree of Bachelor of Laws from the Indiana Law School in six years. 
Many students are availing themselves of this opportunity. 

LOCATION 

The Indiana Law School is happily situated. The city of Indian- 
apolis is a recognized center of unusual opportunity. Situated near the 
center of population of the United States, its cultural, commercial and 
educational advantages are many. All of the State courts (from the 

Page Thirty-seven 



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Supreme Court to that of the lowest jurisdiction) as well as the United 
States Circuit and District Courts are in almost continuous session during 
the school year. The value to the student of the knowledge of court 
procedure thus procured cannot be underestimated. He not only learns 
routine court practices, but also the manner of cross-examination of wit- 
nesses and the practical application of rules governing the admission of 
evidence and the methods of its introduction. Thus, the student is 
afforded opportunities of observing and studying trial methods and styles 
of argument of prominent lawyers from all parts of the country as they 
are brought here by litigation. 



The School maintains a good working library, consisting of the 
Indiana Reports, the American Decisions, American Reports, American 
State Reports, Lawyers' Reports Annotated, American and English En- 
cyclopedia of Law, Encyclopedia of Pleading and Practise, Encyclopedia 
of Forms, Cyclopedia of Law and Procedure, Corpus Juris, Digests and 
Statutes, English Reprints, numerous English Reports and Notes, etc. 
Also, the law library of the Supreme Court of Indiana, the Indiana State 
Library and the Indianapolis Public Library are available to students. 







Dean Rohbach 
at His Desk 






Page Thirty-eight 












•"fl*^ 













Each of these libraries is within a short radius of the Law School, 
the downtown branch of the Indianapolis Public Library being but three 
blocks away. They are all open without charge and maintain reading 
and reference rooms where periodicals and books of reference may be 
found. 

COURSE OF STUDY 

The course of study covers a period of three years. The students 
are divided into three classes, each class having separate and distinct 
instruction throughout the course. Recitations are so scheduled that 
lectures in other classes may be attended. Those members of the Second 
and Third Year classes who have pursued their studies at some other 
school, or in the office of an attorney, find this arrangement of the greatest 
advantage. 

This school not only gives to its classes separate and distinct instruc- 
tion, but it has arranged the schedule of recitations in such a manner as to 
devote two or three hours consecutively to each class, as the schedule 
may be. Each class has a minimum of twelve hours of recitations per 
week over a period of thirty-five weeks each year. 



Law School 
Faculty 







Page Thirty-nine 












& ~&~&"&'"ib+'fr*&~&~&'~&~&"<&'"&~'&'~&~&~4 




SENIORS 

^JUITE fitting it is that the last class to graduate from the Butler of 
Irvington before the old school becomes merely a memory should be the 
largest Senior Class to leave the halls of the University since the school's 
founding. The present class, exceeding two hundred and fifty students, 
is quite a contrast to the first class of three students which graduated from 
the present building. Thus has the school grown in the past seventy-three 
years. 

During their four years on the campus the Seniors have innovated 
several new social traditions. Theirs was the first Freshman Frolic on the 
campus. This was followed by the Cotillion in the Sophomore year and 
then the Junior "Prom" that set a standard for all future "Proms." 

The 1927 Drift, sponsored in their junior year and edited by Joseph 
Helms, won for the third consecutive time the first national prize for 
college yearbooks awarded by the Art Crafts Guild. 

The departing Seniors have witnessed the Corner-stone laying, which 
marked the end of the Irvington Butler they knew. Graduating on the 
eve of the building of a new university campus, the class of '28 completes 
seventy-three years of history of the old school. 







Gearheart, pres. ; Reagan, vice-pres. ; Roller, Sec; Parsons, treas. 

Page Forty-two 









*-•"* 









Adolay, Helen Marie Indianapolis 



al Club; B. U. S. 



Arnold, Alice Pauline Warsaw 



U. S. T. A. 



Anfderheide, Helen Hixon 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Botany 

Bailey, Virginia Mary 

Valley City, N. D. 

A. B. English: Delta Gamma r State Teachers College. 
Valley City. N. D. '25, '26: DePauw '2 7; Y. W. C. 
A.: League of Women Voters: Women's League; Girl's 
Glee Club; Thespis ; "Evryman" ; "The New Poor" 



Baldauf, Anna Margaret Lebanon 

a Alpha; President Home Arts 
r . W. C. A.: Woman's League: 
'27; Volleyball '26. '27; W. 



Ball, Gertrude Baird Indianapolis 

A. B. History; Women's League; Y. W. C. A.; Sand- 
wich Club: Inter-racial Club; Varsity Debating Team. 




Barkley, Esther 



Odon 



A. B. Home Economics and Chemistry: Delta Gamma: 
Graduate William Woods College '26; League of Women 
Voters; Vice-president Home Arts Club; Y. W. C. A.; 
Membership Committee Girl's Glee Club: Woman's 
League; Spanish Club: B. U. S. T. A. 

Barnes, Virginia Granthan 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Mathematics and Romance Languages ; Alpha Delta 
Theta: Phi Kappa Phi; Scarf Club; Drift Staff '27; 
Spanish Club; Poetry Club; President Math Club '2 7; 

B. U. S. T. A.; Y. W. C. A.: Women's League 



Baron, Bertha Degen Indianapolis 

A. B. Philosophy and Sociology: German Club; Phil 
osophy Club 



Bass, Herbert J. 



Australia 

A. B. Eugene Bible Uni- 



Beecher, Brazier Kerby Kokomo 

B. S. Chemistry: Kappa Delta Rho; Chemistry Club 
'26. '27: Inter-fraternity Council '27. '28; Men's 
Union Governing Board '26; Catalytic Club; Band '26. 
'27. 28 

Beecher, Frederick Kent Kokomo 

B. S. Economics: Kappa Delta Rho; Y. M. C. A. 
Vice-president '27; Men's Glee Club '26. '27. '28; 
Band '26. '27. '28; Commerce Club; Men's Union 




















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Benjamin, Noble Henderson 

Monticello 

A. B. Physics; B. U. S. T. A.; Poetry Club 



Boatman, Luther C. 



nd '25. '26; 



Sheridan 

U. S. T. A.; 



Tangier 



Booe, James Marvin 

B. 8. Chemistry 

Booth, Mildred, Mathews Milroy 

A. B. Latin and English; Delta Delta Delta; Opera 
Club; Classical Club; W. A. A.; Basketball, Volleyball; 
Y. W. C. A. 



Bosworth, Isaac Warren 

Indianapolis 



Bowers, M. Irene 

A. B. Botany; Phi Kappa Phi 



Indianapolis 



Boyd, Ona Emily 



Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Kappa Kappa Gamma; Vice-president 
Women's League; Pan-Hellenic Council; Chairman Pub- 
lic Welfare Committee League of Women Voters; So- 
cial Committee Y. W. C. A.; Philosophy Club. 

Brandt, Mary Catherine 

Indianapolis 



Brennen, Helen Louise Indianapolis 

A. B. English; B. U. S. T. A. 

Brown, Wendell Edgar Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Sigma Nu; Chemistry Club; Spanish 
Club: Sphinx; Inter-fraternity Council '2 6. '2 7; Busi- 
ness Manager Men's Glee Club '26. '27; Men's Union 
Governing Board '26; Y. M. C. A.: Inter-fraternity 
Baseball and Football: President B. U. S. T. A. '2 7. 
'28; Student Election Board '26. '27 



Buskin, Catherine Marie 

Indianapolis 

A. B. French and English: Varsity Debating; Y. W. C. 
A.: Women's League: B. U. S. T. A. 

Campbell, Marcena Fauntelle 

Indianapolis 



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Campbell, Mildred Florence 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English: B. U. S. T. A.: Chemistry Club: 
Biology Club; Y. W. C. A. World Fellowship Com- 

Canfield, Dorothea Ruth 

Indianapolis 

A. B. French: Delta Delta Delta: Women's League: 
Y. W. C. A.; League of Women Voters: Committee 
of 125; Vice-president French Club '26; Junior Prom 
Committee '26: B. U. S. T. A.; Home Arts Club 



Carroll, George Earl Noblesville 



Chadd, Archie 



Bainbridge 

B. S. Economics: Delta Tau Delta: Basketball Captain 
28; Football; Baseball 



Chalfant, Clara LaVon 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Home Economics: Girl's Glee Club Librarian: 
Home Arts Club: Classical Club: Cbemistty Club: B. 
U. S. T. A.: Women's League; Y. W. C. A.: League 
of Women Voters 

Chambers, Lois Florence 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Latin and Spanish: Miami University; Classical 
Club: B. U. S. T. A.; Library Committee Y. W. C. A. 



Christie, Robert Harold Justin 

A. B. History 

Clark, Alice Maud Templeton, Col. 

A. B. Bible; Campus Club: University Nurse 



Clark, Elizabeth Indianapolis 

A. B. English 

Clay, Josephine Carol North Salem 

A. B. English: Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Clinehens, La Verne Elizabeth 

Indianapolis 

A. B. History and Theology: Scarf Club; Y. W. C. A.. 
Home Am Club 

Coble, Almon Jacob Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Sigma Chi: Secretaty Pen and Pencil 
•2 7; Thespis: "The Whole Town Is Talking"; "The 
Climbers"; Art Direcror "Everyman" 




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Collyer, George Stanley 

Indianapolis 

A. B. History: Phi Delta Theta; Business Manager 
Drift '2 7; Vice-president B. U. S. T. A.; Vice- 
president Blue Key '27; Basketball '25. '26. '27; Base- 
ball '25, '26. '27; Track '27; Football '27; Captain 
Freshman Basketball 

Conn, Lova Mary Knightstown 

A. B. French: Alpha Delta Theta; W. A. A.; Social 
Committee Women's League; Y. W. C. A.; Gill's Glee 
Club; Home Arts Club; B. U. S. T. A.; Chemistry 
Club; Home Economics Assistant '2 7 



Conway, Anna Margaret 

Indianapolis 

B. S. Mathematics: Phi Kappa Phi; Alomni Scholarship 
'24-'25, '25-'26. '27-'28; Math Club; Women s 
League; B. U. S. T. A. 



Cook, Junya B. 

A. B. Mathematics 



Wilkinson 



Cooney, Edna Margaret Madison 



Cunningham, Helen Bethel 

Martinsville, III. 

A. B. Spanish: Kappa Phi 
Spanish Club; B. U. S. T. A 
League 



Davis, Frances Rosiland 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Romance Languages: Y. W. C. A.; B. U. S. 
T. A; Women's League 

Davis, M. Turpin Indianapolis 

B. S. Economics: Phi Delta Theta; Commerce Club; 
Philokurian; Blue Key; President Phi Delta Theta '27 



Dean, Martha Helen Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chairman Build- 
ing Fund Women's League; W. A. A.: Y. W. C. A.; 
Phi Delta Phi; Volleyball; Basketball '26. '27 



Deem, Dorothy 



Greensburg 



A. B. Economics: Pi Beta Phi; Y. W. C. A.; League 
of Women Voters; Women's League; Biology Club; 
May Day Committee '2 7; Secretary International Rela- 
tions Club '28; Student Budget '25 



Dietz, Martha 

A. B. English: B. U. S. 1 

DuPee, Lucy Bell 

A. B. English and Spanish 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 


















Durbin, David 



A. B. Education 



Indianapolis 



Eastland, Helen Burns Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Kappa Kappa Gamma: Thespis; Clas- 
sical Club: National Collegiate Playets ; "Evetyman ' : 
"Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh"; "The New Poor"; Women's 
League; Y. W. C. A.; B. U. S. T. A. 



Eckstein, Fred Martin Indianapolis 

and Sociology 




Emhardt, Ruth Bernd Indianapolis 

Captain Uni- 



B. English; 
iity Club; ( 
s Club; Che, 



nan Club; B.' U. 
:ry Club 



Fay, Miriam Louise 



Indianapolis 

A. B. Chemistry: Delta Delta Delta; Chimes; Phi Delta 
Phi; President W. A. A. '27; Class Basketball '25. 
•26, '27; Varsity Basketball '27, '28; Volleyball '27. 
•28 



Finney, Helen Opal 



Tiosa 



iity Club; B. U. S. T. A.; Cla 



Firestine, Albert Neil Indianapolis 

A. B. Zoolorjf/; Lambda Chi Alpha; Class Treasurer '2 7; 
President Thespis '2 8; Secretary National Collegiate 
Players '28; "The Climbers"; "The Dust of the 
Road"; Biology Club 

Fisher, George William Indianapolis 



Fletcher, Elizabeth Alice 

Indianapolis 

A. B. French and English: Phi Delta Phi; French 
Club; B. U. S. T. A.; League of Women Voters; 
Women's League 

Fletcher, Mamie Indianapolis 

A. B. English 



Floyd, Walter William Indianapolis 



Foxworthy, Clara V. Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Delta Delta Delta; Spanish Club; 
Treasurer W. A. A.: Treasurer Math Club '26; Melt- 
ing Pot Bazaar Committee '26. '27; Basketball '27; 
Class Basketball '25. '26. '27; Class Volleyball '25. 
'26. '27; Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; Committee 
of 100 




















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Frey, Paul Emerson 



Anderson 



A. B. History: Chi Rho Zeta: Men's Glee Club: Span- 
ish Club; Chemistry Club; Mens Union; Geneva Stunts; 

B. U. S. T. A.; Fairview Follies 

FURSTENBERG, FRANK FoLKE 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Zoology and Chemistry: Lambda Chi Alpha; Nil 
Sigma Nu: Indiana Medical School; Phi Kappa Phi: Tau 
Kappa Alpha: Varsity Debating '26: Getman Club: 
Chemistty Club; Biology Club; Philosophy Club 

Gearheart, Donald Hugh 

Logansport 

A. B. Journalism: Delta Tau Delta; Sigma Delta Chi; 
Philokutian: Pen and Pencil: Collegian Staff '25. '26. 
'2 7; Drift Business Staff 2 7; Senior Class President: 
Chairman Student Budget; Sphinx; Football '25. '26. 
27; Track '26 

Gessner, Dorothy Jean Indianapolis 

A. B. English and Home Economics: Home Arts Club. 
University Club; Art Academy of Cincinnati '21 -'2 2; 
Ohio State University '22-'23, '23-'24 

Gibson, Eleanor Gertrude 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Chemistry: Delta Delta Delta: Chemistry Club: 
Catalytic Club; Home Arts Club; World Fellowship; 
Women's League: Y. W. C. A.; Assistant Chairman 
Geneva Stunts: Asssistant Chairman Geneva Conference 



Gluesenkamp, Earl William 

Indianapolis 



Goens, Mildred 



Indianapolis 



A. B. English: Alpha Delra Theta ; Vice-President In- 
dianapolis Girls' Glee Club; Y. W. C. A.; Women's 
League 

Gorman, Helen Irene Indianapolis 



Grainger, Gertrude Constance 

Lynchburg, V a. 

A. B. Botany: Phi Kappa Phi: Magna Cum Laude 



Gray, Harry Thomas 

A. B. History 



Oaklandon 



Gray, Lon Ray Indianapolis 

B. S. L. Biblical Literature 

Green, Bertha Isabel Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Delta Delra Delta: Scarlet Quill: Presi- 
dent Chimes '27: President Scarf Club '26; Vict- 
cbairman Student Budget; Secretary W. A. A.: Wom- 
en's League: Y. W. C. A.; Secretary Freshman Class 
'25: Basketball: Volleyball : Tennis: Chairman Song 
Book Committee 



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Gremelspacher, Joseph A. 

Logansport 

A. B. Journalism: Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx: Sigma 
Delta Chi; Business Manager Collegian '26: Advertis- 
ing Manager Directory; Co-Director "Fairview Follies"; 
Manager Men's Glee Club; Manager Cocoon; Committee 
of 125; Business Manager "Fairview Revue" '2 3; Mar- 
shall Homecoming Parade '24; Junior Prom '25; Inter- 
fraternity Council; Phi Mu Alpha; German Club 

Gunsolus, Charles Indianapolis 

A. B. Bible 



Hackleman, Margaret Indianapolis 

A. B. English and French; Kappa Kappa Gamma: Phi 
Kappa Phi; Cum Laude; Women's League; French Club: 
Home Arts Club: Y. W. C. A.; May Day Breakfast 
Committee '2 7; Vice-president Philokurian 

Harger, William Theodore 

Noblesville 



Harris, Edward William 

Indianapolis 

B. S. Economics and Business Administration; Treas- 
urer Y. M. C. A. 

Harrison, Archibald Parker 

Indianapolis 

A. B. History: Tau Kappa Alpha: Varsity Debating 



Harrison, Harold Brisco Clinton 

A. B. Journalism: Sigma Delta Chi; Associate Editor. 
Chief Editorial Writer Collegian; Biology Club; Press 



Hawkins, Anna Frances 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; University Club; B. U. S. T. A.. 
Women's League 



Helmer, Dorothy Garr Indianapolis 



Committee. World Fellowship Committee Y. W. C. A.: 
B. U. S. T. A.: Melting Pot Bazaar: League ol 
Women Voters; May Day Pageant; Basketball 

Henderson, George W. Indianapolis 

A. B. Economics; Kappa Delta Rho (Pres.); Philo- 
kurian: Commerce Club; Men's Union 



HlGGINS, OCIE 



Lebanon 



A. B. English: Kappa Alpha Thcta: Sigma Alpha 
Iota; Chimes; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; President Opera 
Club '2 7; President Girl's Glee Club; "Icebound" 

Hitchcock, Gareth Mitchell 

Indianapolis 

B. S. Economics; Delta Tau Delta: Delta Theta Phi; 
Indiana Law School: Men's Glee Club; Spanish Club- 
Chemistry Club; Track 




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HOLLINGSWORTH, HAROLD 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Sigma Chi; Fairview Follies 



Hooker, Gladys 



Indianapolis 



A. B. Mathematics; Delta Delta Delta; Phi Delta Phi 
President Pan-Hellenic '28; Treasurer Y. W. C. A. '27 
Vice-president Junior Class; Treasurer Scarlet Qoill '28 
Vice-president Math Club '26, '27; Secretary and Treas- 
urer Pan-Hellenic '2 7; President Math Club '2 8; Social 
Committee Women's League '28; W. A. A.; Com- 
mittee of 125; French Club; Student Industrial 



HOUGHLAND, WlLLIAM 



Hunt, Lilly Armor 

A. B. Education 



Milroy 



Indianapolis 



Hunt, Lois Crawfordsville 

A. B. English; Zeta Tau Alpha:; Home Arts Clnb; 

B. U. S. T. A.: Dramatic Club: Spanish Clnb; Wom- 
en's League; Y. M. C. A.; Biology Clnb 

Huston, Margaret La Verne 

Indianapolis 

iity Club; Y. W. C. A.; German 



Jackman, Willis Lester 



A. B. English; Delta Tau Delta: 
and Baseball; Varsity Basketball 
sity Baseball '26: President Int 
Math Club: Spanish Club 



Indianapolis 

Freshman Basketball 
25, '26. '27: Var- 
t-ftaternity Council; 



Johnston, Madge Duckwall 

Indianapolis 

B. S. Education 



Kahn, Willard Indianapolis 

B. S. Economics; Commerce Club 

Kennedy, Mariana Moore 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Delta Delta Delta; W. A. A.; Y. W. 

C. A.; Women's League; Prom Queen '2 7; Philo- 
kurian; Secretary French Club; Secretary Press Clnb '2 6 



King, Donald James Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Phi Delta Theta; Incer-frarernity Foot- 
ball. Basketball, Baseball, Track; Inter-class Basketball 
'25. '26. '27 

King, Thelma Ruth Indianapolis 

A. B. English and Spanish: Alpha Chi Omega; League 
of Women Voters: Spanish Club; Girl's Glee Club: W. 
A. A.; B. U. S. T. A.; Women's League; Y. W. C. A. 


















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Kreuger, Hattie Emily Indianapolis 



Kurzrok, Denice Indianapolis 

A. B. French, ■ Tennis; Biology Clnb ; B. U. S. T. A. 



Lee, Richard Owen 

B. S. L. New Testament 

MacLean, Ellen 



Wolcott 



Toledo, Ohio 

on Pi 



B. S. Zoology and Mathematics ; Alpha O 
(President); Treasurer Scarf Club '2 6; W. A. A. 
Swimming Sport Head '27; Treasurer League of Wome 
Voters: Biology Club '28: Treasurer Biology Club '2 7 
Drift Art Staff 27. '28; Assistant Zoology Depart 
ment '26, '27, '28; Women's League; Art Directo 
"Fairview Follies"; B. U. S. T. A. 



McBride, Zora Blanche Frankfort 

A. B. English; University Club President; Women's 
League; B. U. S. T. A.; Biology Club; Chairman 
Activity Point System 

McCormick, Mary Loretta 

Indianapolis 



Mahoney, Agnes Indianapolis 

A. B. English 

Madden, Mary Dorothy Tangier 

A. B. English; Kappa Pbi ; Pan-Hellenic Council; Home 
Arts Club; Biology Club; B. U. S. T. A.: Y. W. C. 
A.; Rido; Women's League; Campus Club '25. '26 



Marshall, Bazil McCoy 



S. Economics and 



Indianapolis 



Maurer, Gretchen L. Indianapolis 

A. B. Mathematics and Latin; Math Club; B. U. S. T. 
A.; Math Pageant; June Day Pageant 



May, (Mrs. 



Frieda Easton 

Indianapoli 



May, Mary Ethel Indianapolis 

A. B. Mathematics; B. U. S. T. A.; Math Club 



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Medias, Julias 

A. B. History: T 



Indianapolis 

Men's Debating 



Meyer, (Mrs.) Grace Ingledue 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Phi Kappa Phi: Cum Laude: Theta 
Alpha Phi; Bachelor of Oratory Degree Ohio Northern 
Universtiy; B. U. S. T. A.; Y. W. C. A.; Women's 
League; Student Industrial Association; Chairman Liv- 
ing Costs Committee League of Women Voters; Secre- 
tary Thespis '2 7; Varsity Debating Team; "Twee- 
dies"; "The Climbers" 



Miller, Elizabeth Ann Indianapolis 

A. B. Chemistry; Zeta Tau Alpha; Phi Kappa Phi; 
Cum Laude; Philokurian : Pan-Hellenic Council: Chem- 
istry Club: Y. W. C. A.; Chapel Music Chairman; 
Catalytic Club 

Million, Olga Josephine Monticello 

A. B. Mathematics 



Minor, Flossie Sue Indianapolis 

A- B. English and Mathematics: University Club: Math 
Club; Classical Club; Rido: Y. W. C. A.: Women's 
League: B. U. S. T. A. 

Mintjala, Mary Allen Lincoln, III. 

A. B. English: University Club; Y. W. C. A.; Cam- 
pus Club 



Moore, Adalai Clyde Indianapolis 

B. 5. Physics and Mathematics: Phi Kappa Phi: Com- 
Laude; Senior Scholarship 

Moore, Beulah Marjorie Rossville 

B. M. Music; Alpha Cbi Omega: Girl's Glee Club 



Moormann, Helen Marie 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English and German; President German Club: 

B. U. S. T. A.; Women's League 

Mundy, Anna Ruth Henderson, Ky. 



Myers, Lois H. 



A. B. Mathematics: Alpha Delta Pi: DePauw Uni- 
versity '25. '26; Women's League: Math Club; B. U. 
S. T. A. 



Nail, Adrian B. 



Carmel 

lePauw Uni- 
Club; B. U. 

St. Paul 



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P 



A. B .Economics: Sigma Nu (President) 
dent Sphinx; Men's Glee Club . 



%rj|*v- '*'~&'"&-'&~l 



Nelson, Eldon Ferdinand 

Indianapolis 



I 



A. B. English: Chi Rho Zc 

Ogborn, Jane Quick 



Frankton 

English; Kappa Alpha Theta : Phi Kappa Phi: 
l Laude; President Scarlet Quill; Chimes; Phi Delta 
; Freshman Scholarship cup; Senior Scholarship; 
;ident Women's League; Vice-president League of 
mn Voters; National Collegiate Players; Thespis ; 
a; Y. W. C. A.: French Club; Drift '27: Inter 
onal Relations Club; "The Climbers"; "The New 
r"; "Dust of the Road" 



Oliver, Dora Marie Crawfordsville 

A. B. Sociology and Philosophy: President Studenc 
Volunteers; World Fellowship Committee Y. W. C. A.; 
Cosmopolitan Club; Inter-collegiate Club; Sandwich 
Club 



O'Neill, Donald 

A. B. Mathematics 



Logansport 



Ostheimer, George Francis 

Indianapolis 



A. B. History: Sign 


a Nu; Secretary and 


Kappa Alpha '2 3. 


'24; Varsity Debate 


'24; Director Men's 


Union '24; Presiden 


Club '24; President 


Pbilokurian '24; B 


Drift '24 





Owen, Helen Theresa Indianapolis 

B. M. Music 



Page, Ruby 

^4. B. History 

Parsons, Kenneth H 



Indianapoli 



Kokomo 

:s. Sociology and Philosophy: Treasurer 
Phi Kappa Phi; Tau Kappa Alpha- 



Y. M. C. A. 



Patterson, Mary Grace Shelbyville 

A. B. English: University Club; B. U. S. T. A.: 
Women's League 

Peacock, Olive Ruth Union City 

A. B. English: World Fellowship Committee Y. W. C 
A.: Inter-racial Group; Cosmopolitan Club; French 
Club; B. U. S. T. A. 



Pierson, Clara Margaret 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English and Latin; President Y. W. C. A. '28; 
World Fellowship Chairman '2 7; League of Women 
Voters; B. U. S. T. A.; Classical Club; Biology Club 

Pierson, A. Theodore West Newton 

A. B. History and Spanish; Spanish Club; Track 



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Pritchett, Velma Pearl 



A. B. English 

Pruett, Lois 

A. B. English; Kappa Ga 



Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 
b. u. s. T. A. 



Ransom, Clemie Ethel Indianapolis 

A. B. Botany: Alpha Kappa Alpha; Chairman Inter- 
racial Group; Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Botany Club; 

B. U. S. T. A.; President Intercollegiate Club 

Ratts, Edith Katherine 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Alpha Chi Omega; Ward-Belmont '25- 
'26; Collegian Staff '27. '28; President League of 
Women Voters '28; Girl's Glee Club; Press Club: 
Math Club: Geneva Stunt Committee '28: Usher Com- 
mittee Women's League '2 8; W. A. A.; Y. W. C. A.: 
Basketball and Volleyball 



Reagan, Katherine Esther 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Pi Beta Phi (President) ; Vice-president 
Senior Class; Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; Liberi 
'24, '25; Home Arts Club; Junior Prom Committee 
Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; B. U. S. T. A.; 



Reed, Elizabeth 



Indianapolis 



A. B. English; Delta Gamma; Earlham College '24, 25: 
Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; B. U. S. T. A.; 
Rido; Biology Club 



Relander, Geraldine 



Robertson, Geneva M. 

A. B. Botany and Zoology; Alph 
Assistant '26, '27. '28; Bo 
French Club; Zoology Seminar 



Indianapolis 

rsity Club; Sectetaty 

Kokomo 

Omicton Pi; Zoology 
ny Assistant '27. 28; 
26; Biology Club 



Rodebeck, Matilda Mount Comfort 

i4. B. Mathematics 

Roe, Mary Torbert Kentland 



Rogers, Murhl Morris town 

B. S. L. Bible 

Roller, Irma Hermine Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Alpha Chi Omega; Scarlet Quill; Sec- 
retary Senior Class; Ptesident National Collegiate Play- 
ers; Student Council; Pan-Hellenic Council '2 7. '2 8: 
Chairman Hospital Committee Women's League; "The 
Whole Town's Talking"; Melting Pot Bazaar Commit- 
tee '2 7; Social Committee Y. W. C. A.; May Day 
Pageant '25, '26: Spanish Club: Junior Volleyball '27 






^ 
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Ross, Louise Eleanor Indianapolis 

A. B. Journalism; Theta Sigma Phi; Vice-president 
Scarlet Quill; Chimes: Editor Christmas Stocking '26; 
Editor Cocoon '27, '28; Vice-president Pen and Pencil 
'26; Women's League '26, '27; May Day Breakfast 
Committee '26: Collegian Repotter '25. Assignment 
Editor '25. '26. Copy Editor, Associate Editor '26. '27. 
Column Writer '2 7; Publicity Chairman Radio Bureau 
'2 7: Second Prize Literary Contest '2 6; Second Prize 
Pettis Advertising Contest '2 7: First Prize Pettis Ad- 
vertising Contest '27; Drift Staff '26; Press Club; 
International Relations Club; Libeti 

Rundell, Mary Louise Indianapolis 

A. B. Chemistry 



Sagalowsky, Julius Indianapolis 

B. S. Economics; Tennis 

Scheleen, Joseph Carl LaPorte 

B. E. Economics: Delta Tan Delta: Managing Editor 
Collegian '2 6; Editor Collegian '2 7: President Sigma 
Delta Chi '28; Blue Key; Philokutian ; German Club 



Schmitz, Helen Charlotte 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Alpha Delta Theta ; Phi Delta Phi; 
Delta Phi: Women's League: Program Chairman Y. W. 
C. A. '28; Vice-president Thespis '27; Secretary Rido 
'26; Varsity Debating Team '27, '28: Classical Club: 
Director World Fellowship Pageant '2 7; B. U. S. T. 
A.; "The Youngest"; "The Climbers" 

Schoen, Maurice Lloyd Indianapolis 

B. S. Economics and Business Administration 



SCRIVNER, CALLIE VeATILE 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English and French 

Shaffer, Dorothy Louise 

Indianapolis 



Sheehe, Jeannette Louvisa 

Bloomfield 

B. M. Music; Pi Beta Phi: Associate Editor Drift '27: 
Freshman Drive Committee '24; Opera Club '24; Y. 
W. C. A.; Women's League; Girl's Club '25; French 
Club '25 

Shipley, Harold Lowell 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Tau Kappa Tau (President) ; President 
French Club '2 6; Math Club: Press Club: Men's Union 
Executive Board '2 8; Philokurian: Junior Prom Com- 
mittee '2 7; Collegian Staff '2 5. 



Shulgasser, Bernard Lithuania 

A. B. Mathematics; International Relations Club 

Shumake, Lucile Augusta 

McAlester, Okla. 

A. B. English 






















f 








Small, Virginia 



Indianapolis 

A. B. Zoology; Alpha Delta Pi; Phi Kappa Pbi : Cum 
Laude; Biology Clubi Zoology Club: Classical Club 



Smith, Alpha 

A. B. History 



New Palestine 









Smith, Helen Maude Indianapolis 

B. S. Economics and Business Administration 

Smith, Lucinda Carolyn 



A. B. English; Alpha Chi On 



Indianapolis 



nd Trea. 
irf Club '2 6: Treas- 
Junior League of Women Voters '2 7; Drift Stalf 
B. U. S. T. A.; Women's League. Y. W. C. A. 




Smith, Mildred Mary Indianapolis 

A. B. Home Economics and Chemistry; Alpha Delta 
Theta; B. U. S. T. A.; Catalytic Club; Home Arts 
Club; Chemistty Club; Women's League; Y. W. C. A.; 
Varsity Basketball 

Stegemeier, Karl August 

Indianapolis 




A. B. English and German; Sigma 
'25, '27. '28; Drift Staff '27. 
German Club; Tbespis ; "The Pipe 
"The Climbers'; Y. M. C. A. 



Stevens, Anna 

A. B. English 

Stoelting, Mildred 

A. B. History 



Chi; Collegian Staff 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 




Stokesberry, D. Marie Indianapolis 

A. B. English 

Stout, Ruby Mae Indianapolis 

A. B. Economics and English; Alpha Delta Pi; Phi 
Delta Phi; Spanish Club; Press Club; Y. W. C. A.; 
Women's League 




Swan, Flora Gladys 



Plainville 



A. B. English; Delta Zeta ; Indiana University; Wom- 
en's League; Y. W. C. A.; Home Arts Club 

Swift, Dorothy Louise Indianapolis 

A. B. English and Journalism: Alpha Omicron Pi: 
Collegian Staff '2 7; Biology Club; Dramatic Club '24; 
Basketball 



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9 



Thiele, Anna 



Indianapolis 

U. S. T. A.: German 



Thompson, Robert Luther 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Chemistry and Zoology: Sigma Nu: Track Team 
'25-'27; Thespis; Chemisrry Club Zoology Club 



Tomlinson, Helen May 



Indianapolis 



A. B. English and Latin: Alpha Delt, 
Kappa Phi; Pan-Hellenic Council; Phi Delia Phi; Clas- 
sical Club; B. U. S. T. A.: W. A. A.; Junior Prom 
Commiltee: Freshman Endowment Committee '2 5: Y. 
W. C. A. 

Treadway, Katheryne Louise 

LaPorte 

A. B. Public Speaking: President Delta Phi '2 8: Var- 
sity Debating Team '2 7: Thespis; "The Youngest": 
"The Climbers"; Sandwich Club; Coe College '25. '26 



Tudor, Cyril Walker Hall 

A. B. History 

Tudor, Horace Hays Monrovia 

B. S. Economics: Sigma Nu ; Basketball '24, '25; 
Debating '26; Tau Kappa Alpha; Sphinx; Y. M. C. A. 



Underwood, Elizabeth Anne 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Alpha Chi Omega; University of Ok- 
lahoma '25. '26. '27 

Vandover, Zeno Zionsville 

A. B. History: Phi Kappa Phi 



Wagoner, Mary 



Indianapolis 



A. B. English and Spanish: Kappa Kappa 
Endowment Fund Committee '25; Chairman Melt, 
Pot Bazaar '2 7; Women's League; Y. W. C. A. 



Wallace, Eleanor 

A. B. English and Philosophy: Phi Kappa Phi; Phil 
phy Club 



Evanston, III. 



Wfyer, Helen Mary Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Home Arts Club: Women's League 

Wheatley, James Parker 

Indianapolis 

A. B. Philosophy and English: Sigma Nu: Treasurer 
al Collegiate Players '28: President Thespis """ 



Treasurer 


Pen 


and Penc 


1 '28: Po 


etry Club: Second 


Prize Or 


torica 


Contest 


26: Cococ 


n Staff '27. '28: 


Make-up 


Chai 


man "Tv 


teedles": 


'Mrs. Bumpstcad- 


Leigh"; 


"The 


Climbers 


'; Busine 


s Manager "The 



"The Whole To 




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; Phi Kappa Phi 
mittee: Y. W. C. 
et-sorority Basket- 



Woessner, Margaret Miller 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Kappa Kappa Gam 

Cum Laude; Student Industrial C 

A.: Classical Club; French Club: 

ball; Intec-class Basketball '26, '27; W. A. A.; 

Social Committee Women's League 

Woodfill, Elizabeth Greensburg 

A. B. English; Pi Beta Phi; Rido; Biology Club: 
Women's League; Y. W. C. A.; B. U. S. T. A. 



Wright, Dorothy Harris 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English; Kappa Alpha Tbeta: Scarf Club; Opera 
Club; Girl's Glee Club: B. U. S. T. A. 

Zwickel, Lena Josephine 

Indianapolis 

A. B. English: Delta Zeta; Melting Pot Bazaar Com- 
mittee '2 6; Home Economics Club: B. U. S. T. A.: 
Y. W. C. A.; Women's League: "The Whole Town's 
Talking": Thespis; Pan-Hellenic Council '27; Basket- 
ball '25; Dramatic Club '24, '25, '26. 



Page Fifty-eight 






It 




E KNOWS and he knows not that he knows," can truly be said 
of the Junior. Since his entrance into the University three years ago he 
has been accomplishing great things of which he is not yet aware. Along 
with this the class of '29 will have the honor of being the first to graduate 
from the Butler at Fairview. 

The "Prom," the climax of the social year at Butler, was in no way 
overshadowed by any previously given dance. With Wilma Dunkle as the 
queen and the entire student body as her subjects, the affair was truly a 
success. The programmes and decorations, the result of much painstak- 
ing effort on the part of the committee in charge, of which Joseph Cripe 
was chairman, made the dance one long to be remembered. 

The second major work of the class was the publication of the Drift. 
For the past three years the annual publication of the junior class has car- 
ried away the first national prize. This year's book — carried out in a 
futuristic design, both in the cover and illustrations — suggests a feeling 
of modernism with the Butler of Fairview as its main theme. 

The Junior Class contributed many outstanding members not only to 
athletics but to various campus activities as well. It promises well to up- 
hold the dignity of the first wearers of the cap and gown at Fairview. To 
"accomplish" has been the guiding maxim of the class of '29. 




Higgins, pres. ; Hampton, vice-pres. ; Skelton, sec; Haggard, treas. 



Page Sixty 



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AGNEW, Ruth Indianapolis 

Thespis; Rido 

Alexander, Margaret Connersville 

Zeta Tau Alpha: Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; W. 



Ammeter, Russell Indianapolis 

Tau Kappa Tau ; Chemistry Club; Zoology Club; 
Men's Union 

Armstrong, Martha Indianapolis 



Auger, Margaret Mt. Auburn, III. 

Campus Club; Home Arts Club; Y. W. C. A. 

Axline, Lois Indianapolis 

University Club (Sec); Ind. School of Music 



Baker, Martha 



Indianapolis 



Ball, Alice Indianapolis 

Kappa Alpha Theta (Pres.) ; Melting Pot Bazaar 



Barclay, Elizabeth Indianapolis 



Barnard, Janice Indianapolis 

Pi Beta Phi; W. A .A.; Women's League: French Club: 
Biology Club; Y. W. C. A.; Freshman Basketball 



Bartley, Pearl Jacksonville, Fla. 

Delta Zeta; Chimes; Drift '2 8: N. C. P.: Sec. Intern. 
Relations Club: Sec. Rido: Play Reading Com. Thespis: 
Y. W. C. A.: Women's League Music Com.: Scarf 
Club: Winner L. W. V. Stunt Contest: Pen and Pencil; 
"The Climbers"; "Mrs. Bumpscead-Lcigh" 

Beem, Richard Indianapolis 

Sigma Chi (Pres.) ; Blue Key: Bus. Mgr. Drift '2 8 



Benham, Mary 



Salem 



Delta Zeta: Y. W. C. A. Cabinet: Women's League: 
Melting Pot Bazaar: Social Service; Rido: Home Arts 
Club: W. A. A.; Pan-Hellenic Council; Basketball; 
Volleyball 



Benning, Lotys 



Indianapolis 



Theta Sigma Phi: Pen and Pencil; Drift '27, '28: 
Cocoon: Collegian: Publicity Com. May Day: " 
Club 















Beyer, Earl Indianapolis 

Drift Art Staff '28; John Herron Art School 



Bingham, Mary 



Boaz, Carlos 



Bolin, Merle 



Indianapolis 



Morgantown 



Huntingburg 



Y. W. C. A.; Girl's Glee Club; Campus Club; Worn- 



Bolte, John 

Sigma Cbi 



Indianapolis 



Bonke, Olga 



Indianapolis 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Treas. Women's League; Vice-Pres. 
Social Service Ch.. Membership Ch. Y. W. C. A.: 
Biology Ciob; Chemistry Club; Catalytic Club; League 
of Women Voters; Volleyball; Basketball 



Bourne, Mary 
Brandt, Lenore 

Kappa Alpha Theta ; Girl'; 
Y. W. C. A. 



Bratton, Opal 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Club; Music Com. 



New Richmond 



Kappa Phi (Pres.) ; Rido; Spanish Club; Biology Club; 
Girl's Glee Club; Campus Club; W. A. A.: Y. W. C. 
A.; Melting Pot Bazaar; Women's League; May Day 
Program Com.; Basketball 



Burns, LaVonne 



Indianapolis 



Buskirk, George Indianapolis 

Chi Rho Zeta; Inter-Fraternity Council 

Callithan, Hardin Indianapolis 

Sigmu Nu; Men's Glee Club; Thespis 



Campbell, Jean Indianapolis 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Chimes; Drift '2 8; Collegian; 
Tbeta Sigma Phi 



Campbell, Mary K. 



Indianapolis 



Delta Zeta; Women's League; Library Com. Y. W. C. 
A.; Geneva Stunt Com.; Student Directory; Co" 



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Carr, Janet 



Indianapolis 



Pi Beta Phi; Y. W. C. A.: World Fellowship '26: 
Spanish Club; Women's League; Zoology Club: Home 
Arts Club 



Carter, James 

Delta Tau Delta 



Marshall 



Caulkins, Thomas Indianapolis 

Men's Glee Club; Collegian; Puss 



Chandler, Dana 



Clapp, Marcia 



Clarke, Hamilton 



Indianapolis 



Indianapolis 

f '28; John Herron 

Indianapolis 



Sigma Nu; Sphinx; Tteas. Rido '27; Vice-ptesident 
Thespis '2 8; Biology Club; "The Youngest"; "Every- 
man;" "The New Poor"; Football 



Cope, Arthur 



Indianapolis 



Sigma Nu; Drift '2 8; Gov. Board Men's Union; Che 
istry Club; Catalytic Club; Math Club; Che! 
Asst. '26-'28 



Crew, Rachel 

Delta Gamma 



Cripe, Joe 



Dayton, Ohio 



Delphi 



Daily, John Indianapolis 

Sigma Chi; Blue Key: Inter-fraternity Council; Elec- 
tion Board; Gov. Board Men's Union 



Dailey, Robert 

Sigma Chi 

Daniels, Wells 

Y. M. C. A.; Repres. 



Davis, Jean 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Geneva Conference '28 



Indianapolis 



Davis, Ruby 



Pendleton 

Alpha Chi Omega; Swarthmore '26: Drift '28; Phi 
Delta Phi; Collegian; Women's League: Y. W. C. A.: 
Home Arrs Club; W. A. A.; Press Club; League or 
Women Voters; Girl's Glee Club 










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DeVelling, Helen 



Indianapolis 



Delta Gamma; Prcs. Phi Delta Phi; 
Drift '28; League of Women Voters; Ch. L. W. V. 
Stunt Contest; Bus. Mgr. Geneva Stunts; French Club: 
Sec. Girl's Glee Club; May Day Pageant; Hospital 
Com. Women's League; Soc. Service Com. Y. W. C. A. 



Dienhart, Joe 



DUNKLE, WlLMA 

Pi Beta Phi; Junior I 
Home Arts Club: W. 
June Day Pageant Cor 
Convention 

Dunne, James 

Tau Kappa Tau 



Durbin, Esther 

Thespis 

Ellingwood, Ellen 



Lafayette 



Indianapolis 

en '28; Pan-Hellenic; 
Melting Pot Bazaar; 
ate State Pan-Hellenic 

Indianapolis 



Indianapolis 
Fortville 



Emrick, Rosalind Indianapolis 

Delta Gamma; Pan-Hellenic: Women's League; Y. W. 
C. A.; Girl's Glee Club; Spanish Club; Opera Club; 
League of Women Voters 

Epler, Mary Alice Indianapolis 

Delta Gamma: Fellowship. Program and Library Com. 
Y. W. C. A.; Girl's Glee Club; League of Women 
Voters; Women's League 



Ervin, Gladys 



Espy, Clark 



Ewing, Orpha 



Falvey, Mary K. 



Noblesville 



Logansport 



Indianapolis 

League; Y. W. C. A.; 

Indianapolis 



Alpha Delta Pi; Phi Delta Phi; Girl's Glee Club; 
Women's League; Y. W. C. A.; Spanish Club: Opera 
Club; Press Club 



FlLLINGHAM, JUDITH 

Alpha Delta Pi 

Finney, Helen 



Vincennes 
Indianapolis 



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Fitch, Josephine Indianapolis 

Delta Gamma: French Club: Y. W. C. A.; Women's 
League: League of Women Voters: Home Atts Club 

FULLENWIDER, ELIZABETH 

Indianapolis 

Zeta Tan Alpha: Scarf Club; Biology Club; Spanish 
Club: League of Women Voters: Women's League; 
Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A.; Basketball; Volleyball; 



Indianapolis 



Gable, Edwin 

Sigma Chi ; Spanish Club 

Gallagher, Elizabeth Indianapolis 

:s Club; 



Gardner, Kenton Indianapolis 

Garrison, Charles Indianapolis 

Chi Rho Zeta; Sigma Delta Chi; Cir. Mgr. Collegian '2 7 



Garwood, Edna Big Springs, Ohio 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Y. W. C. A.: Women's League: 



Geisler, Walter 

Tau Kappa Tau 



Indianapolis 



Gilbert, Catherine Indianapolis 

Delta Gamma: Chimes; Phi Delta Phi: Scarf Club: 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Women's League: Chemistr) 
Club; Catalytic Club 



Goodrich, Elizabeth 



Gueutal, Clifford 



Haggard, Gordon 



Winches te 



Indianapolis 



Indianapolis I Bk -^ 



Sigma Chi: Sphinx: Treas. Junior Class: Biology Club 
Chemistry Club; Mens Glee Club: Baseball " 
ball: Football 



Haines, Mary 



Hale, LaRue 



Pendleton 



Indianapolis 







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Indianapolis 

inior Class; Vice-pres. 
Vice-pres. League ol 
DePauw '25 

Indianapolis 

Kappa Kappa Gamma; Collegian; Student Ditectoty; 
Soc. Service Com. Y. W. C. A.; May Day Pageant; 
Libcaty Com.; World Fellowship; Women's League 



Hampton, Virginia 

Alpha Chi Omega; Vice-pres. . 
Chimes; Pres. W. A. A. '2 7; 
Women Voters '2 7; Pan-Hellenic 

Hancock, Elsie 



Hanna, Robert Ft. Wayne 

Delta Tan Delta; Capt. Golf Team; Fresh. Football 

Harbison, Robert Indianapolis 

Tau Kappa Tau; Chemistry Club; Spanish Club 



Harrold, Ernest Fairmount 

Delta Alpha Pi; Sandwich Club 



Hastings, Mary 



Indianapolis 



Tau Alpha; Pan-Hellenic; Y. W. C. A.; Women': 
League; Math Club 



Haynes, Helen 

Alpha Chi Omega; Social Co 
League; Spanish Club; Homt 

Higgins, Donald 

Sigma Nu; Blue Key; 
Glee Club; Gen. Ch. 
fraternity Council; Cbe 
Baseball 



Pittsboro 



Y. W. C. A.; Women'; 



Indianapolis 



Hines, Gertrude 

Y. W. C. A.; Math Club; Sec. Cla 
League 

Hinshaw, Iris 



N oblesville 

ical Club; Women's 

Carmel 



Hurst, Jane 



Alpha Chi Omega; Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; 
Math Club; Home Arts Club 

Ice, Margaret 

Kappa Alpha Thet; 



Kankakee, III. 

.. ; Women's League: 

Indianapolis 



Ingersoll, Charles Indianapolis 

Lambda Chi Alpha; Catalytic Club; Biology Club 

Irwin, Mary Indianapolis 

Alpha Delta Pi; Zoology Club; Y. W. C. A.; Worn- 









I 









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Jones, Eleanore 









Indianapolis 



Delta Gamma (Pres.) ; Treas. Y. W. C. 
Girl's Glee Club '28: Sec. French Club '2 7; Biology 
Club; W. A. A.; Women's League: League of Women 
Voters: May Day: Chimes Voucher '2 7 



Jones, Rebecca 



Indianapolis 

Kappa Alpha Theta : Women's League; League of Wom- 
en Voters; Literary Editot of Collegian 



Joyce, Mary Elizabeth Indianapolis 
Kelley, Martha Indianapolis 

Kappa Phi (Pres.); Phi Delta Phi; Pan-Hellenic; Y. 
W. C. A.; Women's League; Sopb. Basketball 



Kennedy, Mildred 
Kerr, Isabel 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 



Kilgore, Frederick 

Delta Tau Delta; Football 

Kingham, Helen 



Kistner, Harriet 



Lawrence 
Indianapolis 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

en's League; W. A. 

Indianapolis 



Delta Zeta; Phi Delta Phi; Spanish Club: Y. W. C. 
A.: Women's League: Rido: Cor. Sec. Tbespis '2 8: 
"Mrs. Bumpstead-Leigh"; Ch. Ticket Sales '"The 



Lawson, Dorothy 



Indianapolis 

League; W. 



Indianapolis 



Layman, Isabelle 

Kappa Alpha Theta: Drift Beauty '27; Pan-Hclleni< 
Y. W. C. A. Cabinet; Ch. Finance Com. Genevi 
Stunts: Faitview Follies 

Lewis, Arch Warren, Ohio 

Phi Delta Theta (Pres.); Pres. Inter-fraternity Council 



Lichtenberg, Nancy Indianapolis 



Lindenborg, Ruth 



Indianapolis 

gue: Y. 
Club 







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Lyons, Frances Indianapolis 



Malloch, Ethel Indianapolis 

Alpha Omicron Pi (Pres.): Phi Delti Phi; Pan- 
Hellenic; Sec. League of Women Voters '28; Melting 
Pot Bazaar; German Club; Lib. and Soc. Com. Y. W. 
C. A.; Student Industrial 



Manges, Edith Crawfordsville 

Classical Club; Math Club; Y. W. C. A. 

Marshall, Marian Indianapolis 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Publicity Com. Y. W. C. A. 



Masters, Mildred 



Mauzy, Emily 



Brookville 



Rushville 



Delta Gamma (Pres.); Drift '28; Y. W. C. A. Cabi- 
net: Soc. Com. Women's League; Sec. Student Budget; 
Pres. Girl's Glee Club; Sec.-Treas. Spanish Club: May 
Day Pageant 



May, Mary 
McDowell, Richard 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

;r-fraternity Council, 



McMahan, Wayne 



Messick, Jane 



Sitmmitville 

-fraternity Council; Math Club; 

Indianapolis 

Kappa Alpha Tbeta ; Art Editor Drift '28: Art Staff 
Cocoon '27; Poster Com. Women's League '27; John 
Herron Art School 



Mildner, Everett Indianapolis 

Lambda Chi Alpha: Sphinx: Yell Leader '25. '26, '27 

Miller, Harold Topeka 

Delta Alpha Pi; Band; Inter-fraternity Basketball 



Miller, Hilda Indianapolis 

University Club; Volleyball 

Mitchell, Frederick Indianapolis 

Sigma Nu: Chemistry Club 



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Montgomery, Robert 



W aldron 

s Club; Intci- 



Moore, Richard Vincennes 

Delta Alpha Pi; Sandwich Club 



Morga, Dorothy 



Morris, Radford 



Indianapolis 



Indianapolis 



Moschenross, Elizabeth 

Indianapoli 

Pi Beta Phi: Scarlet Quill; Pies. Pen and Pencil 2 7 
Pres. Delta Phi '27; Varsity Debating; Vice-ptcs. Rido 
Thespis; Asst. Cir. Mgr. Collegian, Ed. Wtitet Col 
legian; Cocoon; "The Climbets" 



Murphy, Mildred 

Alpha Delta Thet 
Biology Club; Ho 
unteet Convention 

Nulf, Robert 

Delta Tau Delta; 
man Football. Bas 

O'Dell, Bernetha 
Omelvena, Ruth 

Pi Beta Phi 

Orbison, Robert 

Sigma Chi; Sphinx: Pies. 



Indianapolis 



Ft. Wayne 

;ity Football; Fiesh- 

Mooreland 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 



Partlow, Elzie Indianapoli 

Sigma Nn; Band; Spanish Club 



Paul, Judson Selkirk, N. Y 

Delta Tau Delta; Sphinx; Football 






Paulissen, George 

Tau Kappa Tan 

Pectol, Ruth 



Indianapolis 
Spencer 




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Perrine, Joe Indianapolis 

Pbi Delta Thcta; Metropolitan School of Music 



Pflum, Urban 



Phillips, Alice 



Indianapolis 

r-fraternity Council; 



Indianapolis 



Delta Delta Delta; Pres. Y. W. C. A.; Junit 
Com.; Junior Finance Com.; Geneva Stunt Cb. ; Fea 
Ed. Collegian; Co-Cb. Interracial Com. Y. W. C. 
Zoology Club; Asst. Ch. Radio Bureau 



Pickrell, Janice 

Alpha Delta Theta; Tbesph 
C. A.; Campus Club 



Indianapolis 

.ens League; Y. W. 



Pier, Dorothy 



Indianapolis 

Pi Beta Phi; Pres. Chimes: Pres. Scarf Club; Geneva 
Stunt Com.: Ushers Com. Women's League; Asst. Ch. 
May Dav Breakfasr; Pres. Sophomore Class; Junior 
Prom Com.; Drift '28; Classical Club; Biology Club 

Pierce, Mary Louise Indianapolis 

Delta Delta Delta (Pres.); Collegian Staff: Girl's Glee 



Piercy, George Kokomo 

Band 

Pierson, Theodore West Newton 



Pitts, Robert 



Phi Delta The 



Indianapolis 



; P hinx; Philo; Pres. Sopho 
7; Catalytic Club; Chemistry Club; 
Mgr. '2 6; Math Club; Chem. Asst. 



Pritchard, Harmon Indianapolis 



Quinn, Maxine Indianapolis 

Delta Zeta; Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; Spanish 
Clnb; League of Women Voters 

Reeves, Emma Louise Mooresville 

Pi Beta Phi (Pres.); Vice-Pres. Phi Delta Phi: Biology 
Club; Spanish Club: Girl's Glee Club; Rido; League 
of Women Voters; Ch. Soc. Com. W. A. A.; Basketball 



Renick, Margaret 



Indianapolis 



Alpha Omicron Pi; Y. W. C. A.: Women's League: 
League of Women Voters: Philosophy Club; Student 
Industrial 



Reynolds, Hazel 



Indianapolis 



Alpha Delta Pi; Botany Journal Club; Ind. Academy 
of Science; Spanish Club; Women's League; Press Club 






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Rilling, Helen 



Robb, Gracie 

University Club 



Indianapolis 

W. C. A.; Women's 

Indianapolis 



Rubush, Katharine Indianapolis 

Delta Zeta; Pan-Hellenic: Y. W. C. A.; Women's 
League; French Club: Volleyball 

Rubush, Thelma Indianapolis 

Alpha Delta Pi; Ind. College of Music: Women's League 



Sando, Donald Madison 

Delta Tau Delta: Governing Boatd Men's Union 

Dayton, Ohio 

Delta Delta Delta; Y. W. C. A.; Women's League: 
Home Acts Club 



Scales, Maxine 



Scherb, Von 



Indianapolis 



Tteas. lntetnational Relations Club: Band: Spanish 
Club: Dtift Bus. Staff '28; Adv. Staff Student Ditec- 
tory ; "Romancets" 

Indianapolis 

Delta Tau Delta: Sphinx: Inter-frat. Council; Gov. 
Board Men's Union; Men's Union; Fairview Follies: 
Vatsity Football; Intet-Frat. Football. Basketball, Base- 
ball. Track 



Schmedel, Frank 



Schube, Frances Indianapolis 

Delta Gamma 

Seever, Lucille Carlisle 

Kappa Phi: Women's League: Y. W. C. A. 



Seward, Evelyn 



Columbus 



Kappa Alpha Theta : Chimes: Phi Delta Phi: Fresh 
Scholatship: Dtift '28: Ch. Student Industtial : Vice- 
ptes. W. A. A.; Classical Club; Women's League: 
League of Women Votets ; Basketball 

Shaeffer, Mildred Indianapolis 

Alpha Delta Theta; Women's League: Y. W. C. A. 



Shepperd, Fenley 



Indianapolis 

Delta Tau Delta (Pres.) : Blue Key; Ed. Drift '28; 
Pres. International Relations Club '2 7; Vice-pres. Pen 
and Pencil '2 7; Bus. Mgr. Student Directory: Ch. 
Junior Finance Com.; Ed. Writer Collegian; Men's 
Union 

Shimer, Allan Indianapolis 

Delta Tau Delta; Inter-fraternity Council 



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Symmes, Frank 

Phi Delta Tbeta 

Teeters, Wilbur 

Chi Rho Zeta; Chemistry Asst. 



Thorne, (Mrs.) Lorene 



Tilford, Esther 



Indianapolis 
Indianapolis 

Indianapolis 

W. A. A.; Basket- 

Martinsville 



Tracy, Robert Indianapolis 

Sigma Cbi: Freshman Class Pees. 

Turner, Lucile Lebanon 

Poetry Club; Cocoon; Women's League 



Underwood, Eugene Indianapolis 

Chi Rho Zeta; Fraternity Ed. Drift '29; Philo 



Unger, Jean 



Indianapolis 



Vennard, Helen 



Indianapolis 

Alpha Delta Theta: Rido: Thespis; Varsity Debate. 
Delta Phi; Girl's Glee Club; Sec. Y. W. C. A.; Dele- 
gate Geneva Conf . ; "The Youngest"; "Everyman" 



Vestal, Jean 



Indianapolis 



Tau Alpha; Vice-pres. Scarf Club; Y. W. C. A. 
Women's League; Biology Club; Girl's Club; Pi 
Club; Collegian 



Wagnon, Marie 



Kappa Alpha Theta: Pan-Hellei 
League: Y. W. C. A.; Biology Club 



Indianapolis 



Waldon, Scott 



Delta Tau Delta; Sigma Delta 
legian '28. Ed. '29; Sec. Y. 
Budget Com.; Gov. Board Men': 
Ind. Inter-collegiate Press Assoc. 



Warren, Nan Frances 



Bo swell 

ity Ed. Col- 

A.; Student 
; Band; Sec. 



Tyronza, Ark. 

rollege. Johnson. Tenn.. 
men's League; Thespis; 

Way, Margaret Indianapolis 



Alpha Delta Theta: Milligan College. Johnson. Tenn., 
'26. '27; Y. W. C. A.; Women's League; Thesp.. 
Rido 



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Weaver, Dorotha Indianapolis 

Pi Beta Phi: Metropolitan School of Music 

Weaver, William Mooresville, Miss. 



Welborn, Dorothy 

Kappa Alpha Theta; Eva 
Biology Club; Prop. Com. 
Varsity Basketball 

Wilding, Lucille 



Evansville 

rille College '26. '27: 
neva Stunts: W. A. A.; 



Indianapolis 



Williams, Helen Indianapolis 

Kappa Kappa Gamma 

Williams, Robert Indianapolis 

Sigma Nu; Spanish Club; Chemistry Club; Press Club 



Wilson, Jane Kokomo 

Pres. Campus Club: Pen and Pencil; Rido; Girl's Glee 
Club; Biology Club; Philosophy Club 



Wolf, Eleanor 

Zoology Club 



Indianapolis 



Wood, Irene 



Wood, Juanita 



Greenfield 

al Club; Women's League: Y. W. 

Tyronza, Ark. 

Galloway College '26. '27: Campus 
;om. Y. W. C. A.; Women's League 



Wood, Marjorie 

Alpha Delta Theta: Girl's C 
Women's League: Y. W. C. i 

Zimmerman, Lucille 

Zeta Tau Alpha; Women's Le; 



Indianapolis 

Club; Spanish Club. 

Bridgeport 



Zook, Carrie Mooresville 

Zeta Tau Alpha: Math Club. Classical Club: Biology 
Club; Women's League; Y. W. C. A.; W. A. A. 



Set 









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SOPHOMORE CLASS 

^TRONG believers in "moral" victories, the Sophomores have been de- 
feated in nearly every physical encounter they have had with the Freshman 
class. Worsted in the preliminary class flag scraps, the Sophs soon 
realized they were "in for it." However, by securing a metal flag bearing 
their colors to the top of the flag pole, they were able to hold off the 
yearlings for a short time. 

Then, by a masterful diplomatic stroke the Sophomore leaders ar- 
ranged for teams of equal size to oppose each other in the annual class 
scrap. This destroyed the advantage their opponents had previously had 
because of superior numbers. To make doubly certain, in case of defeat, 
they eliminated all fighting and substituted a tug-of-war. Despite all these 
precautions, however, the invincible rhinies were victorious. 

The second year men then started out to show that their abilities lay 
more in scholastic and social fields. In these respects they were much 
more successful. The Cotillion, their official class dance, was held at the 
Knights of Columbus Hall and was attended by a large and enthusiastic 
crowd. Four Sophomores held associate editor positions on the Collegian. 
Rodney Perkins was elected editor and Merle McCloud business manager 
of the 1929 Drift. Others held offices in various campus organizations. 



|9 




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Edwin Abbett 
Martha Lou Akers 
Oma Belle Alvey 
Eleanor Amos 
Robert Andrey 
Thomas Arnold 



Fred Arzet 
Armen Ashjian 
Wayne Ashley 
Ercil Askren 
Alice Aston 
Grace Avels 



Addie Axline 
Virginia Bailey 
Robert Barber 
Helen Barber 
Feary' Barnes 
Martin Barnett 



Carlyle Bauermeister 
Raymond Baxter 
Jay Beem 
Dorothy Beightol 
Ruth Benefiel 
Forrest Bennett 



Byron Benson 
guy'neth beshoar 
Cecil Bolinc 
George Bott 
Elizabeth Bowman 
Robert Boyer 



Edith Bradford 
John Brewer 
Barbara Bridges 
Marjorie Brown 
Russel Buchanan 
Maja Brownlee 



dortha butz 
Katherine Calwell 
William Caldwell 
Eugene Campbell 
Richard Campbell 
Mary Carriger 



Martha Cheney 
Marshal Christopher 
David Clarke 
Mary Clerkin 
Bertha Corya 
Miriam Cosan 



Louise Cox 
Winifred Davis 
Elizabeth Dawson 
Marjorie Day 
Gertrude Delbrook 
Paul Dingle 




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Rosemary Dyer 
Frances Fames 
Paul Echternacht 
Clarice Ellingwood 
Howard Ely 



Adolph Emhardt 
Jeannette Epler 
Mabel Erganbright 
Elizabeth Evans 
Mary Ewing 
Dorothy Fee 



Joseph Eugene Feeney 
Robert Feuerbach 
Marian Fleming 
Opal Fleming 
Marjorie Fleury 
Virginia Flowers 



Robert Ford 
William Franklin 
Loretta Galm 
Ruth Garrard 
Edith Garrison 
Jack Garrison 



Ralph Gery 
George Gisler 
Marjorie Goble 
Mildred Goens 
Martha Gowdy 
Martha Griffin 



Jennette Griffith 
Kenneth Grimes 
Eleanor Hadd 
Wayne Halford 
Ann Louise Hall 
Robert Hanscom 



Mary Hargitt 
William Hargitt 
Kathryn Haugh 
Mary Lou Haugh 
Jane Hawekotte 
Bonita Heft 



Martha Hensley 
Georgia Holder 
Marjorie Holl 
Raymond Holland 
Steward Holmes 
Doris Howard 



Elinor Howe 
Esther Huber 
John Hughes 
Wilma Hunt 
Curtis Hunter 
Reatha Inman 






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Russell Inman 
Helen Irwin 
Elizabeth Johnson 
Harrell Johnson 
Dorothy Kammerer 
Marian Katterhenry 



William Kendall 
Arlo Kilpatrick 
John Kime 
Margaret Kent 
Lillian King 
Frances Kirkpatrick 



Helen Kocher 
Dorothy Krieg 
Dorothy Lambert 
Hazel Lamkin 
Mary Louise Larmore 
Mary Esther Lawlor 



Leo Lee 
Virginia Lett 
Harriet Lewis 
Francis Levings 
Elizabeth Lindsay 
Mary Mahon 



Albert Marshall 
Fred Martin 
Betty Martindale 
Merle McCloud 
Helen McCoy 
Florence McDonald 



Marjorie McElroy 
Dixie McKay 
Edwin Metcalfe 
Ralph Metcalf 
Clifford Michael 
George Miller 



Mary Elizabeth Miller 
Mary Jane Morris 
Nellie Munson 
Ruth Mushlitz 
Josephine O'Neill 
Annabelle Parr 



Oswand Parsons 
Mildred Payton 
Jessie Peffley 
La Mar Perico 
Pauline Plummer 
Elizabeth Preston 



Acnes Pusinelli 
Edward Raffensperger 
Dorothy Racan 
Frederick Ranney 
Thomas Rhoades 
Alice Mae Rhodes 







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Sara Rhodes 
Bellah Richet 
Mabel Rider 
Norman Robinson 
Ruth Robinson 
dorotht rothert 



Harold Ross 
Ada Irene Rubush 
estelle sadlier 
Charles Sawin 
rosalie schell 
Clara Schrieber 



Margaret Shanklin 
Geraldine Shaw 
Elsie Shelley 
Frances Shera 
Frank Sherer 
Rot Shettle 



Norma Shuttleworth 
Helen Siegmund 
George Smith 
Robert Smith 
Evelyn Snyder 
Margaret Snyder 



Olga Snyder 
Elizabeth Springer 
Robert Stearns 
Helen Stephenson 
Ethel Taylor 
Hugh Thatchor 



Alice Thomas 
Gordon Thompson 
Robert Tracy 
Ruth Triller 
Delma Vestal 
Mary Mildred Voris 

Truth Wakemax 
Margie Waldex 
Evan Walker 
Margaret Walker 
Charlotte Walter 
Margaret Elizabeth 

Wheeler 



Marian Whetstixe 
Robert Whitcraft 
Frank White 
Wallace White 
Charles Whxlams 
Catherine Willis 



Jane Willis 
Martha Wdllis 
Henry Wilson 
Louise Wisehart 
James Woolford 
Beatrice Yates 



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* 







FRESHMEN 

^EVEN hundred students making up the Freshman class this year were 
the largest and most successful group of rhinies that ever graced the halls 
of the university. Starting with the slogan, "in numbers there is safety," 
the yearlings not only kept the amateur barbers of the Sophomore class 
from exercising their talents, but actually won the annual class scrap. They 
were victorious in this latter event in spite of the last-minute shifting of 
rules intended to give the upper classmen a better advantage. 

While waiting the annual Freshman-Varsity gridiron meet, the sup- 
posedly "green" yearlings amused themselves by keeping their emerald 
colors tied securely to the top of the flagpole despite the sporadic raids of 
the defeated Sophomores. After the triumphant class of '31 had run 
rough-shod over the other football men all active opposition to the new- 
comers ceased. Both the scheduled games of the Freshman squad (with 
Culver Military Academy and Lake Forest) were won. The inter-class 
track meet was taken by the Freshmen, and a good showing was made in 
baseball as well as basketball. 

With the end of such an epoch-making first year the members of the 
Class of '31 are looking forward to the time when they can join the ranks 
of upperclassmen and show that theirs is not a case of "beginner's luck." 




Page Eighty-two 



Sims^pres. ; Hoover, vice-pres. ; Schoener, sec; Jolly, treas. 



£-fMffX.fl. V~Q~fl~Q "ff»ti^9~ff£.V»tr 



Josephine Adams 
Louise Adney 
Alberta Alexander 
James Allen 
Mildred Allen- 
Elizabeth Ammermax 

Gordon Arbuckle 
Marion Archer 
Mary Armstrong 
Mildred Arnholter 
Theodosia Arnold 
Mark Ashley 

Paul Ashley 
James Bailey 
Seward Baker 
Virginia Ballweg 
Geneva Banker 
Charles Barbe 

Edith Barbour 
Margaret Barker 
Marion Barnard 
Emily Barnes 
John Barney- 
Bertha Baron- 
Pauline Barrett 
Martha Barry 
Margaret Bartlett 
Martha Batchelor 
Helen Bauchman 
Frederick Baumgartner 

Reuben Beabout 
Mildred Beadle 
Mary Louise Beem 
Dorothy Behmer 
Edna Biery 
Frances Blomberg 

Robert Boesinger 
Francis Boston- 
Margaret Bradburn 
Catherine Brandt 
Iris Irene Branigix 
Canis Brockway 

Boyd Brown- 
Hazel Brown- 
Robert Brown 
Marjorie Brownlee 
Beatrice Burcan 
robert butterworth 

Dorothy Canary 
Cortland Carrincton 
Hilda Carroll 
Josephine Carter 
Virginia Carter 
Howard Caulfield 

Josephine Chancellor 
Genevieve Clark 
Harry Clark 
Mary Lou Clark 
Ralph Clark 
Martha Cobler 




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Elizabeth Cochran 
Pauline Coffin 
Anne Condron 
Chester Corwin 
Thomas Cory 
Dorothy Coverdill 

Irene Cravens 
Harold Dahl 
Elizabeth Dalman 
Malcolm Davidson 
Betty Jean Davis 
Lawrence Davis 

Virginia Davis 
James Dawson 
David Day 
Enola Deane 
Priscili.a Demler 

AlLEEN DEUSCHE 

Alice Dickey 
Cora Mae Dilts 
Mildred Dirks 
Elizabeth Dodson 
Margaret Doriot 
Robert Dunlavy 

Eleanor Durbin 
Dorothy Durnell 
Jean Duthie 

Isabelle Early 
John Eastes 
Robert Egley 

Helen Eiser 
Pauline Elvers 
Ruby Eveleth 
Thomas Everson 
Frank Fairchild 
Wayne Farrow 

Elma Ferguson 
Elsa Fisher 
Helen Fisher 
Maxine Foltzenlogel 
Lena Fortney 
Clarence Frazier 

Margaret Frissinger 
Dorothy Fromer 
Melba Fulk 
Thelma Fulkerson 
Bertha Furstenberg 
Margaret Gabriel 

Elizabeth Gaddy 
Thelma Gahan 
Granville Geisert 
Henry Gibson 
Elsie Gilkison 
Constance Glover 

Lester Godby 
Mildred Goepper 
Byron Ellis Goetz 
Theodore Greatbatch 
Hilda Griffith 
Naomi Guild 






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John Hack 
Claribel Hacker 
Jane Hall 
Vera Hallihan 
Mary Halstead 
Mary Marcaret Ham 

William Hantzis 
Harriet Harding 
Margaret Harrison 
Claude Hatfield 
Gladys Hawickhorst 
Phylis Hawkins 

Charles Hayes 
Roberta Hayes 
Virgil Hebert 
Virginia Hecathorne 
Harriet Henderson 
James Hesser 

Charles Heuss 
Alice Higman 
Lena Hild 
Alice Hill 
Martha Hill 
Miriam Hillman 

Virginia Hill 
Hubert Hinchman 
Iris Hinshaw 
Gertrude Hoch 
Elizabeth Hodges 
Roland Hole 

Hilda Hollingsvvorth 
John Hood 
Mary Hoover 
George Horst 
Anna Lee Howell 
Phillip Hufford 

Richard Hucgins 
Charles Hughes 
Lucille Hughey 
Ora Hutchens 
Robert Hutto 
Thelma Ivins 

Dudley Jackson 
Beatrice Johnson 
Mary Johnson 
Theodore Johnson 
Walter Johnston 
Edward Jolly 

Berwyn Jones 
Maxine Jones 
Ruth Jones 
Helma Kahn 
Francis Kelley 
Gretchen Kemp 

Ruth Kennedy 
Dorothy Kepner 
Lucille Kern 
Grace Kibbe 
Jack Kincsolver 
Katherine Kinnaird 




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Marie Kirk 
Alice Kiser 
Mildred Klein 
Helen Koehne 
Glen Lake 
Elizabeth Lamson 

Violette Lanning 
James Larmore 
Elsie May Leslie 
Ruth Lindemann 
Bernice Livincstone 
Georce Lloyd 

Catherine London 
Charles Long 
William Mackey 
John Manaugh 
Esther Manges 
Betty' Jean Margileth 

Harold Marks 
Nance Marsh 
Katherine Matthews 
Marcella Matthews 
Howard May 
Clifford May 

Carol Mayborn 
Mariel Maze 
William McCarthy 
Ruth McClurg 
Earl McCormick 
Mildred McCormick 

Robert McCoy 
William McDowell 
Ralph McElroy 
Clausen McKim 
Gladys McNally 
Madge McPherson 

Mary Louise Medaris 
George Meid 
Valentia Meng 
James Meyers 
Josephine Million 
Mary Mills 

Helen Miller 
Mildred Milner 
Ruel Moore 
Elinore Moran 
Elizabeth Morris 
Kenneth Mount 

Zoralice Mount 
Catherine Murdock 
Herbert Murnan 
Robert Murnan 
Elizabeth Myers 
Martha Nauer 

Sara Neffer 
Margaret New 
Howard Newhouse 
Frank Newkirk 
James Nicely 
George Nulf 









• 


















Elsie Null 
Harold O'Dell 
Lawrence O'Dell 
Edward Ocborne 
Jack Ohler 
Lynn O'Neill 

Ruth Otte 
Gretchen Overleese 
Roger Overleese 
Janet Pascoe 
Edward Patrick 
Doris Paul 

Elma Paul 
Virginia Perkins 
Beaulah Phillips 
Evelyn Pier 
Imogene Pierson 
Lillian Pierson 

Thomas Pierson 
Dora Polen 
Lloyd Polen 
Harry Pogue 
Esther Quick 
Sam Rabin 

Ruth Raffensperger 
Ernest Re a 
Louise Reddick 
Stanley Reddick 
William Redding 
Adelaide Reeves 

Florence Renn 
Morton Renn 
Cleon Reynolds 
Emma Lou Richter 
Jane Riddell 
Thurman Ridge 

Edward Ridlen 
Katherine Rinehart 
Melburn Roach 
Zelda Robey 
Florence Rothert 
Louise Rundell 

Janice Ryan 
Miriam Schad 
Marthalou Schoener 
Robert Schoff 
Margaret Schumacher 
Donald Scott 

Dorothy Screes 
Gerald Sharrer 
George Shelby 
Anne Shelton 
Leona Sherman 
Lois Sherrill 

Alice Shirk 

WlLHELMINA SHIRTZ 

John Shugart 
Wendell Shullenbercer 
Harrison Sibbit 
Lydia Simpson 












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Madge Simms 
Wallace Sims 
Joseph Sivak 
Boyce Small 
Ernestine Smith 



Dorothy Squires 
Geneva Stalcup 
Oran Stanley 
Robert Steger 
Lillian Steinmetz 



William Stonebraker 
James Strahl 
Mildred Sullivan 
Ellsworth Sunman 
Harriet Swain 
Morris Swain 

Ruth Tegarden 
Norman Thompson 
Paul Thompson 
Wilma Thompson 
Mary Thumma 
Russell Townsend 

Margaret Tremain 
Myra Trili.er 
William Vance 
William Vandivier 
Harold Vehling 
Genevieve Verbarg 

Arthur Viall 
Virginia Wakeman 
Robert Waldon 
Flora Walters 
Ralph Walton 
Dale Weaver 

Annalee Webb 
Jane Wells 
Charles Whipple 
Max White 
Virginia Whitlock 
Edward Wilson 

Lucile Wood 
Reginald Wood 
Vascoe Woodard 
Margaret Woodfill 
Charles Wilcox 
Urban Wilde 

Nita Williams 
Thelma Williams 
George Winkleman 
John Woddell 
Richard Wolfe 
Lucille Wright 



Kathryn Yeaman 
Crawford Yeazel 
Donald Youel 
Lois Young 
Katherine Zimmerschied 









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GEORGE "POTSY" CLARK 

Director of Athletics 

Athletics have an educational value, and we 
hope to promote the interest not only of the 
players who take part but also of the spectators 
who watch our games. We believe the new field 
house and stadium will aid materially in the de- 
velopment of community spirit. 

George "Potsy" Clark 



Page Ninety-two 






HMMMMMk»#^-ftHMM^*^HMMMMMMMMMMM 




COACHING STAFF 

GEORGE "POTSY" CLARK 

C7KORGE "POTSY" CLARK took over the athletic directorship in 
September 1927, coming here from the University of Minnesota, where 
he was assistant football coach and head baseball mentor. From his 
programme of athletics and his ability as coach and director, it is axiomatic 
that Butler is on its way to the forefront in athletic competition. "Potsy's" 
main business is football, but besides his duties as athletic director he is 
head football coach. Last spring he assisted, also, in coaching the varsity 
baseball squad. A brilliant career as quarterback under Zuppke at the 
University of Illinois, where he was graduated in 1916, was climaxed by 
his selection as all-Conference quarter in his senior year. George Huff, 
Illini athletic director, has said that Clark was one of the greatest athletes 
ever at Illinois. Upon graduation he became head freshman coach at the 
University of Kansas for a year, after which he joined the American 
Expeditionary Forces. In the 89th Division he coached basketball, base- 
ball and football. Under his tutelage and play at halfback the 89th won 
the A. E. F. football championship. After the war he returned to his 
alma mater as backfield coach under Zuppke and head baseball mentor. 
A year later he became head football coach at Michigan State College. 
From there he went again to the University of Kansas as head grid coach 
and in the summer of 1926 resigned to become assistant football and 
head baseball coach at the University of Minnesota. From Minnesota 
Clark came to Butler. 

PAUL H INKLE 

Coach Clark's athletic endeavors are supported by the strongest 
coaching staff of which any school in the state may boast. The foremost 
member of the group is Paul V. Hinkle. Hinkle has had complete con- 
trol of the destinies of the basketball squad for the past two seasons and 
each year has directed his proteges to a state championship. The records 
made by his teams surpass the endeavors of any collegiate group in 
Hoosierdom. Not only has Hinkle gained recognition in Indiana, but 
the conduct of his teams in winning the majority of scheduled contests 
against the formidable opposition of Big Ten foes has gained Hinkle 
fame throughout national athletic circles. Besides his duties in directing 
the basketball men, Hinkle has charge of the golf team and assists Clark 
with the football squad each fall. Hinkle is a graduate of the University 
of Chicago. 



Page Ninety -three 






?*4MMMMMMT»* 



»4MMMMfr-*-& ^#~»"l»"*"ft"IMM^A"*"*"#"#"*"fi 









ROBERT NIPPER 



Robert Nipper, Butler '26, set up an enviable career as a three- 
letter athlete while attending the university. Upon his graduation Nipper 
was appointed head freshman coach of basketball, football and baseball. 
His appointment to the position of varsity baseball coach for 1929 was 
announced recently, as well as having charge again of freshman basket- 
ball and football. 



NEIL HYDE 



Neil "Cowboy" Hyde for two years was Doc Spears' best guard 
at the University of Minnesota. Last year he was engaged by Clark as 
line coach of the Bulldog eleven, and the 1928 season will bring him 
here for his second year. 



RALPH HITCH 



Ralph L. Hitch, Butler '27, joined the staff of the athletic depart- 
ment last September as graduate manager of athletics. He has had 
charge also of publicity for that department. 



ARCHIE CHADD 



Archie Chadd, Butler '28, captain of Butler's 1928 state champion 
basketball team, has been selected as assistant varsity basketball and head 
freshman baseball coach. He has been a two-letter man throughout his 
Butler career and will probably assist Nipper with rhinie football candi- 
dates this fall. 
















fr-ft-ft-a-fl^-a-ft-a-ft-a-ft-a-fl-fl-a-ft-ft-a-A-ft-ft-A 







BUTLER UNIVERSITY SCHOOL OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

UlRECTLY responsible for the erection of the new $600,000 Butler 
Field House and the Stadium is the recently organized Butler University 
School of Physical Education and Athletics. This incorporated body of 
forty-one Indianapolis business men and financiers, alumni and friends of 
the university was formed October 12, 1927, shortly after work on the 
Field House had begun. Cooperating with the university Board of 
Directors and other executives, this corporation has control of Butler's 
athletics. Through its efforts an expansion of the physical culture pro- 
gram aiding the individual student will be inaugurated with the moving 
of the university to Fairview. 

Immediately upon its incorporation the school took complete charge 
of the construction of the mammoth athletic plant and guaranteed com- 
pletion of the Field House before the end of the 1928 basketball season 
by leasing it to the Indiana High School Athletic Association. The 
annual high school basketball tournament was held in March. The lease 
stipulates that ten state high school tourneys, beginning in 1928, will be 
played in the Butler Field House. The structure, with its seating capacity 
of 15,000, was completed in time for the Notre Dame game March 7. 
Since the opening for that game was informal, the Field House will be 
dedicated December 21, when Purdue will meet the Bulldogs. Of field 
houses in the country built primarily for basketball, Butler University 
has the distinction of possessing the largest. 

Concurrent with the direction of the construction of the Field House, 
the incorporated body planned and arranged for the building of the 
second unit of the athletic plant — the Stadium. Excavation began in 
March, and it is scheduled to be in use for the 1928 football season, 
which opens October 13 with Franklin playing. The day will be a fitting 
first anniversary for the School of Physical Education and Athletics. 
Dedication of the Stadium will take place November 10 at the game with 
the University of Illinois. Expenditure for the "bowl" has been estimated 
at $750,000. Its seating capacity when fully completed will be about 
75,000; however, the first section, which will not be enlarged for a few 
years, will seat 45,000 people, having sixty rows of seats on all sides. 



Page Ninety-five 



♦4MMMMMMMMMM 



~&~&~&~&~6~*"&~&~&~&~&"&~&'6~&~&~&"&»&'~&~&~&-'&~l~&~&~to»4 






The forty-one incorporators of the school are William G. Irwin, 
Arthur Jordan, A. M. Rosenthal, Dr. Carleton B. McCulloch, Arthur 
V. Brown, Hilton U. Brown, Frederick M. Ayres, Louis J. Borinstein, 
Fred G. Appel, D. R. Sinclair, Guy A. Wainwright, Brodehurst Elsey, 
James A. Perry, A. Kiefer Mayer, Samuel B. Sutphin, Nicholas H. Noyes, 
Roy C. Shaneberger, John R. Kinghan, John G. Appel, G. Barrett Moxley, 
L. L. Goodman, Alex R. Holliday, Edgar H. Evans, Norman A. Perry, 
Emsley W. Johnson, James A. Trimble, John W. Atherton, Jacob H. 
Wolf, Charles Ayres, Jr., Peter C. Reilly, J. I. Holcomb, Louis M. Hues- 
man, Walter C. Marmon, Frank D. Stalnaker, Roy E. Adams, Hugh 
McK. Landon, Richard Fairbanks, A. G. Snider, John E. Spiegal, Lee 
Burns and William K. Smith. 

Officers of the corporation are Arthur V. Brown, president; Norman 
A. Perry, vice-president; John W. Atherton, secretary and treasurer; 
John E. Spiegel, assistant secretary and treasurer; and William G. Irwin, 
assistant treasurer. 




Pugc Ninety-six 



Panorama View of Stadium Under Constructio 





















HARRISON "RED" COLLIER 

Football Captain 

^_yONTRARY to the custom of previous years at Butler the election of 
a football captain for 1927 was a post-season event. The leader of a 
Bulldog gridiron eleven for a particular year had 
been chosen hitherto at the close of the preced- 
ing season. The new system called for the ap- 
pointment of a game captain before each contest, 
this honor being assigned to men who had done 
especially good work in practices before games. 

The captaincy for the season 1927 thus came 
to depend more on what the prospective captain 
actually had accomplished and less on what he 
might accomplish during the next football season. 
On the basis of his excellent record at half-back 
during the three years of his activity on the 
Butler varsity elevens, Harrison "Red" Collier, 
of Wilkinson, was the outstanding candidate for 
the honorary captaincy. His team mates showed 

their appreciation of his performances by according him their unaminous 

vote. 




RED COLLIER 












Page Ninety-eight 






FOOTBALL SCHEDULE, SEASON OF 1928 

Oct. 6 Northwestern at Evanston. 

Oct. 13 Franklin, Here. 

"Opening Game." 

Oct. 20 Danville Normal, Here. 
"Home-Coming." 

Oct. 27 Washington University of St. Louis, Here. 
"Indianapolis Day." 

Nov. 3 Ball Teachers' College, Here. 

Nov. 10 University of Illinois, Here. 
"Dedication Game." 

Nov. 17 Earlham, Here. 

"Dad's Day." 

Nov. 27 Tufts College of Boston, Here. 
"Thanksgiving." 




Top Row— Assistant Coach Paul D. Hinkle, McClaflin, Kilgore, Bugg, Gearheart, Glunt, 

Schmedel, Floyd, Meeker, Leichty, Worth, Southern, McMahon, Collyer, Neil Hyde, Line 

Coach; George "Potsy" Clark, Head Coach. 
Second Row — "Wee Willie" McGill, Trainer; Naftzger, Meek, Clarke, Hosier, Cottrell, 

Bauermeister, J. Deinhart, Geisert, Haggard, Benson, Paul, Brown. 
Bottom Row — Cain, Leet, White, Collier, Fromouth, I. Deinhart, Nulf, Fredenberger, Baker, 

Chadd, Watford. 

Page Ninety-nine 






























BUTLER: 46 

Muncie Normal: 12 






FOOTBALL 

Football fans received their first im- 
pression of a Clark-coached machine when 
Captain "Red" Collier led his teammates 
to oppose the Muncie Normal eleven in 
the opening game on Irwin field. Due to 
the fact that the season was started a 
week earlier than customary, the intense 
heat proved a handicap to both teams. 
Although the Muncie Teachers held the 
Blue and White squad scoreless during the 
first quarter, the Bulldog backs, led by 
Alonzo Watford, sophomore protege of 
Coach Clark's, "opened up" and pushed 
three markers across the goal line in the 
following period. Persistent plaving reg- 
istered three more touchdowns in the third 
quarter and, before the contest had ended, 
Butler had accumulated a 46-12 score. 





CAPT. COLLIER 



£ 






«s 






I 









Page One Hundred 







BUTLER: 58 

Valparaiso : 



FOOTBALL 

Neither a muddy gridiron nor being 
outweighed by the Valparaiso football 
team could stop the Bulldogs in their sec- 
ond game on Irwin field and they repeated 
their performance of the previous week, 
this time winning by a score of 58-0. 
Speed in the backfield and ability of the 
linesmen to open great holes in the Val- 
paraiso line were the factors responsible 
for the lopsided score. Coach Clark sub- 
stituted freely throughout the game in 
order to give all his men an opportunity 
to perform against collegiate competition. 
Captain Collier and Nulf, second string 
signal caller, proved to be the most adept 
ground gainers, while Watford again led 
the scoring with three touchdowns. 
Weather conditions eliminated an aerial 
attack and forced the team to depend upon 
football tactics alone. 





\UERME1STER 




Page One Hundred and One 









K.«-«MV»-fr-«-«*-«-«-^-ti-«-»^*»«*'^ 















Illinois : 
BUTLER 



FRE3ENBERGER 








FOOTBALL 

The Bulldogs tasted of defeat, and of 
bitter defeat, for the first time, upon their 
invasion of Memorial Stadium. Coach 
Zuppke had his Illinois aggregation, 
which were later to be crowned Big Ten 
Champions, at its best when he sent 
it against Coach Clark's men. The 
Illini formed an outfit much too heavy 
and too powerful for the Blue and White 
squad to afford much opposition. In spite 
of the fact that the Butler men battled at 
the best of their ability throughout the 
hour, the Illinois backs plunged at random 
through the Butler line and skirted the 
Blue end effectively for numerous gains. 
The fifty-eight point margin which the 
Illini held at the end of the contest came 
as the result of their superiority in every 
department of the game. 








SOUTHERN 



Page One Hundred and Two 




BUTLER: 

Franklin : 






FOOTBALL 

Franklin was selected to provide the 
Blue and White squad with opposition 
before the Homecoming crowd and did it 
so effectively that the score stood 7-7 at 
the end of the contest. Early in the game, 
a Franklin recovery of a fumble in Butler 
territory paved the way to an early score 
for the Baptists. The terrific offensive 
play of Coach Clark's men was matched 
by the defensive tactics of the Franklin 
team and only after a determined drive 
down the field in the second period were 
the Bulldogs able to push across the 
touchdown which tied the score. Desper- 
ate attacks during the second half enabled 
Butler to come within striking distance of 
their goal several times. The stubborn 
Franklin defensive refused to be repulsed, 
however, and Butler was never able to 
gain the narrow margin which separated 
her from victory. 





>~<ya> 








Page One Hundred and Three 






BUTLER : 

DePauw: 












3* 

as 



25 
6 





FOOTBALL 

A fighting and aggressive spirit had 
much to do with the 25-6 defeat which 
was handed the DePauw eleven on Irwin 
field, October 25. Although the teams 
had battled to a 6-6 tie before the end of 
the first half, the offensive battle which 
the Blue and White squad displayed in the 
third quarter netted three touchdowns in 
such quick succession that the Methodists 
were left without a chance to even the 
score. In the final period, DePauw's de- 
fensive stiffened and withstood the Butler 
attack for the remainder of the game. In 
this contest, FYedenberger and Clarke 
made their debut as guards in the shifted 
lineup which came as a part of Coach 
Clark's extensive drill after the Franklin 
battle. 










Page One Hundred ai 






9t 



9 M 9 M $ M 9 M ff M fM^tt"V M 9~tf ~ f - 8~ tf~ ffr~fl~ tMJ~tM?" •$• 



















FOOTBALL 

Sweeping end runs by Lombard's speedy 
backs, who followed perfect interference, 
were responsible for Butler's first defeat 
of the year on Irwin field. Although 
Butler opened the scoring in the first pe- 
riod, when Watford crashed through from 
the one yard line, following an effective 
aerial attack which advanced the ball from 
the twenty-two yard line, Coach Bell's 
outfit tied the score before the close of 
the quarter. After the Bulldogs had made 
an unsuccessful bid for a second touch- 
down in the third period, Fromuth punted 
to Nichols who eluded all tacklers and 
scored after a 54 yard run. Lombard's 
third touchdown came early in the final 
period, and Coach Clark immediately in- 
serted a squad of substitutes whose threat 
to score was cut short by the final gun. 




Lombard : 
BUTLER: 



19 








Page One Hundred and Five 



^«f^tf»*tf M 1N1fr'-tf M 1>'-tf~tf~1f~tf^ r—f^t^fN^fl^fN^fl^tJ**!^^^ 












BUTLER: 

Wabash : 



13 
6 





FOOTBALL 

Wabash proved to be a fit foe with 
whom to mark the end of gridiron activity 
on Irwin field. In spite of the fact that 
the Cavemen were favored to spoil the 
day's program with a misplaced portion 
of the scoring, Captain "Red" Collier 
scampered across the goal line twice to 
give Butler a 13-6 advantage over the 
Little Giants. Three minutes after the 
initial kickoff, Collier received a pass and 
raced fifty-five yards for the first touch- 
down. Wabash carried the ball into But- 
ler territory and had evened the score 
before the end of the quarter. An effec- 
tive aerial attack in the second quarter 
placed the ball within striking distance. 
A pass, Fromuth to Collier, gave the lat- 
ter the opportunity to smash over the line 
with the winning touchdown, the last of 
his collegiate career and the last on Irwin 
field. 





Page One Hundred and Si 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 

When Coach Robert Nipper took his freshman squad to Culver for 
their first game of the 1927 season, the rhinies were greeted by a snow 
covered field. In spite of the weather handicap, the Bull Pups presented 
a formidable attack against the Cadets and before the end of the game 
were standing at the long end of the 26-12 score. Hinchman went around 
the Culver right end early in the game for the first touchdown. In the 
second period Cavosie got away for a forty yard run after recovering a 
fumble. 

In the third quarter the rhinies displayed more football tactics than 
are often seen in collegiate games. After Allen had carried the ball to 
the two yard line on eight consecutive line plays, Hinchman plunged over 
with the third touchdown. Cavosie and Davies also scored in this session. 
Culver's offensive strength was at its height in the final quarter when the 
Cadets scored their only points. 

Similar weather conditions were encountered by the freshmen when 
they played at Lake Forest Academy. The ground was hard and slick 
and often it was difficult for the men to keep on their feet. Cavosie's 
fifty-five yard pass in the opening period promised to pave the way 
for a touchdown had it not bounced out of Crosby's arms. The only tally 
of the game came in the second quarter after Cavosie ran seventy-five 
yards aided by perfect interference from punt formation. 




Top Roiv — Hitch, mgr. ; Meyers, Lesher, Wolf, Fair, Gaerte, Kilgore, Bredell, Roberts, Trees, 
Maidenburg, Allen, Nicely, Godby, Johnston, Trees, Nipper, coach. 

Second Roiv — Dorman, Crosby, Schopf, Davidson, Ullery, Hood, Strahl, Eastman, Rozelle, 
Walsh, Puett, Murphy, Davidson, Murnan. 

Bottom Row — Woddell, McCarty, Dahl, Davies, Reynolds, Kilpatrick, Nulf, Mikesell, Sibbitt, 
Be bout. 



Page One Hundred and Seven 










CCYEAL 




•$~»tf'-1?~$'-<?l~f?~ff 6»«^*-fJ»*V**W* ,, V"W-^ M V M fJ*-tl-V**V*^V , -0'' 1 ^ 






* 






ARCHIE CHADD 

Basketball Captain 

/^T THE close of the basketball activities for 1926-1927, Archie 
Chadd was elected captain of the team for the succeeding season. Chadd 
had been aggressiveness personified during that 
season and exhibited a brand of close guarding 
that kept several much feared opponents in the 
background as far as scoring was concerned. 

f^^ Chadd proved himself worthy of the honor 

Slt^l conferred on him during the 1927-1928 season. 

* His spectacular dribbling, his dogged persever- 

ance and his constant display of energy put "pep" 
into the whole team when opponents were weaken- 
ing from the fast pace set by the Bulldogs. Chadd 
devoted his entire efforts to playing good basket- 
ball during the season, and his success was a 
natural consequence. He was instrumental in his 
high school athletic career toward bringing his 
home village, Bainbridge, into the spotlight of 
basketball fame. 

During the ensuing year, Chadd has been engaged as assistant varsity 
basketball and head freshman baseball coach of Butler University. 





ARCHIE CHADD 



Page One Hundred and Twelve 









%-ft 



t\ 



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«1 



•I 



SB I 



ttl 






BASKETBALL SCHEDULE, SEASON OF 1929 

December 13 — Pittsburgh, here. 

December 21 — Purdue, here. 

January 1 — North Carolina, here. 

January 3 — University of Missouri, here. 

January 5 — Chicago University at Chicago. 

January 1 1 — Franklin, here. 

January 18 — Evansville, here. 

January 25 — DePauw, here. 

February 8 — Wabash, at Crawfordsville. 

February 1 1 — Franklin at Franklin. 

February 15 — Notre Dame, here. 

February 22 — DePauw at Greencastle. 

March 6 — Wabash, here. 

March 9 — Notre Dame at South Bend. 



Top Row — McGill, trainer; Hitch, mgr. ; Bugg, Hildebrand, Holz, Hinkle, head coach; 

Nipper, asst. coach. 
Second Row — Chandler, Jackman, Floyd, Hosier, Eaton, Allen. 
Bottom Row — M. Christopher, White, Chadd, capt. ; C. Christopher, Fromuth. 

Page One Hundred and Thirteen 



& 


















CAPT-ELECT WHITE 



CAPT CHADD 



BASKETBALL 



^MATCHING wits and abilities with the best teams of the state and some of the out- 
standing quintets of the country during the past year, the Bulldog netmen were so successful 
that they carried the title of Indiana intercollegiate champions to the Butler campus for the 
second consecutive season. Eight state opponents were met in fifteen contests and in all but 
two conflicts the Blue and White fives bested their zealous foes. 

Central Normal of Danville was the first aggregation to put to test the strength of the 
Hinklemen but after the two quintets had battled on fairly even terms for the major part of 
the contest, the Bulldogs spurted in the last ten minutes to swamp the Teachers by a 49-22 
score. A week later, at Madison, the Butler forwards found themselves unable to connect 
with the basket. Dr. Meanwell's Wisconsin squad exhibited some commendable long-range 
shooting to clinch their 25-18 triumph. However, on the following night, Hinkle and his 
men returned to Ft. Wayne where a 50-10 beating was administered the Concordia outfit. 

Lafayette was the scene of a double bill with Purdue. The Reserves romped through 
the opening contest, winning 24-19, but when the second battle of the evening had been 
finished, Butler was trailing 36-27. Both teams exhibited an effective defense which resulted 
in a 16-16 deadlock at the end of the first half. With only five minutes to play, Butler was 
holding a five point lead. Murphy began tipping them in from under the basket and his 
counters soon placed the Boilermakers out in front. 










At Wabash, Crawfordsville 



Paqe One Hundred and Fourteen 



I 















CHANDLER 



BASKETBALL 

Muncie Normal opened the Butler home card when they raced into a five point lead 
with less than five minutes to play. Only a whirlwind attack, staged in the final minutes, 
was responsible for the 39-34 score at the conclusion of the tilt. At Chicago, three days later, 
Butler experienced a similar situation. The Windy City team held a slight lead throughout 
the contest, only to relinquish it in the last minute of play, when Chadd sent one bounding 
through the hoop from the center of the floor to clinch a 25-24 victory. 

Although Butler led Evansville, 11-4, at the half, steady playing enabled the Aces to tie 
the score before the close of the regulation period and then to force the fray into a double 
overtime contest. In the second of the extra periods, Hildebrand's four field goals assured 
the Butler squad of their 38-32 victory. Franklin, keyed to stop the onslaught of the 
Hinklemen, displayed an alert and aggressive attack which enabled them to play on even 
terms with the visiting Bulldogs for the greater part of the contest. Butler's last minute 
attack again piled up the points necessary for the 40-32 victory. 

Friday, the thirteenth of January, was just another Friday excepting that it marked 
the second victory of the season over Evansville. In this contest, at the Armory, Butler 
found things much easier than in the previous conflict. The Bulldogs were off to an early 
lead, which they held to the final gun when the score stood 33-27. DePauw proved to be 
too meager in opposition for the efforts which were expended by Hinkle's team. After 



At Loyola, Chicago 






Page One Hundred and Fifteen 







%^^#HI^^^#^#^^^HM^I^^^^^^^#^^Hl^^"#'Hk'# 






HILDEBRAND 



BASKETBALL 



holding an eleven point lead at the half, the Blue and White forwards boosted the score 
to 36-19 before the close of the game. 

Danville Normal provided one of the speediest games of the season when it held Butler 
to a two point lead throughout the initial period. In the final half, the quick breaking Blue 
and White offensive play mounted the score to 34-25. Butler opened its February activities 
by nosing Wabash out of a 28-26 decision. The Cavemen, presenting an unexpected but 
effective attack, forced the Butler net snipers to their limit throughout the contest, and only 
stalling tactics employed in the last three minutes of play enabled the Bulldogs to retain their 
scant lead. 

Clever passing and hall handling were aids in toppling Marquette, 23-20, on the Bulldog's 
second invasion of the Badger state. Two days later, the Hinklemen met the Loyola five 
on the Chicago school's floor where their flashy defense held the Windy City cagers to 
six field goals. This 27-17 defeat was the first that the Loyola quintet has suffered on their 
home floor since 1925. 

Butler's most furious hardwood encounter came when the Blue and White met Notre 
Dame on the South Bend floor. The Irish were off to an early lead, but after the Hinklemen 
had connected a few times they showed signs of controlling the play. However, Notre Dame's 



Notre Dame, At Field House 



Page One Hundred and Sixteen 




i •$«fl~fl~fl~1f''»$~® 





















CHRISTOPHER 



BASKETBALL 



impenetrable defense held the Bulldogs to long or hurried shots and kept them trailing, 32-2+, 
at the close of the contest. 

Three home games finished the February schedule. All were decisive victories over 
teams which had already been beaten on their own floors. Franklin was the first to 
succumb, the Bulldogs holding a 29-21 verdict. Although Wabash started out much after 
the same style employed at Crawfordsville earlier in the season, it was not long before the 
powerful defense had smothered the basket-shooting attempts of the Little Giantsand gained 
a 35-22 victory. A battle with Marquette resulted in complete submersion of the Wisconsin 
rivals and meant a 53-13 game for the Hinklemen. At Greencastle, Butler tripped the 
DePauw quintet, 32-27, to make a clean sweep of the games with the three traditional rivals, 
Franklin, Wabash and DePauw. 

Wednesday evening, March 7, Butler dedicated its new Field House at Fairview by 
defeating Notre Dame, 21-13, after one of the greatest defensive battles that has ever taken 
place in the Capital City. After battling for three-fourths of the hour on practically even 
terms with the Irish, the fast breaking offensive tactics of the Hinklemen netted ten points 
and enabled the proteges of Koegan and Hinkle to deadlock their season's hostilities. 

The freshman cagers faced a full basketball schedule and won two of their four games 
with state freshman foes. Franklin fell by the wayside in two contests, but DePauw and 
State Normal each took a decision from Nipper's squad. 




Field House 



* 



Page One Hundred and Seventeen 












^t^OHt 
















Page One Hundred and Eighteen 






l~A~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~fr&^~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~fr'&'»&>4 r 



WALTER FLOYD 

Baseball Captain 

\_JNK of the most consistent of Butler athletes during the past four 
years has been Walter Floyd, who captained while a senior the most 
successful baseball team at Butler in several years. 
"Walt," as he is commonly known about campus, 
played baseball under the regimes of three 
coaches — "Pat" Page, Coach Paul Hinkle and 
"Wee Willie" McGill, Mentor during the 1926 
season. Most of this time he was in the center- 
field position. 

In football, "Walt's" second major sport, he 
excelled to such an extent that the largest vacancy 
in Coach Clark's line for the coming season will 
have to be filled — that of the center post. Basket- 
ball found Floyd holding down substitute floor 
guard and back guard positions. Floyd's reward 
for consistent and dependable playing has already 
been offered and accepted. He will coach base- 
ball and football at the new Washington high school on the West side 
next fall. 




WALTER FLOYD 



Page One Hundred and Twenty 









%«#^#HI^^#^#^^^#^#H»^#^^ft^HIHMI^#^#^#Hk#^antt^HI* 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE, SEASON OF 1928 

— University of Wisconsin, here. 
14 — Purdue University, at Lafayette. 
— University of Illinois, at Urbana. 
— University of Minnesota, here. 
— Muncie, at Muncie. 
— Notre Dame University, here. 
— Indiana Central, here. 
— Indiana Central, at University Heights. 
— DePauw, here. 

— Indiana State Normal, at Terre Haute. 
— Notre Dame, at South Bend. 
— Indiana State Normal, here. 
— Muncie Normal, here. 
— DePauw, at Greencastle. 



April 


4 


April 


13, 


April 


17 


April 


23 


April 


24 


April 


28 


May 


1 


May 


7 


May 


8 


May 


11 


May 


22 


May 


24 


May 


26 


May 


29 








H 



Top Row — Hitch, mgr. ; Nipper, Clark, coach; Hinkle, coach;. 

Second Row — C. Christopher, Fredenberger, Meyers, Hildebrand, Cain, Caskey, White, Nulf. 
Bottom Row — Unger, Bauermiester, Floyd, capt. ; McGill, trainer; Fromuth, Collyer, Chadd. 

Tagc One Hundred and Twenty-one 










CAPT. FLOYD 



BASEBALL 



w. 



66 

EE WILLIE" McGILL, former trainer of Bulldog athletic teams and himself a 
baseball player of national fame, appeared in the role of coach at Butler for the first time 
when he and Coach Clark took charge of the diamond aspirants in March, 1928. The baseball 
team faced a schedule which included five contests with Big Ten teams and ten with 
Indiana college nines. 

Last year's team, with the exception of ex-Captain Woolgar, reported to McGill as well 
as a number of promising men who held berths on last year's rhinie squad. Of the latter 
group Hildebrand, Nulf, Myers and White made appearances on the varsity nine throughout 
the season. Hildebrand's twirling was largely responsible for the early season victories of 
the Bulldogs when, backed by the perfect fielding of his teammates, he held the batsmen of 
the opposing teams to a few scattered hits. 

Wisconsin put the Blue baseballers to their season's first test when the two teams met 
on Irwin field, April 4, but the Big Ten batsmen succumbed to Hildebrand's twirling while 
the Butler nine was busy scoring four runs. The second encounter with a Big Ten outfit 
was thwarted when rainy weather necessitated the cancellation of a double header on April 
13 and 14 at Lafayette. 



r -&-tt"ft"tt"ft"&» * 




HILDEBRAND 







Notre Dame, Washington Park 
Page One Hundred and Twenty-two 
















C. CHRISTOPHER 



BASEBALL 



Butler's first set back came at the hands of the University of Illinois nine when the 
Illini unmercifully hit the offerings of the Bulldog moundsmen to run up a 14-1 score. 
Minnesota visited Irwin field for the final Big Ten game on the Butler schedule and with 
the score standing 2-2 the game was called on account of rain. 

Thereafter began Butler's competition with Indiana college teams. After losing the 
first two games of this group to Muncie Normal and Notre Dame, the Butler squad swept 
a series of six games, two with Indiana Central and one with each of the following schools: 
Indiana State Normal, DePauw, Illinois reserves and N. A. G. U. 

Muncie had an easy time winning when their eleven hits, aided by eight Butler errors, 
accounted for a 13-4 score. In a feature game with Notre Dame at Washington Park, the 
Bulldogs succumbed to the Irish attack, 9-2, after the rally of the South Bend squad in the 
fifth inning accounted for six runs on a quartet of hits and three errors. 

Indiana Central invaded Irwin field May 1, and from them Butler won a 3-1 game 
which started their string of victories. Hildebrand gave the University Heights team only 
three hits throughout the contest, holding them scoreless after the first stanza. On the 
following Saturday the Blue and White team banished the Illinois Reserves at Champaign, 
5-3, with Hildebrand again working on the mound. 




Notre Dame, Washington Park 

Page One Hundred and Twenty-three 



SL* 










B \UER.\1IESTER 



FRECEN'BERGER 



BASEBALL 



When the hostilities with Indiana Central were renewed, the Bulldogs added another 
triumph to make it three in a row, this time winning 9-0. When DePauw played at Irwin 
field, the Methodists earned seven hits, but were able to chase only one run across the 
plate, and Butler squeezed out a 3-1 victory. Indiana State Normal and N. A. G. U. fell 
in quick succession. The Teachers took a 3-1 beating on their own field while the local 
Gymnastic Union lost an Irwin field contest when Collyer smacked one out of the ball 
yard with two men on bases. 

At South Bend, the Irish repeated their success of the first meeting and took a 9-3 
decision from the Bulldogs after Jachym had allowed only four hits during the contest. 
Hildebrand was on the mound when Indiana State Normal visited Irwin field. The 
Teachers solved "Hildy's" delivery for only three hits but the outcome of the game was 
not decided until the last of the ninth when the lengthy pitcher cracked a long hit to center 
field fence to score the winning run. 

Muncie Normal came to Irwin field and found things just reversed to what they had 
been in the first battle at Muncie. The Blue and White team opened with two tallies in the 
first inning and stood on the long end of the 6-0 score at the close of the game. To conclude 
the season, the Blue and White squad defeated DePauw, 2-1, in a return game — making a 
record of ten games won and four lost for the team. 




V 






Central Normal, Irwin Field 
Page One Hundred and Twenty-four 









!£* 







COTTRELL 



MCCII.L, Coach 



FRESHMAN BASEBALL 

^_^OACH NIPPER'S baseball squad spent long hours in perfecting their 
game, but were able to compete in only one contest throughout the season, 
thus, their single victory over the Culver nine enabled them to finish the 
year with a perfect record. However, numberless victories over local 
teams in practice contests helped to increase the accomplishments of the 
first year men and provided opportunity for a display of their diamond 
ability. Parrish and Nulf were the co-captains of the rhinie squad. The 
men who received numerals were Reynolds, Hinchman, Steger, Meid, 
Wolfe, Halford, Arbuckle, Maidenburg, Dean, O'Conner, Nulf and 
Parrish. 




Waseda, Irwin Field, ('27) 

Page One Hundred and Twenty-fire 






W^w-fM 



^A^^A^^#^ft"ft"ft"^# w » w ll^ w ^ft^^#^^^#"# < -'# ,, *#' v ft w #* , 'ft^ 

















track 



#-fl*MMMMMMM 









W^^^^^HI^#^^Ht«^^#^ft^^^H^A^^^^^^^H^ 



HAROLD HOLZ 

Varsity Track Captain 

I |AROLD HOLZ turned in the most worth while record of all the 
junior members of the 1927 track squad and was selected to lead the 
cinder team during the past season. Holz proved 
to be one of the highest scorers in the dash and 
hurdle events, climaxing his collegiate career by 
being the only Butler man who scored any points 
in the state track meet. 

Besides performing on the track, Holz 
earned a letter for his work as a member of the 
basketball team. During the last year he per- 
formed as a regular center and was one of the 
high individual scorers. Holz was considered one 
of the star performers who played on the Frank- 
fort high school team in recent years and during 
his inter-scholastic career received the distinction 
of being chosen center on the all-state team. 

As a two-letter athlete of more than usual merit, Holz's career on 
the track and basketball floor has proved invaluable in making athletic 
history at Butler in recent years. 




HAROLD HOLZ 



Pcir/e One Hundred and Twenty-eight 





















SPRING TRACK SCHEDULE, SEASON OF 1928 

Mar. 17 — Illinois Relays, at Champaign, 111. 
(Called off) 
— Interclass Meet, Here. 
— Interfraternity Meet, Here. 
— Earlham, Dual Meet, at Richmond. 
— Indiana State Normal and Indiana Central, 
Triangular Meet, Here. 
27-28 — Drake Relays, At DesMoines, Iowa. 
— DePauw, Dual Meet, at Greencastle. 
— Culver vs. Butler Freshmen, at Culver. 
— Little State Meet, at Greencastle. 
—Rose Poly, N. A. G. U. and Butler, 
Triangular Meet, Here. 
May 18 — DePauw Freshmen and Butler Freshmen, 
Dual Meet, at Greencastle. 
19 — State Meet, at Lafayette. 

8-9 — National Intercollegiate, at Chicago. 
23 — Olympic Trials, at Detroit. 



Mar. 


21 


Mar. 


28 


Apr. 


14 


Apr. 


21 


Apr. 


27 


May 


4 


May 


4 


May 


12 


May 


15 



May 
June 
June 



mh 








.AM 


IA~ *J 








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» 



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Holz Wins 100-yard Dash. Triangular Meet April 21 

Page One Hundred and Twenty-nine 



l"Q'*Q*Q'*f) , «& 



TRACK 






| HE 1928 track season was more or less one of ups and downs, for 
although the Blue and White squad, under the direction of Coach Potsy 
Clark, won two triangular meets and dropped a like number of dual 
events, it would have had a much more successful season could it have 
added to its personnel two men who could win in the jumping events and 
another successful weight tosser. Captain Holz, White, and Yeager per- 
formed satisfactorily in the dashes and hurdles while the number of points 
annexed by McCormack and George were instrumental in swelling the 
Butler scores. In the field events Bugg and Thompson were the only 
men who could be depended upon as point gainers. 

Earlham, Butler's first opponent of the 1928 season, outclassed 
Coach Clark's proteges in the majority of the field events at the Richmond 
track and forced the Blue and White squad to drop the meet, 72-54, 
although the Bulldogs swept the majority of the high honors in the running 
events. Captain Holz won both the 100 and 220 yard dashes while 
McCormack, sophomore member of the Butler team, bested the Quaker 
entrants in the quarter and half mile runs. Of the remaining four firsts 
which added to the Butler score, two were earned outside the races, one 
when Bugg won the shot and the other when Thompson tied for first 
place in the pole vault. 

In the first meet on Irwin field, Butler entertained Indiana Central 
and Indiana State Normal. Although the Blue and White squad led 







White Wins 220-yard dash. Triangular Meet May 15 
Page One Hundred and Thirty 



TRACK 

from the first event to the last, their failing to gain points in the field 
events allowed the Greyhounds to bring their total to within a fraction of 
a point short of the Butler score. 

Butler partook in only one relay event of National importance — the 
Drake relays — and in that Holz, Yeager, White and Leet composed the 
quartet which annexed third place in the half mile race. 

The track squad took part in two meets at Greencastle, first in a 
dual meet with DePauw and later in the Little State meet. The 
Methodists trounced the Clarkmen by a lopsided score in the dual meet 
when DePauw men took all the places in the field and weight events 
excepting three thirds. At the Little State meet Butler won fourth place 
aided by Yeager's first in the high hurdles and two second places won by 
Captain Holz, one in the century dash and the other in the low hurdles. 

Rose Poly and N. A. G. U. made up the opposition which met 
Butler in the last meet on Irwin field. Butler won the event in a handy 
style with the Engineers placing second and the N. A. G. U. athletes 
trailing in third place. 

The State meet at Lafayette where Captain Holz, Yeager, White, 
Leet, Bugg, McCormack and George were the only Butler entrants con- 
cluded the activities of the Blue and White tracksters for the 1928 season. 







Yeager Wins High Hurdles. 



Triangular Meet April 21 

Page One Hundred and Thirty-one 















* 




BUTLER UNIVERSITY 
OLYMPIC ENTRANT 

|~|eRMAN PHILLIPS, Butler '27, reaffirmed 
his athletic eminence in qualifying for a berth on 
the united States Olympic team July 5 in the pre- 
liminary trials at Philadelphia. He is one of a 
four-man team representing Uncle Sam in the 
400-metre run and is the only Olympic entrant 
carrying with him the name of Butler University. 
Joe Sivak, freshman track, luminary, after qual- 
ifying for the final trials at Boston, won his pre- 
liminary heat in the 1,500 metre run but failed to 
gain an Olympic entrance when he ran fifth in the final race, which was 
won by Ray Conger in record breaking time. 

Since his graduation Phillips has been running under the colors of 
the Illinois Athletic Club in numerous indoor and outdoor races through- 
out the country. One of his recent accomplishments was at Columbus, 
Ohio, when he beat Ray Conger in a special half-mile race. "Flip," as 
Phillips is intimately known, gained eminence through his winning for three 
consecutive years the national intercollegiate 440-yard run, the first time 
any one runner has been 440-yard champion for three successive years. 
He has run nine 440-yard races under :49 in official competition and 
claims that as a record. His workouts this spring and summer have been 
held on Irwin Field. 



HERMAN PHILLIPS 













Herman Phillips (foreground) training on Irwin Field 
Page One Hundred and Thirty-two 






FRESHMAN TRACK 



As part of the annual field day between the Butler freshmen teams 
and the Culver Military Academy squads at Culver, the rhinies succeeded 
in defeating the Cadets on the track for the first time since the two schools 
have held hostilities. Allen and Sivak led the Bullpups, annexing two 
firsts; while Urbains, Jones, Cavosie, Murnan, Hurbertz and Hatfield 
gained points in several events. The mile relay team composed of Fair- 
child, Sivak, Gardner and Seeright bettered the Culver relay quartet. 

With the rhinies showing their strength in the field events and 
sweeping all places in the shot put, high jump, discus and javelin throw, 
the freshman team won its second and last meet of the season from the 
DePauw freshmen. Allen again led the scoring with three first places, 
while the remaining members of the team scored numerous points in all the 
events. 

Freshman Cross Country 

Butler's only cross-country team in 1927 was made up entirely of 
freshmen. They downed the DePauw varsity harriers early in the season 
in a practice run when Sivak broke the tape ahead of the Methodist 
runners. On Thanksgiving day the rhinie squad was entered in the annual 
Y. M. C. A. meet at Louisville. Urbains led the freshmen to victory this 
time while other Blue and White runners collected third, fourth, fifth 
and sixth honors. 










Butler Freshmen vs. DePauw, Practice Meet 

Page One Hundred and Thirty-three 




miner 
sports 












R-'A'-flH 












3g 



"TOMMY" WILSON 

Tennis Captain 
§§T 

1 OMMY" WILSON, Bulldog Tennis captain for the past two 
years and a junior on the squad, finished his second year on the varsity 
as one of the leading tennis players in the state 
and middle west. After failing to lose a single 
set all season during the regular scheduled 
matches, he journeyed to Terre Haute and won 
the singles title of the Indiana Intercollegiate Con- 
ference and paired with Marshall Christopher, 
number two man on the varsity, to win the 
doubles title. 

Wilson has experienced a steady rise in 
Hoosier tennis circles for the past five or six 
years, having gained much popularity four years 
ago, when he defeated Sandy Weiner, a protege 
of William T. Tilden, in the National Clay Court 
Championships held here that year. Playing on 
the Ellenberger Park courts since first starting the 
game, Wilson has risen to be a serious threat to 
all state championship contenders. Last year he reached the semi-finals 
of the City Tennis Tournament at Indianapolis, only to be defeated by 
Johnny Hennessey, Davis Cup star. This year he reached the finals 
against Julius Sagolowsky, former Bulldog captain. 

In his two years of intercollegiate competition Wilson has yet to lose 
a singles match. This year he paired with Christopher, and the two played 
as number one doubles team. The pair had no difficulty in finishing the 
season undefeated, including the doubles championships of the state at 
Terre Haute. 



[ 


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EL* .•• i- 



TOMMY WILSON' 









Page Our Hundred and Thirty-six 



>V~*~9"*~*~*~*~9-1~9~*~&*~9~W^~9"*~9~*~*~*~1~&*«*"+ 










M. CHRISTOPHER 



TENNIS 



f^APTAIN "TOMMY" WILSON, Orbison, Sherer, Christopher and 
Chandler finished the 1928 tennis season by winning nine of their ten 
matches against collegiate competition besides annexing the state cham- 
pionship in both the singles and doubles events. The only blemish on their 
record came when Purdue won the final set of the Butler-Boilermaker 
match to win by a 4-3 score. 

Two contests with the Indiana University squad were called off, and 
a third cancellation dispensed with the scheduled St. Xavier match. Double 
victories over Muncie Normal, DePauw and State Normal head the 
Bulldog record, while Indiana Central, Cincinnati University and Franklin 
each succumbed to the ability of the Butler net stars in a single contest. 

Only three matches were scheduled for the first year tennis squad. 
Of this number it defeated the Wabash rhinie team, tied with the Culver 
quartet and then tied with the Cavemen in a second encounter. Horst, 
Carrington, Bley, Sunman and Dunbar received freshman numerals. 




Left to Right — Wilson, capt. ; Orbison, Prof. Haworth, coach; Chandler, M. Christopher, Sherer. 

Page One Hundred and Thirty-seven 









£ M 




CAPT. HANNA 





CAPT. HANNA, COOK, COPE 



COPE TEEING OFF 



GOLF 



l): 



NDER the direction of Coach Hinkle, the golf 
team this year faced a schedule of six matches. Al- 
though the Blue and White stylists won only one of 
their matches, their opposition composed some of the 
most formidable collegiate aggregations in the state. 
Indiana held a double victory over the Butler squad 
while Purdue was victorious in a single contest. De- 
Pauw lost their match at Indianapolis but evened the 
score by defeating the Butler quartet at Greencastle. 
Through the endeavors of the athletic department the 
Indiana Conference championships were played at the 
Highland country club, the first time that the state 
capital has ever entertained the state title aspirants. 
Cook, Cope, Hanna and Dailey represented Butler in 
the championship tournament. 




Top Row — Carter, Dailey, Lane, Kilpatrick, Youel, Boyer, Tracy, Caldwell. 
Bottom Row — Cope, Hanna, Cook. 

Page One Hundred and Thirty-eight 



















Phi Delta Theta Basketball Team 
PHI DELTA THETA BASKETBALL 

Sigma Chi and Phi Delta Theta fought to a tie for first place in the 
annual inter-fraternity tournament. Each had lost only one contest after 
completing the round-robin schedule which was followed. But, when 
the Sigma Chis found things too strenuous in the Greek trophy battle, the 
Phi Delts won their second championship of the year. 

PHI DELTA THETA FOOTBALL 
The Greek organizations at Butler are anxious, of course, to gain 
trophies, but the most desirable athletic award which may adorn the 
mantel of any fraternity house is the cup awarded to the champion football 
squad. In October the Phi Delta Theta gridders raced to year's cham- 
pionship by downing the Chi Rho Zeta, Sigma Chi and Lambda Chi Alpha 
teams in quick succession. The Lambda Chi team was runner up in the 
championship series. 



Page One Hundred and Forty 



Phi Delta Theta Football Team 



•W fc, w* - W**W'* , W* ,, w' 







* 



•••*tf*-ff»-'fl-*fl»*1l«4f»''fl~©» 













Chi Rho Zeta Track Tear 



CHI RHO ZETA TRACK TEAM 
Chi Rho Zeta surprised the majority of the inter-fraternity athletic 
followers by romping away with the track championship. This year both 
varsity and freshmen varsity men were allowed to compete under their 
fraternity colors, adding much interest and enthusiasm to the event. 
Lambda Chi Alpha ran a close second to the winners, with Phi Delta 
Theta and Delta Tau Delta tying for third place. 

SIGMA CHI BASEBALL 
Sigma Chi showed the remaining Greeks on the campus how base- 
ball should be played and in doing so won for themselves the champion- 
ship cup and the laurels which accompany it. When the champions met 
the Sigma Nu team in the last game of the inter-fraternity season, they 
boasted a perfect record. Delta Tau Delta took second place honors. 
















Sigma Chi Baseball Team 



Page One Hundred and Forty-one 










womens 
athletics 






















WOMEN'S ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 



Ei 



)UTLER Women's Athletic Association promotes school spirit, greater 

participation in athletics, and more interest in the physical education of 
women students. It maintains a point system by which a woman student 
participating in athletics may be awarded three distinct honors. The first 
honor is a W. A. A. pin for having acquired four hundred points, the 
next a monogram for seven hundred points and third a sweater for 
one thousand points. In order to become a member of W. A. A. a 
woman athlete must earn one hundred points and also maintain fifty ad- 
ditional points for each year. The points are obtained by playing on class 
and varsity teams, by entering extra gymnasium classes and by placing in 
the tennis and golf tournaments. 

Coach Schulmeyer, as a result of her unusual interest in promoting 
women's athletics, maintains two cups to be awarded to intramural basket- 
ball and volleyball teams when they have won the series three times. They 
are known as the Schulmeyer cups. 

The W. A. A. Staff includes: Virginia Hampton, president; Evelyn 
Seward, vice-president; Bertha Green, secretary; LaRue Hale, treasurer; 
Katherine Price, basketball assistant; Clara Foxworthy, volleyball as- 
sistant; Elizabeth Fullenwider, tennis assistant. 




Hampton, pres.; Seward, vice-pres. ; Green, sec; Hale, treas. 
Page One Hundred and Forty-four 















^a^a-a-a-a-a-a-a-a ^a-a^-a^a-a'-a-a-a-'a-a-a-'j ft-* 



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PERSONNEL WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 

J_JNDER the direction of Miss Louise Schulmeyer and her assistant, 
Susie Harmon, women's athletics at Butler are keeping pace with the 
extended athletic programme of the university. Intra-mural and class 
contests have become major events with a greater number of girls par- 
ticipating each season. Basketball and volleyball are the chief sports, with 
swimming, track, tennis, hiking, golf and archery increasing in popularity. 
Classes in folk dancing, games, drilling, and swimming are held twice 
a week. 

With the new gymnasium and the athletic facilities to be had at 
Fairview, women's athletics will assume more importance and will take 
in a larger field of sports. 

Coach Schulmeyer has planned an extensive women's athletic pro- 
gramme which will surpass any that Butler has ever had. Elaborate 
plans have been made for the classes of instruction. Folk dancing, clog- 
ging and eccentric dances will be taught. Regular classes in swimming and 
diving will be held throughout the entire year. Girls will be given greater 
opportunity to participate in sports and a wider field of activity in this 
line will be provided. Games will be scheduled with other colleges in 
Indiana and tournaments will be held. With these and other added 
features, women's athletics will undoubtedly increase in popularity and 
value along with the other departments of the university. 










f 







Left: 

LOUISE SCHULEMEYER, 

Director 



Right: 



SUZIE HARMON, 
Asst. Director 




Page One Hundred and Forty-five 



I* 
I* 






~&~&"j~&~&~i~&~l<»&~&~i~irfr + 













WOMEN'S ATHLETICS 



w< 



OMEN'S athletics at Butler University have experienced a remark- 
able impetus in the past few years. Not only has the growing interest of 
women students of the university contributed to the growth of the depart- 
ment, but much of the credit must be given Miss Schulemeyer and her 
assistant, Suzie Harmon. 

An extension of the programme of women's sports now includes a 
variety of activities including tennis, swimming, track and archery. 
Swimming classes have been conducted for several years at the Y. M. C. A. 
and local athletic clubs, where credit is given by the department. Archery 
was introduced to the classes in gymnasium for the first time this spring. 
An extension of this programme is planned when the university is moved 
to its new location at Fairview, where the future erection of a women's 
gymnasium is planned. 

Besides the varied minor sports which are now offered, competition 
in varsity basketball and volleyball are available to the woman athlete. 
Inter-sorority games, with independent teams competing, are a part of the 
W. A. A. yearly schedule. 













First Row — Price, Deal, Schulemeyer, coach; Baldauf, Glover. 
Second Row — Thome, Seward, Robinson, Welbourn, Fullenwider. 



Page One Hundred and Forty-six 
















Independent Volleyball Team 

INTRA-MURAL VOLLEYBALL 

I EN volleyball teams were organized soon after the basketball season. 
The games took place every Wednesday and Friday for two months, and 
each game consisted of one set which in turn was made up of three games. 
The team winning two or more of the games in the set was declared the 
victor of that contest. The Independent team won the series after a hard 
season, with Delta Delta Delta coming in second. Katherine Price was 
the captain of the victorious team. By the quick action of its players and 
their unusual serving the Independent team was able to come out first 
in the series. Clara Foxworthy assisted Miss Schulmeyer as the W. A. A. 
representative. 



* 




















Sophomore Basketball Team 

VARSITY BASKETBALL 

l^UE to their outstanding work on the class and intra-mural teams the 
following girls were selected for the varsity basketball team; Mae Deal, 
Clara Foxworthy, Elizabeth Fullenwider, Katherine Price, Ruth Robinson, 
Evelyn Seward, Lorene Thorne, and Dorothy Welbourn. Katherine 
Price was elected captain. The varsity up to and including this season has 
been a purely honorary team as it does not play any games. However, 
plans have been made to compete with teams next year. Games will be 
scheduled with other universities throughout the state. 



9> 



i 




Varsity Basketball: Seward, Price, Melbourn, Foxworthy, Baldauf, Thorne. 

Page One Hundred and Forty-eight 



« 
















Freshman Basketball Team 

INTER-CLASS BASKETBALL 

lOR the second time the class of '29 won the Inter-class Basketball 
Championship. The tournament consisted of a play-off of two games 
between each class, the Junior's supremacy being threatened seriously only 
by the Freshmen, who finished the season in the runner-up position. 
Katherine Price, captain of the winning team, was the outstanding player 
at all times, leading her team to straight victories. The first year players 
showed unusual ability and, although they were never able to defeat the 
Junior team, they gave them keen competition. Frances Boston was 
captain of the Freshman team. 




Gymnasium Class 



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Page One Hundred and Forty-nine 

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4 










Kappa Alpha Theta Basketball Team 

INTRA-MURAL BASKETBALL 

| HIS year the Schulmeyer cup, awarded to the victorious team in the 
intra-mural basketball series, was won by Kappa Alpha Theta for 
possession during the year 1928. Delta Delta Delta came in second in 
the series. The winning team played throughout the series without losing 
a single game. Their excellent pass-work, accuracy of making baskets 
and superior team work, enabled them to surpass every other team in the 
series. 







Junior Basketball Team: Price, Hampton, Lawson, Thorne, Fullenwider, Hale, Deal, Sohl. 
Page One Hundred and Fifty 




























Tennis Team: Fay, Kurzrock, Green 

TENNIS 

Because of an early and extended rainy season the spring tennis 
schedule was not completed. Those girls still in the running were : Miriam 
Fay, Margaret Elrod, Bertha Green, Denise Kurzrock, Evelyn Seward 
and Ruth Robinson. 

SWIMMING 

Swimming classes were held twice a week at the Indianapolis Y. W. 
C. A. during the second semester. These classes were open to all Butler 
girls participating in athletics. Although no actual team was chosen, the 
outstanding swimmers were: Katherine Price, Ruth Robinson, Barbara 
Bridges, Opal Fleming and Maja Brownlee. 







v 












Swimming Class Y. W. C. A.: Brownlee, J. Hall, Ragan, Jones, A. Hall, Bridges, Fullenwider. 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-one 













* 






f 



-*~*"&~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~A~&~*~&~*~a~*~*~*~i~*~*» * 










PHI KAPPA PHI 

^%EMBERSHIP in Phi Kappa Phi is the reward given students for 
high attainment during their entire college course in scholarship. This 
honorary society was founded on the Butler campus in 1922. Twice a year 
students from the upper fourth of the senior class are chosen by the faculty 
members of the society. Those elected to Phi Kappa Phi the first 
semester usually attain an average of ninety and above. This year these 
students are: Jane Ogborn, Margaret Elrod, Virginia Barnes, Irene 
Bowers, Mary Boyd, Mary McCormick, Mrs. Grace Meyer, Elizabeth 
Ann Miller, Adalai C. Moore, Virginia Small and Margaret Woessner. 
The students in the second group are: Gertrude Grainger, Waide Price, 
Hattie Krueger, James Taylor, Anna Conway, J. C. Harger, Margaret 
Hackleman, Zeno Vandover, Helen Tomlinson, Eleanor Wallace, Frank 
Furstenberg and W. T. Harger. 

Officers elected for 1928-1929 are: Prof. Henry M. Gelston, presi- 
dent; Prof. Milton D. Baumgartner, vice-president; Helen Hoover, secre- 
tary; and Prof. A. Dale Beeler, treasurer. 













Top Row — Barnes, Bowers, Boyd, Conway, Furstenberg, Grainger. 
Second Ro<w — Hackleman, Harger, Kreuger, McCormick, Meyer, Miller, Moore. 
Bottom Row — Ogborn, Small, Tomlinson, Underwood, Vandover, Wallace, Woessner. 
Page One Hundred and Fifty-four 

























p. 



SCARLET QUILL 



ERHAPS the most coveted goal for enterprising and ambitious under- 
class coeds is Scarlet Quill, a senior honorary for women. Scarlet Quill 
was founded in 1921 with the idea of petitioning Mortar Board in the 
future and since then has stood for the highest standards in scholarship, 
interest in activities and development of personality. At the end of their 
junior year, any number of women, not to exceed twelve, may be chosen 
on the basis of scholarship, activities and personality to perpetuate the 
work and ideals of Scarlet Quill. 

Under the capable direction of Jane Ogborn, president, and Mrs. 
T. G. Wesenberg, faculty advisor, Scarlet Quill has contributed materially 
to the development of a "greater Butler." Its most noteworthy contri- 
bution is the awarding of a scholarship to the most worthy sophomore 
girl for her junior year. The scholarship was given this year to Lucille 
Turner, whose average was the highest in her class. A benefit bridge 
party is given each year to raise money for this fund. 

Scarlet Quill — in cooperation with Blue Key — has for several years 
sponsored the Butler Homecoming celebration. Both organizations 
choose the judges, who decide on the best float in the downtown parade, 
or the most artistically decorated fraternity house. 



Top Row — Ogborn, pres. ; Ross, vice-pres. ; Helmer, sec; Hooker, treas.; Bowers. 
Second Row— Elrod, Green, Kelley, Orloff, Roller. 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-five 













» 






1 






i 







CHIMES 

^_^HIMES, the junior honorary society for women, was founded in 1924, 
under the auspices of Women's League by Dean Evelyn Butler, for the 
purpose of acquainting freshmen girls with the fundamentals of college 
life. 

Every spring eight Sophomore girls are chosen on the basis of activi- 
ties, personality and democracy to carry on the work for the following 
year. At the annual Gridiron Banquet, a razz affair held at the Columbia 
Club April 9, the following girls were "spiked" with the silver and gold 
ribbons of Chimes: Maja Brownlee, Bertha Corya, Betty Evans, Virginia 
Flowers, Eleanor Hadd, Bonita Heft, Dorothy Lambert and Dorothy 
Ragan. Dorothy Pier, president, was toast-mistress. The other officers 
are: vice-president, Virginia Hampton; secretary and treasurer, Helen 
DeVelling. 

Before the opening of college in the fall, each girl entering for the 
first time receives a letter from "Chimes" welcoming her to Butler. 
"Vouchers," chosen from prominent junior and senior women, assist the 
Chimes "colleagues" in helping the Freshmen with the problems they meet 
during registration and their first few days at Butler. During the year, 
several teas and parties are given for the freshmen girls. 




I* 



l» 









Top Roiu — Pier, pres. ; Bartley, Campbell, Davis, DeVelling, Hampton, Lyons. 
Second Row — Seward, Batty, Fay, Green, Higgins, Ogborn, Ross, Smith. 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-six 













fl 






PHI DELTA PHI 

RGANIZED in 1920 with the essential purpose of fostering the true 
and fundamental principles of democracy and good fellowship, Phi Delta 
Phi has held an important place among Butler's honoraries for women. 

Membership is composed of two sophomores from each sorority and 
two from non-sorority women, chosen on the basis of excellence in scholar- 
ship, womanliness and service. In keeping with its idea of promoting good 
fellowship among Butler women, it sponsors an all-coed event each year. 
This is the Kid Kaper, first given in 1921, which was held this year on 
April 25 in the gym. All girls in the school are invited to come dressed 
as children. Lollypops — rompers — short socks — pigtails and hair bows 
are quite the fashion, as are the latest dance steps. This party is always 
one of Butler's gayest, for every girl seems to enjoy living over her child- 
hood days at least for one evening. 

Phi Delta Phi was also one of the seven groups on the campus to 
contribute to the fund to send a delegate to the Pan-Hellenic Conference 
at Pittsburgh. 



Top Row — DeVelling, pres.; Bingham, Campbell, Falvey, Kelley, Kistner, Lyons, Reeves, 

Seward. 
Second Row — Sohl, Davis, Delbrook, Evans, Flowers, Hargitt, Haugh, Heft, Holder. 
Third Row — Lambert, Lett, Malloch, Plummer, Ragan, Sadlier, Shera, Walker, Wilding. 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-seven 



I* 
I* 







mm H m 




SCARF CLUB 

^_yOMPOSED of freshmen and sophomore women, Scarf Club — an 
honorary organization — was founded in 1921 at Butler with the purpose 
of promoting good fellowship and cultural pursuits and of bringing about 
increased student body support of campus activities. Membership is lim- 
ited to one girl from each fraternity and an equal number of non-fraternity 
girls selected on a basis of significant participation in school activities, 
spirit of cooperation, school loyalty and leadership. 

The club holds various social functions throughout the year. Two of 
these are given for all freshmen girls. This year the first was a tea in 
the fall, and the second was a St. Patrick's tea dance held at the dormitory. 
For several years the girls have helped with the May Day festivities. 
Dressed in white, no matter what the thermometer may register nor what 
the color of the sky may be, they serve the May Day breakfast out of 
doors. At Christmas time the girls do charity work among the needy of 
the city. Their well-filled baskets bring cheer to many homes during the 
holiday season. 






• 







First Row — Hester, sponsor; Hadd, pres.; Epler, Hollingsworth, Williams, Hall, McPherson, 

Shera, Schad, Dawson. 
Second Row — Pascoe, Arnold, Brannigen, Dodson, Avels, Dalman, Miller, McDonald, Evans. 
Third Row> — Howell, Mock, Kahn, Clinehens, Withers, Thomas, Lindenborg. 

Page One Hundred and Fifty-eight 






%~fl 







THETA SIGMA PHI 

^OUTSTANDING ability displayed by women in journalism is honored 
by election to membership in Theta Sigma Phi, national honorary pro- 
fessional journalistic fraternity for women. Pledge ribbons are lavender 
and green, tied around a pen, which is in the form of a gold matrix. 

In March, 1927, Alpha Iota chapter of Theta Sigma Phi was in- 
stalled at Butler by Miss Sara L. Lockwood, national president. Before 
its installation, the organization was known as Scribblers Club. Next 
fall the Theta Sigs are planning to give their first Matrix table, an 
elaborate formal function at which important writers are guests and 
speakers for the occasion. Other guests include faculty and prominent 
students around school. Every Theta Sigma Phi chapter is expected to 
hold a Matrix table each year. 

All Theta Sigs are working or have done work on the Collegian at 
some time. Those who have been busy with other newspaper work this 
year are: Margaret Elrod, Jean Davis, and Louise Eleanor Ross, all of 
whom are writing for local publications. 



I* 










Top Row — Ross, pres. ; J. Campbell, Elrod, Lampel, Kelley. 
Bottom Row — M. Brownlee, Corya, J. Davis, Benning, Hall 






Robinson. 
Page One Hundred and Fifty-nine 









%^||^^^^^#^^^HI'H^A < H^^HI^^HI^#^#^^^-^^# | ^# 




4| 



SIGMA DELTA CHI 



Pi 



'ROFESSIONAL men's journalism fraternity, Sigma Delta Chi, was 
organized at DePauw in 1909 and founded on the local campus in 1926. 
Since its formation at Butler the fraternity has fostered and aided the 
remarkable work being done in the journalism field at the university. 
Two special editions, the twenty-four page paper, which was distributed 
at the Indiana High School basketball tourney, and the Homecoming 
edition of the Collegian were both published under its auspices. Also, 
the enlargement and more frequent issuing of the paper has been made 
possible by the work of members of the organization. 

Besides work in the newspaper field the fraternity is also active in 
promoting worthwhile activities on the campus. The members sponsored 
a concert given by the Men's Glee Club which was presented at the 
Irvington school auditorium March 29. 

The Butler chapter cooperated with the DePauw chapter in giving 
the annual Sigma Delta Chi Founders Day banquet at the Hotel Lincoln 
April 17, at which Meredith Nicholson and the national president of the 
fraternity, James A. Stewart, spoke. 



Top Row — Scheleen, pres. ; Carvin, Gearheart, Gremelspacher, Helms, Howenstine, Roach. 
Bottom Row— Ross, Waldon, Walker, Prof. DeForest O'Dell, Asst. Prof. J. Douglas Perry, 

Herbert Hill, Robert Harrison. 
Page One Hundred and Sixty 






* 




■ 













SPHINX 



K: 



'EPRESENTATIVES of the national Greek letter fraternities on the 
campus organized in 1920 and received a charter to Sphinx Club from the 
Wabash chapter the following year. The membership consists of under- 
graduate men who have succeeded in distinguishing themselves in some 
form of collegiate activities. The pledge insignia is a black and white rib- 
bon, worn on the coat lapel, and the active badge of the organization is a 
golden sphinx head. 

Sphinx fosters inter-fraternity relationship and endeavors to promote 
a spirit of cooperation among fraternities, for the advancement of school 
spirit. It arouses interest in campus activities by sponsoring all-school 
events. The annual Urbana pilgrimage has been promoted largely by 
Sphinx Club, which has charge of the sale of tickets for the Butler-Illinois 
football game. 

At the end of the school year, Sphinx annually awards a trophy to the 
member of the football team esteemed the most valuable. The faculty is 
responsible for this selection, which is announced at the close of school. 




Top Row — Walker, pres. ; Strickland, vice-pres. ; Gearheart, sec. and treas. ; Brown, Cook, 

Finney, Gremelspacher. 
Second Row — Hollingsworth, Hufford, Nail, Tudor, Caulkins, Chandler, Clarke. 
Third Row — Haggard, Lewis, Orbison, Pitts, Paul, Schmedel, Smitson. 

Page One Hundred and Sixty-one 




























BLUE KEY 



Ei 



_SLUE KEY founded in 1924 at Gainsville, Florida, established its 
twentieth chapter last year at Butler. The organization was started at 
the Florida university by B. C. Riley, and became a national fraternity in 
February, 1925. Within two and one-half years, it has expanded until it 
now has chapters in forty-one colleges and universities. Skulls chapter of 
Blue Key is a junior-senior organization, and members are elected on the 
basis of achievement and interest in campus activities. They are pledged 
in the fall semester and wear the blue and gold ribbons, the insignia of the 
club. Service is the fundamental principle, underlying the general purpose 
of promoting school spirit and fostering a closer bond of relationship be- 
tween the faculty and students. The local chapter was originally founded 
in 1920 by Pat Page for the purpose of promoting fellowship among "B" 
men and to encourage scholarship especially among the freshmen athletes. 
Blue Key and Scarlet Quill have, for several years, cooperated in 
sponsoring the activities connected with Home-coming Day. Since this 
organization has received its national charter the prestige of the college 
in its program of expansion has been greatly increased. 










Top Row — H. Collier, pres. ; G. Collyer, vice-pres. ; Cottrell, Chadd, Davis, Helms. 
Second Row — Holz, sec. and treas. ; Hutchinson, Scheleen, Beem, Bugg, Daily. 
Third Row — Dienhart, Hebert, Higgins, McDowell, Meek, Nulf, Shepperd. 

Page One Hundred and Sixty-two 





















■•:■ 

31 : ; 






— 










































BAND 

TT HEREVER and whenever Butler is holding a celebration, the Butler 
band is always near — attired in its blue uniforms. This year the organiza- 
tion, in charge of J. B. Vandaworker, has presented many programmes 
which have helped bring the name of Butler before the public's attention. 
The band went on a concert tour of Northern Indiana this year and was 
well received by its audiences. 

More than fifty members are enrolled for this work which has been 
placed on the basis of a one hour elective credit arrangement. The band 
plays at all the football and basketball games and frequently broadcasts 
Butler programmes over WF'BM in addition to the Radio Bureau's weekly 
university radio hour. 

This year the band inaugurated the policy of presenting its senior 
members with Butler sweaters. The first to receive this honor were 
Brazier Beecher and Kent Beecher. 

At the June Carnival the band followed its usual custom of giving a 
concert before the pageant. With Butler at Fairview the band, having 
played at the dedication game with Notre Dame at the new Field House, 
promises to increase its ranks to the desired hundred mark. Henry 
Hebert is student director of the band. 







T l i yililllllUMHIllHll ll ll llll Hl III 

Band Ensemble: J. B. Vandaworker, conductor; Henry Hebert, student director. 
Page One Hundred and Sixty-four 







CAMPUS CLUB 

^/AMPUS CLUB was organized in 1922 by the women in the college 
residence under the guidance of Dean Butler, sponsor, wth the aim of 
promoting good fellowship and scholarship and of upholding the tradi- 
tions existing at the dormitory. 

The club sponsors social affairs that are unique and attractive. Last 
fall the girls gave a clever stunt, entitled "Campus Affairs" on Geneva 
Stunt day. At the Melting Pot Bazaar the club placed third with one of 
the cleverest booths entered. Dressed as bold pirates they guarded a 
treasure chest which was really a grab bag. 

Meetings are held each Wednesday evening. Rulings are made by 
the club and, after being approved by Dean Butler, are put into effect and 
are recognized by the students living in the Residence. 

Because Campus Club is open only to women residing in the dormi- 
tory, the membership has been restricted by the size of the Residence. 
However, with the erection of a new and larger building at Fairview, 
Campus Club should grow in size and influence. 




First Roic — Alvey, Williams, Wilson, pres. ; Lehr, Hays 
Second Roiv — Roe, Lamson, Quick, White. 
Third Roiv — Bolin, Rhoads, Tegarden, Arnold. 



Page One Hundred and Sixty-fine 



■"• 









HHF 










DER DEUTSCHE VEREIN 



D 



'ER DEUTSCHE VEREIN is an organization composed of twenty- 
five students from the German department. The members are chosen by 
Professor and Mrs. M. C. Baumgartner on the basis of ability and interest 
in the German language. Meetings are held on the first Thursday of each 
month at the homes of the various members. 

The club offers opportunity for practise in the fluency of speaking 
German and for acquiring a better understanding of the language. Inter- 
esting and well-planned programs consisting of sketches of Germany, 
short plays, songs, dialogues and short talks are conducted in German. 
Papers are read by members on German traditions and customs, origin of 
German folk songs, German literature and lives of German authors. 

Apart from the monthly meetings, Der Deutsche Verein produces for 
the public a German play. This year "Unter Vies Augn" was given. A 
German Christmas party is held annually for the members, and a picnic 
outside of town ends the activities of the organization each school year. 

This club is sponsored by Professor and Mrs. Baumgartner, Miss 
Tulianna Thorman and Miss Violet Beck. 



*• 



First Row — Prof. Baumgartner, sponsor; Moorman, pres. ; Monninger, Huston, Kreuger, Thiele, 

Mrs. Baumgartner, sponsor. 
Second Row — Stegemeier, Beck, Thorman, Emhardt, Amos, Mallock. 
Third Row — Fillingham, Marshall, Rodebeck, Woelfing, Adolay, Emhardt, Baron. 

Page One Hundred and Sixty-six 





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MATHEMATICS CLUB 

^%ATHEMATICS Club has had two semesters of rather varied ac- 
tivity. Perhaps the most outstanding work of the year has been the 
presentation of a mathematical pageant in the fall. Written by Miss 
Gladys Banes, instructor in the mathematics department, in conjunction 
with one of her classes, the pageant was repeated a second time before 
the Indiana section of the Mathematical Association of America when it 
met here in May. 

Meetings of a social and instructive nature are held by the club once 
each month. The reading of a paper usually supplies the major part of the 
programmes, and musical numbers fill out the evenings' entertainments. 
The papers deal with such topics as astronomy, the history of mathematics 
and biographies of well known mathematicians. Among those read this 
year were one on the "Number System," by Prof. Elijah Johnson, and 
one on the "Einstein Theory of Relativity," by Miss Juna Lutz. 

Vernon Carlin has been elected president for next year. Gladys 
Hooker has been acting president since the graduation of Virginia Barnes 
in January. 










First Row — Hooker, pres. ; Henton, Cook, Banes, Prof. Johnson, Lutz, Reiter, Sprague. 
Second Ro<w — Minor, Manges, Quick, Arnold, Hines, Dirks. 
Third Row — Winstead, Boling, Lewis, Shields, Carlin, Taylor. 

Page One Hundred and Sixty-seven 
















GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 



L 



NDER the capable direction of. Mr. Franklin Taylor, of the Metro- 
politan School of Music, the Girls' Glee Club has gained greater prom- 
inence — not only at Butler, but throughout the city and neighboring 
towns — than has been attained heretofore. The club, consisting of over 
eighty voices, appeared three times each day at the Circle Theater during 
Collegiate week from November 12th to the 18th. These performances, 
besides interesting the public in Butler affairs, enabled the Glee Club this 
year to donate a considerable amount to the Woman's League building 
fund. Any girl is eligible to try out for club membership. One hour of 
credit has been given for work in the organization since 1926. 

The Girls' Glee Club has been consistent throughout its entire exist- 
ence in rendering the highest grade of music in the field of choral work. 
During the past year, it has appeared before the Veterans of Foreign 
Wars at their banquet at the Claypool in December. On April 27th the 
girls also sang at the concert given by the Veterans of Foreign Wars at 
Caleb Mills Hall. The club opened the Butler Radio Bureau programs 
last fall, being the first to broadcast from Butler over WFBM. 







Emily Mauzy, pres.; Mary Elizabeth Miller, vice-pres. ; Helen DeVelling, Sec; Florence Renn, 
treas. ; LaVonne Chalfant, librarian; Beulah Phillips, Virginia Bailey, soloists; Ruth Otte, 

accompanist. - 

Page One Hundred and Sixty-eight 



«U<-$.-#.~ff*4$~i£~®«*ty>«»$«l>* 







MENS GLEE CLUB 



Mi 



LEN'S GLEE CLUB in its concerts in various parts of the state and 
in Indianapolis during the past year, ha-s attained a high degree of success, 
and has served to interest other communities in Butler. Devoting itself 
to the perfection of a program suitable for concert work, the club meets 
twice a week for rehearsal, under the supervision of H. E. Winslow. 
Members of the club receive one hour of credit for each semester's work. 
The first concert of the season was given at the Irvington School of 
Music under the auspices of Sigma Delta Chi. During its spring tour, 
which opened with a concert in Frankfort, performances were given in 
several towns in the north central section of the state. In some of its out- 
of-town concerts, a new policy was inaugurated by the club this year. Fol- 
lowing the program, the organization which sponsored the concert gave 
a dance, for which the music was furnished by the newly formed Glee Club 
orchestra, composed of Scott Waldon, Vergil Hebert, Joe Gremelspacher, 
Paul Frey, Marvin Finch, Henry Hebert and Mr. Winslow. 




First Row — Charles Barbe, Kent Beecher, Joe Gremelspacher, H. E. Winslow, director; Don 

Higgins, Gareth Hitchock, Hugh Thatcher. 
Second Row — Seward Baker, Charles Barry, Waldo Clark, John Hack, James Hesser, Reginald 

Wood. 
Third Ro<w — Paul Frey, accompanist; Lloyd Sanders, Robert Murray, Arthur Huddleston, 

Herbert White, Dale Weaver. 
Last Row — Lynn O'Neill, Henry Hebert, Wallace Sims, Tom Cory, Virgil Hebert, Robert Andrey. 

Page One Hundred and Sixty-nine 









ImMMT-* 






*&~&~&"l<"&~&~&<~&~& <«ft«f 







PHILOKURIAN 

ESTABLISHED in 1870, Philokurian is the oldest literary society on 
the campus. Founded at Northwestern Christian University to promote 
the interests of ministerial students, it was later affiliated with the Demia, 
Butler and Athenian literary coed societies and now includes both men and 
women in its membership. Students are elected to Philokurian on the 
basis of literary merits, and it has been imperative that they live in 
Irvington. 

In the early days of the society its functions held sway over all other 
extra curricular activities. Today its members retain the traditional ideals 
of the first Philokurian. This year under the direction of Rodney Per- 
kins, president, the members have read several papers and have held 
discussions on contemporary writers. Last year they devoted their time 
to writers of the past. Meetings are held every week in the Administra- 
tion building. A member reads a prepared paper, or the meeting is 
given over to debates or literary discussion. 

Philo, however, does not devote its entire time to literary subjects. 
The meetings have a social air about them that is climaxed once a year at 
the annual Philo steak fry. 




First Row — R. Perkins, pres. ; V. Perkins, Lawler, Kelley, Wright, Miller, Pitts 
Second Row — Hutchinson, Arnold, Scheleen, Overson, Underwood, Ridge. 
Third Row — Nelson, Larmore, McCloud. 
Page One Hundred and Seventy 




SANDWICH CLUB 

^ANDWICH CLUB at Butler University, a school replete with Chris- 
tian traditions, has had a special significance in striving to preserve and 
strengthen a spirit of high ideals and Christian living. 

Organized in 1904 for the purpose of preparing its members for 
Christian activity and strengthening the bonds between Butler men and 
ministerial students, Sandwich Club was then exclusively a men's group. 
In April, 1925, it was affiliated with the Oxford Clubs of America, a 
national organization with practically the same ideals and was then known 
as the Oxford Club. In 1927 the club was merged with the Inner Circle, 
an organization for both men and women, and the group assumed its 
original name. 

Bi-weekly luncheons are held and a social gathering is sponsored each 
fall for the purpose of promoting a broader acquaintance and fellowship 
among the students. 

The officers are: Ernest Harrold, president; Jason Cowan, vice- 
president; Katherine Treadway, secretary; Clifford Lanman, treasurer. 






9 










First Row — Harrold, pres.; Richey, Treadway, Knowlton, Hamilton, Demaree, Thorne. 

Second Row — Reed, Grafton, Bell, Swift, O'Dell, Messersmith. 

Third Row — Cowan, Herod, Wilson, Logan, (Mr9.) Rowe, Thorne, Mendenhall. 

Fourth Row — Lee, Carlisle, Secrist, Rowe, DeGroot, Lanman, Whippo, Dunn, Patrick, Tudor. 

Page One Hundred and Seventy-one 










STUDENT TEACHERS' ASSOCIATION 



ft 



lUTLER University Student Teachers' Association was organized in 
1923, drawing its membership from students majoring in the department 
of education and wishing to make teaching their profession. Due to its 
previous success the association has grown in numbers and interest. It has 
created a definite means of contact between students and leaders in the 
field of education and has contributed materially in extending the name of 
Butler among state school circles, besides the fellowship and interest it 
has fostered among its members. 

Spirited discussions on subjects relating to pedagogy led by prominent 
educators at the regular meetings furnish programmes of interest. Since 
every member of the club has had some practical experience in teaching 
in the city schools, each one individually is qualified to present a more 
accurate experience and gain a greater understanding of the problem than 
is possible in any other extracurricular group. An invaluable quality of 
service has been rendered to the student teacher in the open forum discus- 
sions on imperative problems of the teaching profession. 

Under Lee O. Garber, faculty sponsor, the club expects to furnish 
assistance in placing Butler graduates in teaching positions throughout the 
State. 




Butler Student Teachers' Association. 
Page One Hundred and Seventy-two 













ZOOLOGY CLUB 

^.OOLOGY Club has been organized this year to foster the interest of 
the students, especially freshmen, of the department in the practical and 
theoretical research of zoological science. It is an outgrowth of the old 
Biology Club. In limiting its membership to the students of the Zoology 
department, the club has been able to make its activities more concen- 
trated and worthwhile. The faculty members of the department sponsor 
the organization and assist greatly in stimulating the interest of their 
students. Professor Henry Lane Bruner, head of the Zoology depart- 
ment, deserves much credit for the success of the club. 

One of the most important functions of the club is the annual award- 
ing of a scholarship to the Marine Laboratories at Woods Hole, Massa- 
chusetts. The student who receives this award must have proved himself 
worthy of the honor by successful pursuits and unusual ability in the 
science of zoology. This helps to create and promote an incentive on the 
part of each member to strive for greater excellency in zoology. Robert 
Pitts won the scholarship this year. 




First Row — Small, pres.; Shirk, Bingham, Furstenberg, Kurzrock, MacLean, Robertson, Hollings- 

worth, Haugh. 
Second Row — Armstrong, Ryans, Shearer, Foltzenlogel, Simpson, Reynolds, Quick, Campbell. 
Third Row — Zwick, Fillingham, Meyers, Pascoe, Grainger, Schaeffer. 
Top Row — Boaz, Weber, Wagoner, Summers, White, Sperry. 

Page One Hundred and Seventy-three 






















RADIO BUREAU 



I 



NFORMING the radio public of the happenings and advancements of 
the university became such a necessity in 1927 that the Butler Radio 
Bureau was established to provide a medium for broadcasting, regularly 
each week, a Butler radio hour. Varied programmes ranging from musi- 
cal numbers to talks by faculty members serve to fulfil the purpose of the 
Bureau in disseminating a broader knowledge of local campus activity. 

The Butler radio hour is broadcast every Friday evening over 
WFBM, Indianapolis Power and Light radio broadcasting station. The 
entire programmes are arranged and presented at the regular hour from 
nine until ten by Butler students' except at occasional intervals when prom- 
inent men speak in the interest of Butler. It is planned to devote a part 
of the programme later to a lecture course, which will be continued from 
week to week in the manner of a regular college class. The Butler Band, 
the men and women's Glee Clubs, the men's quartet, fraternity musical 
talent and a number of individuals have "gone on the air" as a result of 
the Bureau's efforts. 

Cards and letters have been received from various parts of this and 
adjoining states complimenting the programmes presented by the Bureau. 







Higgins, chairman; Walker, music chairman; Phillips, co-chairman; Cain, faculty rep. 
Page One Hundred and Seventy-four 










Y. W. C. A. 

^OUNG WOMEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION, exists for the 
purpose of helping the women of the university to face life with courage 
and open-mindedness. During the past year, the leaders of the organiza- 
tion have sought to foster the best interests of the school, to meet the 
spiritual needs of the student, to encourage thinking and to create true 
fellowship among the women. 

Believing wisely directed activity to be a vital part of any college 
organization, the members of the Y. W. C. A. have attempted to serve in 
some manner the entire campus. Each year they have edited the Student 
Directory and conducted a second-hand book store. Twelve Butler girls 
have been sent to the Geneva and Detroit conferences from the proceeds 
of the semi-annual Geneva Stunt Day programmes. The Y. W. C. A. also 
sends a representative of the Student Industrial group to the University 
of Wisconsin summer school. 

Social entertainments are held for the purpose of acquainting all types 
and groups of Butler girls with each other and creating a spirit of good 
fellowship. At the weekly meetings of the organization, questions, inter- 
racial, international, industrial and social are brought before the members 
in open forum discussion. 










Pierson, pres. ; Bonke, vice-pres.; Vennard, sec; Kennedy, treas. 

Page One Hundred and Seventy-five 






p.* -IMMM •*-«-#- 









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PEN AND PENCIL 

^_yONSISTING of those students in the university who are interested 
in the development of literary talent, the Pen and Pencil club has been a 
potent factor in stimulating the creative effort of the student body. Under 
the leadership of Dean Evelyn Butler, the club has developed from a 
short story class into a recognized campus organization with stringent 
membership requirements. The submission of an original manuscript, ac- 
cepted by the club as displaying sufficient ingenuity and effort, is the chief 
requisite to membership in the organization. 

At the meetings, which are held the first and third Mondays in the 
month, the programmes consist of talks on literature by speakers prominent 
in the literary world and the consideration of the submitted manuscripts. 
Plans are being made and material prepared for the petitioning of Quill, 
national college literary organization. It is hoped that a chapter will be 
established on the Fairview campus in the near future. 

In collaboration with other literary organizations on the campus, 
Pen and Pencil aided in the establishment of an official literary magazine, 
the "Cocoon." The club is expected to render further assistance next 
year when the magazine will assume larger proportions, becoming a 
monthly publication. 










Clerkin, pres. ; Sparks, vice-pres. ; Coble, sec; Wheatley, trea 
Page One Hundred and Seventy-six 










I 



INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS 



INTERNATIONAL Relations Club since its origin in September, 1928, 
has had a large and interested following among students desiring a better 
understanding of international political, social and economic affairs. Al- 
though organized primarily for those enrolled in the department of His- 
tory and Political Science the club is open to others who are interested in 
its work. A. D. Beeler, assistant professor of history, who spent several 
years in the consular service in France and Italy, is sponsor of the 
organization. 

Meetings of the Club are held at noon, twice monthly. In addition, 
during the course of the year evening meetings, open to everyone, are 
held in the chapel. Well known authorities, both in and out of the uni- 
versity, lecture before the members on topics of current interest in the 
field of foreign relations. Members are thus able even in the short 
twenty-five minute meetings to obtain an accurate and clear perspective 
of the various countries and peoples of the world, especially those with 
which the United States come in contact. A corresponding secretary keeps 
the club informed of the happenings of college and individual organiza- 
tions of similar character. 







Orbison, pres.; Deem, sec; Scherb, treas. ; Asst. Prof. Beeler, sponsor. 

Page One Hundred and Seventy-seven 






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WOMAN'S LEAGUE 



€ 



RGANIZED for all women in school, Woman's League is the most 
important of all women's groups. Because of the varied interests of its 
members, Woman's League strives to create a unified spirit among 
women, to promote a higher moral standard, and to instill in students an 
enthusiasm for all worthy activities. Mary Lee Orloff has been president 
this year and serving with her are: Ona Boyd, vice-president; Helen 
Schmitz, secretary, and Olga Bonke, treasurer. 

At its first mass meeting of the year the League awards the fresh- 
man scholarship cup to the sophomore girl who maintained the highest 
average during her first year. The winner of the cup this year is Mary 
Louise Mahan. 

Shortly before Christmas the League sponsored the Melting Pot 
Bazaar and the Bazaar dance. Each group on the campus has a booth 
and the proceeds are turned over to the Woman's building at Fairview 
fund. A women's Cotillion was given in the fall by the League, which 
also sponsored an all-school dance during the spring semester. 

Woman's League was one of the seven organizations to contribute 
to the fund which sent two representatives from Butler to attend the First 
Annual Pan-Hellenic Conference for Urban Universities in April at Pitts- 
burg, Pennsylvania. 



£ 










Orloff, pres. ; Boyd, vice-pres.; Schmitz, sec; Bonke, treas. 



Page One Hundred and Seventy-eight 



* 



•-•*••-•» 






MMMMfr 




LEAGUE OF WOMEN VOTERS 

ULECTION year to such an organization as the League of Women 
Voters naturally stimulates interest among women at Butler, which has 
resulted in two semesters of varied work and accomplishments. 

The League of Women Voters works in cooperation with city and 
state leagues with the purpose in view of centering the attention of women 
on politics and straightening out their political problems. Before school 
opened in the fall, the officers met with representatives from these leagues 
and college units and gained many helpful suggestions for the ensuing 
year's work. 

A silver tea was given at the Alpha Chi Omega house at the opening 
of school. Trips were made to the Girl's School at Clermont and to the 
Juvenile Court. At the State Convention held at the Marott Hotel in 
the spring, Edith Ratts and Virginia Flowers, the official Butler delegate, 
attended. Mrs. Booth Tarkington Jameson addressed the League on the 
subject of "Democratic and Republican Conventions." 

Edith Ratts was president of the League this year, and serving with 
her were: Virginia Hampton, vice-president; Ethel Mallock, secretary; 
and Ellen MacLean, treasurer. 







Ratts, pres. ; Hampton, vice-pres. ; Malloch, sec; McLean, treas. 

Page One Hundred and Seventy-nine 



0»ff»f M l 



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Y. M. C. A. 

^OUNG MEN'S CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION is known inter- 
nationally for its splendid service to young men. It is among the oldest 
organizations on the campus and was established for the purpose of stimu- 
lating a true democratic spirit among the men. 

The organization of Y. M. C. A. is divided into three groups which 
hold weekly meetings for the discussion of religious books, ideals and life 
problems. Aside from the regular meetings, Y. M. C. A. sponsors a num- 
ber of freshmen mixers during the school year to acquaint first-year men 
with each other and with college life. From the proceeds of Geneva Stunt 
Day, given once a year, delegates are sent to the annual summer confer- 
ences at Lake Geneva in Wisconsin. This year Y. M. C. A. with the aid 
of Y. W. C. A., sponsored a three-day conference on Campus Problems 
with Mr. Bruce Curry, widely known as a leader in national Y. M. C. A. 
work. 

All the work of the group is carried on in cooperation with the city 
branch of the organization. Y. M. C. A. has great prospects for the 
future since it fills a definite need on the campus in supplying good fellow- 
ship and religious inspiration to the men students. 










K. Parsons, pres. ; B. Beecher, vice-pres. ; Waldon, sec; Harris, treas. 
Page One Hundred and Eighty 












e 




STUDENT BUDGET 



P 



ROVIDING a systematic method of meeting the various demands for 
financial support made on the student body and faculty, the Student Budget 
has been able to eliminate constant canvassing on the campus. Enter- 
prises having no source of income, which previously depended solely on 
campus drives for support, receive the necessary appropriations from the 
Student Budget. The Y. M. C. A. and the Y. W. C. A. are granted fixed 
amounts annually, and Scarf Club and Chimes receive yearly allotments. 
New organizations on the campus are supported by the Budget until they 
become independent. The Collegian and Handbook were formerly pub- 
lished under the supervision of the Budget Committee, and lately it has 
been instrumental in establishing the Men's Union and the Radio Bureau. 
Church organizations and missionaries which formerly applied to the 
University for subscriptions receive contributions from the budget. 

The budget is subscribed by an annual drive beginning on registration 
day and continuing until the quota has been reached. No further requests 
for funds are made during the year, all petitions being referred to the 
Student Budget Committee for action. 

The committee, consisting of six members, is elected by a represen- 
tative student committee made up of the presidents of all recognized 
campus organizations. Prof. Friesner is sponsor and adviser. 




Gearheart, chairman; Green, vice-chairman; Mauzy, sec; Bosworth, treas. 

Page One Hundred and Eighty-one 









It 






f\ 




MEN'S UNION 



Aii 



LEN'S UNION, the largest non-coed campus activity organization, a 
few weeks after the 1927 school year had gotten under way gave the first 
mixer for incoming freshmen. This was followed by two all school foot- 
ball dances, the "Fairview Follies" (a musical review) and — in collabor- 
ation with the Women's League — the June Carnival, which replaced the 
customary May Day of previous years. This completed the Union's most 
successful year. 

Since its re-organization in 1925 the Union has been interested in 
promoting all worthy campus activities, but it was not until this year 
under Henry Hebert, president, that it assumed the role of active leader- 
ship. The sponsoring of the "Follies" gives the Union the rank of first 
place among campus organizations. This revue, which has been the dream 
of students for the past decade, was presented at the Murat Theater 
April 21 under the direction of Hebert and Joe Gremelspacher. 

The ruling body of the Union is the Governing Board, composed of 
an executive committee, one representative from each fraternity, five non- 
fraternity men and Professor R. C. Friesner, faculty representative. It 
is the plan of the Board to erect a Men's Union building at Fairview to 
serve as a headquarters for the men on the campus, thus promoting among 
them a better spirit of fellowship. 




Hebert, pres. ; Gistler, sec; Campbell, treas.; Gremelspacher, Follies director. 
Page One Hundred and Eighty-two 






^^ft w ft w A^#^ w A^ft w ft w ft w A w ^A^^ft^ w A^#^ft ,w #' , *# ,, 'ft* > 'ft >N # ,, 'ft' w <l ,,> # , ^tt ,> # 






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DRIFT 



D 



'RIFT, Junior class yearbook for the third consecutive year has been 
awarded two first places among the annuals of universities of 2000 enroll- 
ment and under. The awards received have been The Art Crafts Guild 
Cup and the Central Interscholastic Press Association Award, two highly 
esteemed prizes. Since its first publication in 1895, when it contained ap- 
proximately eighty pages, the Drift has been gradually enlarging until it 
has reached its present proportions. The growth of the yearbook has kept 
pace with the growth of the University in preserving a continuous record 
(which is portrayed pictorially) of its activities. 

As the Collegian gives its staff a working knowledge of the con- 
struction of a newspaper, so the Drift gives its staff an insight into the 
publication of books. 

The present book is the final edition to be published in the old 
buildings at Irvington and is devoted almost entirely to the new school 
at Fairview. 




First Ro<w — Shepperd, editor; Beem, bus. mgr. ; J. Davis, assoc. ed. ; Hunter, administration; 

Bartley, Benning, Heft. 
Second Row — Seward, classes; Helms, Howenstine, sports; Brownlee, women's sports; Clerkin, 

honoraries; DeVelling, Summers, R. Davis, clubs; Furstenberg, Phillips, stenography; 

Scherb, Stegemeier, sales; Mauzy, Ragan, McCloud, advertising. 

Page One Hundred and Eighty-four 






*«!M^.&*.*~*~tf~*K.« ^^^fl|«.|| fc .^„t"«-ff'-»-«-t*-«-»-#*-«-«'«'' 






2:* 




DRIFT ART STAFF 

COMBINING artistic ability with versatility of thought, the art staff 
of the 1928 Drift has demonstrated by its work on this book the very 
spirit of modernism which it has attempted to depict by a futuristic art 
theme. In an effort to bring the extremities of futurism "down to 
earth" — so to speak — so as to render it more intelligible and appreciated, 
the staff has artistically portrayed a form of art which avowedly is the 
reverse. 

Each member of the art staff is both a student at Butler University 
and the John Herron Art Institute. Two hours of credit in commercial 
art were given for the work done on the Drift. A class conducted by 
M. V. Warner, commercial artist and instructor at the art school, met 
once a week for this purpose. 

The cover design, end sheet and opening pages of this book were 
the creations of Jane Messick, art editor. The Campustry section, which 
is an original feature with the 1928 Drift in page make-up, was planned 
and arranged by Mary Louise Haugh, Jane Willis and Jane Messick. 




Top Row- — Jane Messick, art editor; Jane Willis, Mary Louise Haugh, LaVonne Burns, 

Dorothy Helmer. 
Bottom Roiv — Margaret Kent, Marabeth Thomas, Marcia Clapp, Earl Beyer, Ellen MacLean, 

posters. 

Page One Hundred and Eighty-five 






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• 



I* 



IS* 



&~*~&~*~*~*~*~*~i~*~&~*~&~*~&~*~*~&"*~*~*~*~&~*~*~*-+ 







COLLEGIAN 

IjEGINNING its forty-second year of publication, the Collegian greeted 
the campus last fall with an entirely new appearance. Over the summer 
vacation it had grown from a five-column to a six-column sheet and 
reached the largest proportions it had ever known. This change was 
brought about by the efforts of Professor DeForest O'Dell and J. Doug- 
las Perry, instructor. Joseph Scheleen was editor-in-chief the first 
semester and Joe Cripe was business manager. During the second semester 
Robert Harrison became faculty sponsor of the paper and Joseph Helms 
was appointed editor-in-chief. The staff of the Collegian has been greatly 
increased and is composed of students in the journalism department and 
those interested in newspaper work. 

At the time of the state high school basketball tournament which was 
held in the Butler Field House, the staff put out a twenty-four page edi- 
tion of the Collegian. Copies were distributed to students attending from 
all over Indiana in order to acquaint them with Butler. The large amount 
of advertising in the sheet bespoke the great amount of work Cripe and 
his staff had put on the number. 




Top Row — Scheleen, first sem. Mgr. Ed.; Helms, sec. sem. Mgr. Ed.; Cripe, Bus. Mgr. ; Gueutal, 
Asst. Bus. Mgr.; Waldon, Day City Ed.; Walker, Night City Ed.; Baker, Assoc. Ed. 

Second Row — Caulkins, Assoc. Ed.; Hunter, Assoc. Ed.; Kelley, Assoc. Ed.; Roach, Assoc. Ed.; 
H. Ross, Assoc. Ed.; Raffensberger, Cir. Mgr.; Harrison, Faculty Advisor. 

Page One Hundred and Eigltty-six 



*<k 


















«l 




COLLEGIAN 

| HE fall semester will find the Collegian taking on a new and larger 
aspect. According to plans announced in May by Professor DeForrest 
O'Dell, the staff next year will have the added responsibility of publishing 
each Monday, transforming the Collegian technically into a college daily. 
This development climaxes the gradual evolution of the paper from a 
semi-monthly, weekly, bi-weekly, three, four and now five days a week. 
It is planned, also, to increase the size of the sheet from six to seven 
columns. Several new ideas which have been discussed as possible future 
additions include an all-college rotogravure section. This section, of eight 
pages, would be furnished by a syndicate containing photographic news of 
various colleges throughout the country. Another possible acquirement 
will be wire service rights. Through such a service journalism students 
would come in contact with an important phase of newspaper work in 
handling professional news items. This would be further accomplished 
by converting the paper into a Fairview community organ, carrying news 
of interest to north side residents. Merchants and citizens of that com- 
munity have signified their approval of such a plan. 










First Row — Morris, Alexander, Carroll, Doriot, Taylor, Corya, Hall, Perkins, Erganbright. 

Second Row — Benning, Hall, Lett, Salmon, Siegmund, Robinson, Kemp, Hadd. 

Top Row — Waldon, Walker, Rhoades, Ross, Raffensperger, Hunter, Stegemeier, Brownlee. 

Page One Hundred and Eighty-seven 






I* 

I* 




COCOON 



Di 



_ )ESIROUS of giving Butler a magazine that would serve as an expres- 
ion of Butler's literary talents, Sigma Delta Chi, national journalistic 
fraternity, published the first issue of the Cocoon in June 1927. Austin 
Johnson, president of Sigma Delta Chi, was editor-in-chief and Louise 
Eleanor Ross and Don Sparks were chosen as his associates. The first 
number bore the forewords — "The Cocoon — the embodiment of Butler's 
literary life, beginning in a humble form and aspiring to develop into 
something fine and beautiful with the passing of years." 

The editors have worked out a plan of alternating in editing the 
magazine — both compiled the first issue; Sparks the second, Miss Ross 
the third, and both again, the fourth. Four issues appear during the year. 
The Cocoon desires to encourage creative writing at Butler and is 
constantly on the watch for verse, short stories, essays and plays that reveal 
distinctive ability. The poems of Lucille Turner and Don Sparks (which 
won first prize in the Butler Literary Contest for 1927) were printed 
in the June 1927 issue. It is planned to sponsor a literary contest before 
the publication of each issue as soon as enough interest is displayed in 
the Cocoon. It is hoped by such a plan to "discover" Butler's hidden 
literary talents. 




I* 






Top Roiu — Ross, assoc. ed.; Sparks, assoc. ed. ; Jean Davis. 
Bottom Row — Dawson, Wheatley, Benning, Elrod. 



Page One Hundred and Eighty-eight 









%~*~*~*~*~*~*-&~*~*~i~*~*~*~&"*~&~*~*~&"*~*~&~*~*~&~*~&-^ 



2 







STUDENT DIRECTORY 

^TUDENT Directory is published under the auspices of the Y. W. 
C. A. This publication is a general information bureau for Butler students 
and faculty members. Its purpose is to give adequate information con- 
cerning the different aspects of our university life with the hope that it 
may be helpful especially to new students in acquainting them with the 
institution. 

This year the book contained the following features: a greeting by 
Dr. Aley, a college calendar, and a resume of the entrance requirements. 
Also, special sections were devoted to Fairview, the future Butler, and to 
athletics. The major portion of the book was taken up by faculty and 
student directory giving the name, home and college addresses and 
telephone number of each. Following the directory are the fraternity 
and sorority sections in which are found the house address, telephone 
number, main points in the history of each and the name of the president. 
An interesting historical sketch is also included of all the Honoraries, 
Organizations, Clubs, Publications, Dramatics and Debating. 

This year's Directory was bound in blue leatherette pocket-size bind- 
ing with a large white "B" stamped on the back. Lucile Summers was 
editor, and Fenley Shepperd, business manager. 



i 



I* 







First Row — Summers, pres. ; Shepperd, bus. mgr. ; Gremelspacher, adv. mgr. ; Scherb, Campbell. 
Second Row — Clark, Hancock, Heft, Kelley, Lichtenberg, Malloch. 

Page One Hundred and Eighty-nine 



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NATIONAL COLLEGIATE PLAYERS 

ELECTION to Pi Epsilon Delta, the Butler chapter of National Col- 
legiate Players, an honorary dramatic fraternity is the highest honor given 
on the campus to students who have been outstanding in dramatics. This 
group was installed at Butler in 1925 and in the last three years has 
exerted a great influence over the school's dramatic activities. 

Only juniors and seniors who have participated in a sufficient number 
of dramatic activities to total the coveted twenty points are admitted to 
membership. The fraternity badge is a golden key wearing the masks of 
comedy and tragedy. This year eight wear the golden key. The officers 
are Irma Roller, president; Helen Eastland, vice-president; Neil Firestine, 
secretary; and James Parker Wheatley, treasurer. Mrs. Eugene Fife is 
sponsor of the local group. 

The old Butler dramatic club out of which Pi Epsilon Delta grew, 
presented several productions, but today the organization comes as a 
reward for work done and does not assume definite responsibilities in 
regard to play production. 




Top Row — Roller, pres. ; Eastland, Firestine, Wheatley. 
Bottom Row — Hutchinson, Kelley, Ogborn, Mrs. Eugene Fife. 



Page One Hundred and Ninety-two 



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RIDO 



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EADING, interpretation, dramatics and oratory constitute the four- 
fold idea on which Rido was founded. In the promotion of a greater 
interest in these phases of work the club has been very active. Since its 
organization the members, who are all enrolled in the public speaking 
department, have given plays, pantomines and other productions of 
interest in the dramatic line. Meetings are held bi-monthly in chapel on 
Thursday night. 

The membership, which is made up of about thirty students, forms 
with Thespis a junior organization to furnish material for the National 
Collegiate Players. Because of the valuable training received affiliation 
with one or the other of the clubs is almost imperative before the student 
can become a member of the higher organization. 

Every year the club sponsors theatre parties to the first night per- 
formances of the Berkell Players and the Stuart Walker productions. 

Rido in collaboration with the National Collegiate Players supports 
the inter-collegiate debates and assists in the production of the plays 
sponsored by Thespis. A valuable laboratory for students interested in 
the presentation and interpretation of readings is offered by the club. 



Second Ro<w — Hallihan, Bartley, Agnew, Gowdy. 

First Roiv — Love, pres. ; Walden, Evans, Minor, Hunter. 



Page One Hundred and Ninety-three] 







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THESPIS 

^INCE its organization a year ago Thespis has been the most active 
Dramatic organization on the campus. Three plays, "The Climbers," 
"Everyman" and "The New Poor" have been presented before the stu- 
dents and another, "Dust of the Road," was awarded first place in the 
National Play contest held at Northwestern University, April 19, 20 and 
21. The plays all received enthusiastic support from the student body 
and the actors displayed exceptional ability in the handling of their parts. 

Thespis, which takes its name from the first Greek actor, was 
founded for the purpose of organizing the students interested in dramatic 
work and as a club to cooperate with the National Collegiate Players. 
Besides an ability to act, members are required to take work in the Public 
Speaking department. The membership is limited to forty members. 

The meetings of the organization are held bi-weekly at the Indiana 
College of Music and Fine Arts. Short plays are presented at the meet- 
ings and lessons in make-up and theatrical lore are discussed. 



Hi 




First Row— Firestine, pres.; Walden, Vennard, Schmitz, McKay, Pickerel], Bailey, Ewing, 

Hallihan. 
Second Row — Bartley, Kocher, Leet, Benefiel, Agnew, Ogborn, Gowdy, Dolby. 
Third Rotv — Durbin, Durbin, Coble, Clark, Eberhart, Warren. 
Fourth Roiv — Hunter, Stegemeier, Clark, Wheatley, Kilpatrick. 






Page One Hundred and Ninety-four 









"THE 
CLIMBERS 



-Clyde Fitch 




'EVERY- 
MAN" 



Awarded First 

Place 
National Play 

Contest 

Northwestern 

University 

April 19-21, 

1928 




"THE 
NEW POOR" 

— Cosmo 
Hamilton 



Page One Hundred and Ninety-five 



1 



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DELTA PHI 



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MEMBERSHIP in Delta Phi, national women's debating fraternity, 
is the highest honor a woman interested in public speaking may receive at 
Butler. Since its local founding in 1921, the Alpha chapter has done much 
to create and maintain a greater interest in oratory and debating work. 

Requirements to election in the organization include membership on 
the varsity debating team and participation in at least two intercollegiate 
debates. The pledges, who are announced after the close of the debating 
season, wear the fraternity colors of gold and white. A white rose is the 
flower of the organization. 

Under the presidency of Katherine Treadway a much greater interest 
in the work of the Public Speaking department is being fostered. No 
regular meetings are held by the group, but the members are called 
together by the president as the occasion demands. 

Although work in the field of speech-making is still in the process of 
development at Butler, the efforts for advancement being made by Delta 
Phi have aided materially in the success attained thus far. 




Top Row — Treadway, Bowers, Moschenross, Schmitz. 
Bottom Row — Ball, Buskin, Cohen, Meyer, Vennard. 



Page One Hundred and Ninety-six 



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TAU KAPPA ALPHA 

I AU KAPPA ALPHA, national debating fraternity, since its founding 
on the Butler campus in 1908, has had as its purpose, the increasing of 
interest among students in public speaking, especially by inter-collegiate 
men's debating and oratory. Although organized nationally as a coed 
fraternity, only men have been permitted membership on the local campus, 
Delta Phi having been organized for women. 

To only those men who have demonstrated their worth in the field of 
public speaking is the honor of membership awarded. Election is based 
on the requirement of participation in at least three varsity inter-collegiate 
debates. The organization gave the students an insight into their work 
this year by giving a partial initiation of their pledges in public. The 
neophytes were compelled to mount soap boxes and harangue passers-by in 
front of the Administration building. 

With John Love as president the fraternity has completed a very 
successful year. So much interest has been shown in debating this year 
that public congratulations have been extended to the members by Presi- 
dent Aley. 







Top Row — DeGroot, pres. ; Bredell, Finney, Harrison, Hutchinson. 
Bottom Row — Love, Medias, Parsons, Tudor, Prof. Sifritt. 



Page One Hundred and Ninety-seven 






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WOMEN'S DEBATE TEAM 

/ALTHOUGH achieving only a fifty per cent average of victories in 
their work this year, the women's varsity debating team has completed, on 
the whole, a successful year. Only one member of the team remained 
from last year's squad, but the members were not hampered by their 
inexperience. 

The subject for the debates was Resolved: that the Russian Soviet 
Government should be recognized by the United States. Research proved 
the subject to be somewhat one sided, but the women deserve much credit 
for their ability in handling the question in their forensics. 

Divided into affirmative and negative squads, each team debated 
with colleges and universities in Indiana and nearby states. The affirma- 
tive team lost each of its three debates which were held against Miami 
University, Purdue University and Wittenberg College. The negatives, 
however, won a straight trio of victories in their talks against Purdue 
University, Depauw University and Albion College. 

The members of the teams were — affirmative: Helen Vennard, Ger- 
trude Ball and Helen Schmitz; and the negative: Mrs. Grace Meyer, 
Leona Cohen, Katherine Buskin and Thelma Thomas. 



Top Row — Schmitz, Vennard, Ball. 

Bottom Row — Cohen, Meyer, Buskin, Thomas, (Alternate). 



• 







Page One Hundred and Ninety-eight 






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MEN'S DEBATE TEAM 



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RESENTING an impregnable defense and an irresistible and offen- 
sive reasoning ability, the Varsity Debating team went through its entire 
season without a single defeat. Debating the two subjects, Resolved: that 
the United States should cease to protect American foreign private invest- 
ments; and, Resolved: that the direct primary system for the nomination 
of state and federal officers should be repealed by the several states — the 
teams were victorious in ten contests against debaters from some of the 
best schools in the country. 

Both the negative and affirmative teams were handicapped in that 
none of their personnel were members of the team last year. Several of 
the men have been engaged in oratory and debating work here and else- 
where, but this was their initial attempt at working together. 

The affirmative team debated Miami University, University of the 
City of Cincinnati, University of the City of Detroit, Wabash and Buck- 
nell Colleges. The negative team spoke against DePauw University, 
University of the City of Detroit, Earlham, and the College of Oakland 
City. 



Top Roiv — Love, Medias, Gisler, Bredell. 

Second Row — Harrison, Day, Andry, Robinson, Prof. Sifritt. 

Page One Hundred and Ninety-nine 



1st 













EEAUTy 



Annabelle 
'Parr 




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Ruth 

Murhlitz 







BEAUTY JUDGES 

Clement Truxess, artist 
Roy Andrews, photographer 
Robert Stafford, engraver 
Walter Isnogle, commercial artist 




JORDAN MEMORIAL TOWER 



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COLLEGE days are happy days. Filled with 
the occasional textbook, the traditional "prof," 
the modern coed — CAMPUSTRY — our col- 
lege days never fade in the glow of youthful 
escapades. Overflowing with the modern ver- 
satility which is so much the spice of 
campus life, we live on and live 
over in future days those 
we leave behind in 
memory's 
album. 









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INTER-FRATERNITY COUNCIL 



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NTER-FRATERNITY Council has for its purposes the promotion 
of scholarship among men's fraternities and the administration of extra- 
curricular and social activities for the groups represented. It regulates 
rushing and aims to serve Butler through fraternity organization. Mem- 
bership is composed of one junior and one senior representative from each 
of the national fraternities on the campus and from local groups having 
at least twenty-five members. This is an important organization in the 
fraternity life of the college and does a great deal to aid in preserving 
cordial relations among fraternities at Butler and to dispose of the com- 
mon interests and business of the campus groups in a satisfactory manner. 

This year, the council sponsored an inter-fraternity dance which was 
held January 22nd at the Columbia Club. It has also sponsored and regu- 
lated all of the intra-mural sport contests. Wendell Brown and George 
Cecil composed the basketball committee. Phi Delta Theta won the 
inter-fraternity basketball championship this year and was presented with 
a silver loving cup by the Council. Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity was the 
winner of the track relay, also sponsored by the Council, and was pre- 
sented with a statue of a runner as a trophy of championship. Frank 
Schmedel and John Daily composed the committee in charge of track. The 
Council also sponsored the baseball league. It is planned to award a lov- 
ing cup to the fraternity having the highest scholastic average next year. 



Top Row — Lewis, pres.; McEIroy, Phi Delta Theta; Chandler, Dailey, Sigma Chi; Carvin, 
Schmedel, Delta Tau Delta; Hufford, Baxter, Lambda Chi Alpha. 

Bottom Row — Shipley, Williams, Tau Kappa Tau; Brown, Bott, Sigma Nu; Buskirk, Chi Rho 
Zeta ; Beecher, Pflum, Kappa Delta Rho. 

Page Two Hundred and Thirty-three 




9 



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PHI DELTA THETA 




Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, December 26th, 1! 
Ninety-three Chapters 
Indiana Gamma Chapter established, October 22nd, 1859 















George Collyer, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
George Cottrell, '28, Indianapolis 
Turpin Davis, '28, Indianapolis 
Joe Dienhart, '28, Lafayette 
Donald King, '28, Indianapolis 



Second Row — 

Harrison Smitson, '28, Tipton 
Archie Lewis, '29, Warren, Ohio 
Robert Pitts, '29, Indianapolis 
Frank Symnes, '29, Indianapolis 
Fred Arzett, '30, IndianaDolis 
Martin Barnett, '30, Indianapolis 



Third Row — 

Nish Dienhart, '30, Lafayette 
Robert Hanscom, '30, Indianapolis 
Merle McCloud, '30, Crawfordsville 
Joe Perrine, '30, Indianapolis 
Edward Raffensberger, '30, Indianapolis 
Ralph Walton, '30, Danville, 111. 



Fourth Row — 

Robert Boesinger, '31, Indianapolis 
Robert Butterworth, '31, Indianapolis 
Granville Geisert, '31, Marshall, 111. 
Clark Hayes, '31, Indianapolis 
Hubert Hinchman, '31, Greenfield 
George Horst, '31, Indianapolis 



Fifth Row- 
James Larmore, '31, Anderson 
William McCarthy, '31, Crawfordsville 
Ralph McElroy, '31, Indianapolis 
Frank Newkirk, '31, Tipton 
Roger Overson, '31, Kokomo 
Ray Shettle, '31, Anderson 



Sixth Row— 

James Strahl, '31, Greenfield 
Russell Townsend, '31, Indianapolis 
Urban Wilde, '31, Indianapolis 
George Winkleman, '31, Brownsburg 
Crawford Yeazel, '31, Indianapolis 









Page Two Hundred and Thirty-four 






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SIGMA CHI 




Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, March, 1855 

Eighty-seven Chapters 

Rho Chapter established, April 10th, 1865 



First Row — 

Joseph Helms, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
John Bolte, '28, Indianapolis 
Horace Brown, '28, Indianapolis 
Almon Coble, '28, Indianapolis 
Norman Cook, '28, Indianapolis 
Harold Hollincsworth, '28, Indianapolis 



Second Roiv — 

Harold Holtz, '28, Frankfort 
Robert Hutchinson, '28, Peoria, 111. 
Harold Meek, '28, Greensburg 
Karl Stegemeier, '28, Indianapolis 
William Walker, '28, Indianapolis 
Richard Beem. '29, Indianapolis 



Third Roiv — 

Dana Chandler, '29, Indianapolis 
John Daily, '29, Indianapolis 
Edwin Gable, '29, Indianapolis 
Gordon Haggard, '29, Indianapolis 
Robert Orbison, '29, Indianapolis 
Jean Unger, '29, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Wayne Ashley, '30, Lebanon 
Jay Beem, '30, Indianapolis 
Robert Boyer, '30, Indianapolis 
Gordon Arbuckle, '30, Rushville 
Robert Daily, '30, Indianapolis 
Ralph Gery, '30, Colfax 



Fifth Row — 

Harold Ross, '30, Frankfort 
Robert Stearns, '30, Coral Gables, Fla. 
Gordon Thompson, '30, Indianapolis 
Robert Tracy, '30, Indianapolis 
Evans Walker, '30, Lebanon 
William Caldwell, '30, Rushville 



Sixth Row — 

Frederick Baumgartner, '31, Indianapolis 

Robert Brown, '31, Indianapolis 

Charles Long, '31, Indianapolis 

James Myers, '31, Rushville 

Wendell Shullenberger, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Thirty-six 






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DELTA TAU DELTA 






Founded at Bethany College, West Virginia, 1859 

Seventy-one Chapters 
Beta Zeta Chapter established, February 11th, 1878 



First Roin — 

Joseph Strickland, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
James Carter, '28, Indianapolis 
James Carvin, '28, Indianapolis 
Archie Chadd, '28, Bainbridge 
Harrison Collier, '28, Wilkinson 
Donald Gearheart, '28, Logansport 
Joseph Gremelspacher, '28, Logansport 



Second Row — 

Gareth Hitchcock, '28, Indianapolis 
Willis Jackman, '28, Indianapolis 
Waide Price, '28, Indianapolis 
Joseph Scheleen, '28, La Porte 
William Bucg, '29, Bainbridge 
Joseph Cripe, '29, Lafayette 



Fourth Row — 

Allen Shimer, '29, Indianapolis 
Fenley Shepperd, '29, Indianapolis 
Scott Waldon. '29, Boswell 
Arlo Kilpatrick, '30, Ovid, Mich. 
Seward Baker, '31, Logansport 
Frank Fairchild, '31, Indianapolis 
Henry Gibson, '31, Indianapolis 



Fifth Row- 
James Hesser, '31, Indianapolis 
Richard Huggins, '31, Indianapolis 
Donald Youel, '31, Indianapolis 
John Barney, '31, Indianapolis 
Thomas Corey, '31, Lebanon 
William Makey, '31, Ironwood, Mich. 
Ruell Moore, '31, Indianapolis 



Third Row — 

Robert Hanna, '29, Fort Wayne 
Henry Hebert, '29, Indianapolis 
Frederick Kilgore, '29, Indianapolis 
Robert Nulf, '29, Fort Wayne 
Judson Paul, '29, Selkirk, N. Y. 
Donald Sando, '29, Madison 



George Nulf, '31, Fort Wayne 
Harry Pogue, '31, Frankfort 
Robert Schopf, '31, Fort Wayne 
Harrison Sibbitt, '31, Fillmore 
Joe Sivak, '31, Chicago, 111. 
Robert Steger, '31, Fort Wayne 
Morris Swain, '31, Pendletton 






Page Two Hundred and Thirty-eiglit 



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LAMBDA CHI ALPHA 




Founded at Boston University, Boston, Mass., November 2nd, 1909 

Seventy-two Chapters 

Alpha Alpha Chapter established, December 17th, 1915 



First Row — 

Neil Firestine, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Clair Dean, '28, Advance 
Robert Finney, '28, Indianapolis 
Frank Furstenberg, '28, Indianapolis 
Marvin Hufford, '28, Frankfort 



Second Row — 

Everett Mildner, '28, Indianapolis 
William Weaver, '28, Mooresville, Miss. 
Charles Ingersoll, '29, Indianapolis 
Francis Levings, '29, Indianapolis 



Third Row — 

Robert Montgomery, '29, Indianapolis 
Carlyle Bauermeister, '30, Indianapolis 
Raymond Baxter, '30, Indianapolis 
Marshall Christopher, '30, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Herbert Murnan, '31, Greenfield 
James Nicely, '31, Greenfield 
Ernest Rea, '31, Indianapolis 
Melvin Roach, '31, Indianapolis 
Claude Hatfield, '31, Greenfield 



Page Two Hundred and Forty 






* 



* 















*-«*#. 






TAU KAPPA TAU 



Founded at Butler, January 8th, 1919 
Petitioning Beta Theta Pi 



First Roiv — 

Harold Shipley, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
William Houghland, '28, Milroy 
Russel Ammeter, '29, Indianapolis 
James Dunn, '29, Indianapolis 
Walter Geisler, '29, Indianapolis 



Cecil Boling, '30, Medora 
Waldo Clark, '30, Indianapolis 
William Franklin, '30, Indianapolis 
Kenneth Grimes, '30, Indianapolis 
Wayne Halford, '30, Sorento, 111. 






Second Roiv — 

Clifford Gueutal, '29, Indianapolis 
Richard McDowell, '29, Indianapolis 
George Paulissen, '29, Indianapolis 
Oral Stanton, '29, Indianapolis 
Robert Barber, '30, Indianapolis 



Fourth Roiv — 

Robert Hutto, '30, Kokomo 
Ralph Metcalf, '30, Indianapolis 
Frank White '30, Indianapolis 
Charles Williams, '30, Indianapolis 
James Woolford, '30, Indianapolis 









Fifth Roiv— 

William Hantzis, '31, Indianapolis 
Edward Jolly, '31, Indianapolis 
Robert McCoy, '31, Indianapolis 
LaMar Perico, '31, Indianapolis 
Paul Thompson, '31, Indianapolis 
Edward Wilson, '31, Indianapolis 






Page Two Hundred and Forty-two 







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41 












SIGMA NU 




Founded at Virginia Military Institute, Lexington, Va., January 1st, 1869 
Ninety-five Chapters 
Epsilon Mu Chapter established, May 6th, 1926 



First Row — 

Adrian Nail, '28 (Pres.), St. Paul 
Wendell Brown, '28, Indianapolis 
Iris McIlwain, '28, Rushville 
Morris Sylvey, '28, Mt. Comfort 
Robert Thompson, '28, Indianapolis 
Cyril Tudor, '28, Monrovia 
Horace Tudor, '28, Monrovia 



Second Row — 

Parker Wheatley, '28, Indianapolis 
Hardin Calithan, '29, Indianapolis 
Thomas Caulkins, '29, Indianapolis 
Hamilton Clarke, '29, Indianapolis 
Arthur Cope, '29, Indianapolis 
Donald Higcins, '29, Indianapolis 



Third Row — 

Frederick Mitchell, '29, Indianapolis 
Elzie C. Partlow, '29, Indianapolis 
Don Sparks, '29, Summitville 
Robert Williams, '29, Indianapolis 
Byron Benson, '30, Indianapolis 
George Bott, '30, Indianapolis 



Seventh Roiv — 



Fourth Row — 

Richard Campbell, '30, Indianapolis 
Howard Ely, '30, New Augusta 
Robert Feuerbach, '30, Indianapolis 
Preston Hargitt, '30, Indianapolis 
Raymond Holland, '30, Columbus 
Stewart Holmes, '30, Portland 



Fifth Row — 

Clifford Michael, '30, Pendleton 
George Miller, '30, Indianapolis 
Gerald Sharrer, '30, Benton Harbor, Mich. 
Hugh Thatcher, '30, Indianapolis 
Ruben Beabout, '31, Michigantown 
Courtland Carrington, '31, Indianapolis 
Harry Clark, '31, Indianapolis 



Sixth Row — 

Malcom Davidson, '31, Indianapolis 
Virgil Hebert, '31, Indianapolis 
Roland Hole, '31, Mt. Comfort 
Robert Hood, '31, Indianapolis 
Harold Johnson, '31, Kingman 
Clifford May, '31, Newcastle 
Howard May, '31, Newcastle 



Earl McCormick, '31, Indianapolis 
Kenneth Mount, '31, Noblesville 
Edwin Ogborn, '31, Indianapolis 
Lawrence Sawin, '31, Indianapolis 
John Shugart, '31, Indianapolis 
Robert Waldon, '31, Indianapolis 
Reginald Wood, '31, Newcastle 



Page Two Hundred and Forty-four 









First Row — 

Kenneth Baker, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Paul Frey, '28, Anderson 
Eldon Nelson, '28, Indianapolis 
Thomas Arnold, '29, Peru 
Georce Buskirk, '29, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Lawrence Davis, '31, Westfield 
Wayne Farrow, '31, Indianapolis 
Lester Godby, '31, Westfield 
Milton Hutchens, '31, Hortonsville 
Dudley Jackson, '31, Evansville 
Theodore Johnson, '31, Kingman 






CHI RHO ZETA 










Founded at Butler University, February 5th, 1925 
Petitioning Alpha Tau Omega 



* 






Second Row — 

Charles Garrison, '29, Indianapolis 
Harry Smith, '29, Indianapolis 
Raymond Snider, '29, Indianapolis 
Wilbur Teeters, '29, Indianapolis 
Eugene Underwood, '29, Indianapolis 
Russel Buchanan, '30, Indianapolis 



Third Row— 

Arthur Echternacht, '30, Indianapolis 

Jack Garrison, '30, Indianapolis 

Harrell Johnson, '30, Kingman 

Leo Lee, '30, Fairmount 

Fred Martin, '30, Indianapolis 

Edwin Allen, '31, Westfield 



Fifth Row — 

Robert Murnan, '31, Indianapolis 
Edward Patrick, '31, Indianapolis 
Cleon Reynolds, '31, Terre Haute 
Stanley Reddick, '31, Indianapolis 
William Redding, '31, Indianapolis 
Thurman Ridge, '31, Indianapolis 



Sixth Row — 

Wallace Sims, '31, Indianapolis 
Robert Smith, '31, Indianapolis 
Norman Thompson, '31, Indianapolis 
John Woddell, '31, Noblesville 
Richard Wolfe, '31, Indianapolis 









Page Two Hundred and Forty-six 









vTSl^H 



















'ft-fr- * ~&"&~(Mk*&^~&~&~ft "&~&~&~&~&~ &~&"&^h 



DELTA ALPHA PI 




Founded at Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, Ohio, Nov. 22nd, 1919 

Six Chapters 
Epsilon Chapter established, May 31st, 1927 



First Row — 

Carlos Boaz, '28 (Pres.), Morgantown 
Warren Bosworth, '28, Indianapolis 
Ernest Harrold, '28, Fairmount 
Ferris Reynolds, '28, Atlanta 



Second Row— 

Harold Bredell, '29, Indianapolis 
Harold Miller, '29, Topeka, Kas. 
Richard Moore, '29, Vincennes 
Mark Ashley, '30, Noblesville 



John Brewer, '30, Indianapolis 
Cyrus Herod, '30, Franklin 
Charles Whippo, '30, Anderson 
Glen Tudor, '30, Martinsville 



Fourth Row — 

Paul Ashley, '31, Noblesville 
Hershei. Reed, '31, Eaton 
George Shelby, '31, Greenfield 
Charles Wilcox, '31, Syracuse 



Tage Two Hundred and Forty-eight 






i~ft~a~&~a~ * 






KAPPA DELTA RHO 






Founded at Middlebury College, Middlebury, Vermont, 1905 

Eighteen Chapters 

Omicron Chapter established January 7th, 1928 



First Row — 

George Henderson, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Brazier Beecher, '28, Kokomo 
Kent Beecher, '28, Kokomo 
Wayne McMahan, '29, Summitville 
Urban Pflum, '29, Indianapolis 
Raymond Snider, '29, Greenfield 

Second Row — 

Theodore Sperry, '29, Indianapolis 
Robert Andry, '30, Huntington 
Eugene Campbell, '30, Indianapolis 
John Hughes, '30, Rushville 
Charles Barbe, '31, Indianapolis 

Third Row- 
Howard Caulfield, '31, Indianapolis 
Robert Egly, '31, Grabill 
Clarence Frazier, '31, Indianapolis 
Byron Goetz, '31, Indianapolis 
Robert Howard, '31, Indianapolis 

Fourth Row — 

Russell Inman, '31, Indianapolis 
Berwyn Jones, '31, Indianapolis 
Jack Kincsolver, '31, Colorado Springs, Colo. 
Clausen McKim, '31, Fort Wayne 
Howard Newhouse, '31, Indianapolis 

Fifth Row — - 

Thomas Pierson, '31, Newcastle 
Lloyd Polen, '31, Indianapolis 
Edward Ridlen, '31, Indianapolis 
Oran Stanley, '31, Indianapolis 
Harold Vehling, '31, Indianapolis 
Dale Weaver, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Fifty 












%~ft~&~&~a~&' 




















MLHfMJEH 



wcmen 









PAN-HELLENIC 



P 



AN-HELLENIC Association, organized in 1914, has for its purpose 
the cooperation of women's fraternities for the good of the college and 
all its women students, to benefit the fraternities of the college and to 
unify the interests of the fraternity and non-fraternity women. Member- 
ship is composed of one Junior and one Senior representative, chosen in 
April to serve one college year, from each of the national fraternities rep- 
resented in the institution and from such local organizations as Pan- 
Hellenic members may see fit to admit. 

The Association is a very important factor in the life of the college 
and does a great deal to unify school spirit, to regulate rush conditions, 
to uphold faculty regulations for scholastic and social activity, and to 
create a spirit of fellowship. Some of the important accomplishments of 
the organizations this year have been the Pan-Hellenic Formal Dance 
held March 10 at the Columbia Club, which was attended by about two 
hundred couples, and a bridge party held January 7th at the Propylaeum. 
The Association demonstrated its worth to the campus by a liberal gift of 
$200.00 to Butler Women's League toward the building fund for the new 
Women's Building at Fairview. 

Meetings are held at the various chapter houses the first Monday of 
each month. The officers rotate among the representatives of the various 
fraternities in the order of the dates of establishment of the respective 
chapters at Butler. 







Top Row — Hooker, pres. ; Hastings, sec. and treas. ; Orloff, Layman, Boyd, Hancock, Reagan, 

Dunkle 
Second Row — Baker, Miller, Tomlinson, Hale, Duesenberg, Benham, Roller, Hampton 
Third Row — McCormick, Falvey, Thomas, Emrich, Madden, Kelley, MacLean, Malloch 






Page Two Hundred and Fifty-five 















KAPPA ALPHA THETA 







Founded at DePauw University, Greencastle, Indiana, January 27th, 1870 

Fifty-six Chapters 

Gamma Chapter established, February 27th, 1874 



Helen DeGrief, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 

Ocie Hicgins, '28, Lebanon 

Mary Ann Huggins, '28, Indianapolis 

Jane Ogborn, '28, Frankton 

Mary Lee Orloff, '28, Indianapolis 

Frances Peters, '28, Indianapolis 

Mary Alice Wishard, '28, Indianapolis 

Dorothy Wright, '28, Indianapolis 

Second Row — 

Alice Ball, '29, Indianapolis 
Lenore Brandt, '29, Indianapolis 
Jean Davis, '29, Indianapolis 
Rosemary Dyer, '29, Indianapolis 
Margaret Ice, '29, Indianapolis 
Rebecca Jones, '29, Indianapolis 
Isabel Layman, '29, Indianapolis 

Third Row — - 

Marian Marshall, '29, Indianapolis 
Mildred Masters, '29, Brookville 
Jane Messick, '29, Indianapolis 
Evelyn Seward, '29, Columbus 
Marie Wacnon, '29, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Welborn, '29, Evansville 
Bertha Corya, '30, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Gertrude Delbrook, '30, Indianapolis 
Mable Erganbright, '30, North Salem 
Eleanor Hadd, '30, Indianapolis 
Mary Louise Larmore, '30, Anderson 
Mary Jane Morris, '30, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Preston, '30, Indianapolis 
Annabelle Parr, '30, Lebanon 



Fifth Row— 

Virginia Rhoades, '30, Indianapolis 
Ruth Robinson, '30, Frankfort 
Helen Siegmund, '30, Wabash 
Rosalie Schell, '30, Indianapolis 
Jane Willis, '30, Indianapolis 
Louise Adney, '30, Lebanon 
Martha Bachelor, '31, Indianapolis 

Sixth Row — ■ 

Virginia Carter, '31, Rushville 
Josephine Chancelor, '31, Kokomo 
Priscilla Demler, '31, Indianapolis 
Hilda Griffith, '31, Indianapolis 
Harriet Harding, '31, Tipton 
Margaret Harrison, '31, Indianapolis 
Harriet Henderson, '31, Indianapolis 



Seventh Row- 
Elizabeth Hodges, '31, Indianapolis 
Mary Hoover, '31, Indianapolis 
Valencia Meng, '31, Indianapolis 
Mary Mills, '31, Indianapolis 
Eleanor Moran, '31, Indianapolis 
Margaret New, '31, Greenfield 
Jane Riddell, '31, Chicago, 111. 
Flora Walters, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Fifty-six 






KAPPA KAPPA GAMMA 




Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, October 13th, 1870 

Fifty-six Chapters 

Mu Chapter established, January 2nd, 1878 



First Roiu — 

Martha Dean, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Ona Boyd, '28, Indianapolis 
Josephine Clay, '28, North Salem 
Helen Eastland, '28, Indianapolis 
Margaret Elrod, '28, Indianapolis 
Margaret Hackleman, '28, Indianapolis 
Martha Belle Pierce, '28, Indianapolis 



Second Row — 

Louis Pruett, '28, Indianapolis 
Mary Wagoner, '28, Indianapolis 
Helen Williams, '28, Long Beach, Calif. 
Margaret Woessner, '28, Indianapolis 
Jean Campbell, '29, Indianapolis 
Elsie Hancock, '29, Indianapolis 



Isabelle Kerr, '29, Indianapolis 
Laura Smith, '29, Indianapolis 
Virginia Ballweg, '30, Indianapolis 
Frances Eames, '30, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Kammerer, '30, Indianapolis 
Margaret Kent, '30, Indianapolis 



Seventh Row — 



Fourth Row — 

Mary Elizabeth Miller, '30, Indianapolis 
Josephine O'Neill, '30, Logansport 
Mildred Payton, '30, Birmingham, Mich. 
Dorothy Ragan, '30, Indianapolis 
Norma Shuttleworth, '30, Indianapolis 
Marabeth Thomas, '30, Indianapolis 



Fifth Row — ■ 

Mary Voris, '30, Lebanon 
Catherine Willis, '30, Crawfordsville 
Louise Wiseheart, '30, North Salem 
Mary Louise Beem, '31, Indianapolis 
Margaret Barker, '31, Thorntown 
Betty Jean Davis, 31, Indianapolis 



Virginia Davis, '31, Lebanon 
Eleanor Durbin, '31, Indianapolis 
Jean Duthie, '31, Indianapolis 
Margaret Ham, '31, Knightstown 
Anna Lee Howell, '31, Hitchcock, S. D. 
Katherine Kinnaird, '31, Indianapolis 
Harriet Lewis, '31, Detroit, Mich. 



Elizabeth Margileth, '31, Indianapolis 
Nance Marsh, '31, Indianapolis 
Lillian Pierson, '31, Indianapolis 
Adalaide Reeves, '31, Greenfield 
Katherine Rinehart, '31, Indianapolis 
Margaret Schumacher, 31, Indianapolis 
Jane Wells, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Tico Hundred and Fifty-eight 










0-t»*~fMMMMMMt-' (MMr"*^*"*"*"*"*"*"*"*"* 









PI BETA PHI 




Founded at Monmouth College, Monmouth, Illinois, April 27th, 1867 

Seventy-four Chapters 

Indiana Gamma Chapter established August 27th, 1897 



Katherine Reagan, '28, (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Dorothy Deem, '28, Greensburg 
Ruth Pectol, '28, Spencer 
Jeannette Sheehe, '28, Bloomfield 
Elizabeth Woodfill, '28, Greensburg 
Janice Barnard, '29, Indianapolis 
Janet Carr, '29, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Marjorie Goble, '30, Indianapolis 
Frances Kirkpatrick, '30, Rushville 
Marjorie McElroy, '30, Indianapolis 
Ruth Mushlitz, '30, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Springer, '30, Indianapolis 
Truth Wakeman, '30, Mooresville 
Beatrice Yates, '30, Indianapolis 



Mary Clerkin, '29, Greensburg 
Wilma Dunkle, '29, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Moschenross, '29, Indianapolis 
Ruth Omelvena, '29, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Pier, '29, Indianapolis 
Emma Louise Reeves, '29, Mooresville 



Third Row — ■ 

Monzelle Skelton, '29, Indianapolis 
Esther Tilford, '29, Martinsville 
Dortha Weaver, '29, Indianapolis 
Barbara Bridges, '30, Indianapolis 
Marjorie Brown, '30, Indianapolis 
Virginia Flowers, '30, Peoria, 111. 



Fifth Row — 

Alberta Alexander, '31, Indianapolis 
Marian Barnard, '31, Indianapolis 
Emily Barnes, '31, Logansport 
Dorothy Behmer, '31, Indianapolis 
Beatrice Burgan, '31, Indianapolis 
Hilda Carroll, '31, Indianapolis 
Helen Fisher, 31, Frankfort 



Virginia Hill, 31, Indianapolis 
Frances Kelley, '31, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Krieg, '31, Indianapolis 
Hazel Lambkin, '31, Indianapolis 
Madge McPherson, '31 .Indianapolis 
Catherine Murdoch:, '31, Indianapolis 
Evelyn Pier, '31, Indianapolis 



Seventh Row — 

Marthai.ou Schoener, '31, Indianapolis 
Dorthy Screes, '31, Indianapolis 
Lois Sherrill, '31, Indianapolis 
Virginia Wakeman, '31, Mooresville 
Charlotte Walter, '31, Indianapolis 
Virginia Whitlock, '31, Indianapolis 
Marcaret Woodfill, '31, Greensburg 



Page Two Hundred and Sixty 









&~&~&~R~&~&~&~&~»~&~&~A~&~&~*~fi~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~ll~H~&~&~4 






DELTA DELTA DELTA 




Founded at Boston University, Boston, Massachusetts, 
November 24th, 1888 

Seventy-one Chapters 

Delta Lambda Chapter established, May 18th, 1914 



Mildred Kelley, '28 (Pres.), Frankfort 
Martha Baker, '28, Indianapolis 
Mildred Booth, '28, Milroy 
Dorothea Canfield, '28, Indianapolis 
Miriam Fay, '28, Indianapolis 
Clara Foxworthy, '28, Indianapolis 
Eleanor Gibson, '28, Indianapolis 

Second Row — 

Bertha Green, '28, Indianapolis 
Marianna Kennedy, '28, Indianapolis 
Gladys Hooker, '28, Indianapolis 
La Vonne Burns, '29, Indianapolis 
Orpha Ewing, '29, Indianapolis 
Lucile Wildinc, '29, Indianapolis 



Third Row — 

Grace Avels, '30, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Beightol, '30, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Bowman, '30, Indianapolis 
Maja Brownlee, '30, Indianapolis 
Mary Ewing, '30, Indianapolis 
Opal Fleming, '30, Noblesville 



Seventh Roiv — 



Fourth Row — 

Georgia Holder, '30, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Johnson, '30, Indianapolis 
Marian Katterhenry, '30, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Lindsay, '30, Indianapolis 
Martha Nauer, '30, Vernon 
Mary Louise Pierce, '30, Indianapolis 



Fifth Rota — 

Maxine Scales, '30, Dayton, Ohio 
Martha Barry, '31, Indianapolis 
Frances Boston, '31, Indianapolis 
Marjorie Brownlee, '31, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Cochran, '31, Indianapolis 
Pauline Coffin, '31, Indianapolis 
Irene Cravens, '31, Bloomfield 

Sixth Row — 

Elizabeth Dalman, '31, Indianapolis 
Helen Eisor, '31, Indianapolis 
Martha Hill, '31, Tipton 
Catherine Matthews, '31, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Morris, '31, Shelbyville 
Elsie Null, '31, Indianapolis 
Ruth Otte, '31, Indianapolis 



Imogene Pierson, '31, Kennard 
Ruth Raffensperger, '31, Indianapolis 
Janice Ryan, '31, Indianapolis 
Mildred Sullivan, '31, Indianapolis 
Geneva Stalcup, '31, Bloomfield 
Margaret Tremain, '31, Adams 
Katherine Zimmerschied, '31, Frankfort 



Page Two Hundred and Sixty-tivo 






i 

*■• 

* 
I* 









<tf~tf~tt~«~fMMK.tf~$M$«fl~$~ -flMf»% 



I"ft"&~#~a"&"a"ft"&"ft"a~ft~a"fl~a~&~ft~&~a~a~ft~&~ fl ~ft~a ~,g 










ZETA TAU ALPHA 







Founded at Virginia State Normal, Farmville, Va., October 25th, 1! 
Fifty-five Chapters 
Alpha Delta Chapter established, June 5th, 1920 



First Roil — 

Olca Bonke, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Anna Baldauf, '28, Lebanon 
Lois Hunt, '28, Indianapolis 

Elizabeth Ann Miller, '2S, Indianapolis 
Wilma Swartz, '28, Indianapolis 
Margaret Alexander, '29, Connersville 

Second Roil— 

Elizabeth Fullenwider, '29, Indianapolis 
Edna Garwood, '29, Big Springs, Ohio 
Mary Hastings, '29, Indianapolis 
Helen Rilling, '29, Indianapolis 
Lucile Summers, '29, Indianapolis 

Third Row— 

Jean Vestal, '29, Indianapolis 
Lucile Zimmerman, '29, Bridgeport 
Carrie Zook, '29, Mooresville 
Loretta Galm, '30, Indianapolis 
Marjorie Holl, '30, Indianapolis 
Mary Esther Lawler, '30, Indianapolis 

Fourth Ro<w — 

Virginia Lett, '30, Indianapolis 
Clara Schreiber, '30, Indianapolis 
Delma Vestal, '30, Indianapolis 
Josephine Carter, '31, Indianapolis 
Mae Dilts, '31, Basin, Wyo. 
Thelma Gahan, '31, Indianapolis 

Fifth Roiv— 

Vera Hallihan, '31, Remington 
Thelma Ivans, '31, Indianapolis 
Violette Lanning, '31, Indianapolis 
Bernice Livingston, '31, Indianapolis 
Winifred McDowell, '31, Indianapolis 
Thelma Williams, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Sixty-four 



'$)' , &**&"&'"&»'& , "&'~&"&~ , &'»&~&~ , fr'fr'6 t ~ i &'~&+'l %~&~&~&~&»'&~&'~fr'&"&*4 









ALPHA DELTA THETA 




Founded at Transylvania, Lexington, Kentucky, January 1st, 1919 

Fourteen Chapters 

Epsilon Chapter established, October 13th, 1923 



First Row — 

Virginia Barnes, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Lova Conn, '28, Knightstown 
Mildred Goens, '28, Indianapolis 
Helen Schmitz, '28, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Shaffer, '28, Indianapolis 
Mildred Smith, '28, Indianapolis 



Second Row — 

Helen Thomlinson, '28, Indianapolis 
Gladys Ervin, '29, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Gallager, '29, Indianapolis 
LaRue Hale, '29, Indianapolis 
Mildred Murphy, '29, Indianapolis 



Third Row — 

Sara Nepher, '29, Chicago, 111. 
Janice Pickerell, '29, Darlington 
Mabel Rider, '29, Dallas, Texas 
Dorothy Rothert, '29, Indianapolis 
Mildred Shaffer, '29, Indianapolis 
Elsie Shelley, '29, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Virginia Sohl, '29, Noblesville 

Ruth Spenser, '29, Kokorao 

Helen Vennard, '29, Indianapolis 

Nan Frances Warren, '29, Tyronza, Ark. 

Juanita Wood, '29, Tyronza, Ark. 

Marjorie Wood, '29, Indianapolis 



Fifth Row— 

Ercil Askren, '30, Greensburg 
Edith Garrison, '30, Indianapolis 
Mary Hargitt, '30, Indianapolis 
Mary Louise Mahan, '30, Indianapolis 
Madge Simms, '30, Elnora 
Elizabeth Dodson, '31, Indianapolis 



Dorothea Durnell, '31, Indianapolis 

Pauline Elvers, '31, Indianapolis 

Ruth Jones, '31, Indianapolis 

Mary Louise Madaris, '31, Los Angeles, Cal. 

Mildred McCormick, '31, Veedersburg 

Wilhelmina Shirtz, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Sixty-six 









DELTA ZETA 




Founded at Miami University, Oxford, Ohio, October 24th, 1902 

Fifty Chapters 

Alpha Nu Chapter established, June 17th, 1924 



First Row — 

Pearl Bartley, '28 (Pres.), Jacksonville, Fla. 

Dorothy Duesenberg, '28, Indianapolis 

Gladys Swan, '28, Plainville 

Lee Zwickel, '28, Indianapolis 

Mary Jayne Benham, '29, Salem 

Mary Katherine Campbell, '29, Indianapolis 

Second Row — 

Helen Kingham, '29, Indianapolis 
Harriet Kistner, '29, Indianapolis 
Maxine Quinn, '29, Indianapolis 
Katherine Rubush, '29, Indianapolis 
Ada Rubush, '29, Indianapolis 
Irene Wood, '29, Greenfield 

Third Row- — 

Mary Carriger, '30, Indianapolis 

Elizabeth Evans, '30, Indianapolis 

Wilma Hunt, '30, Rushville 

Geraldine Shaw, '30, Indianapolis 

Ruth Triller, '30, Indianapolis 

Mary Eleanor Armstrong, '31, Indianapolis 

Fourth Row — 

Geneva Banker, '31, Greenfield 
Mildred Beadle, '31, Indianapolis 
Frances Blomberg, '31, Indianapolis 
Isabelle Early, '31, Indianapolis 
Maxine Foltzenlogel, '31, Indianapolis 
Virginia Hecathorn, '31, Indianapolis 

Fifth Row — 

Alice Higman, '31, Anderson 
Gertrude Hock, '31, Indianapolis 
Marcella Mathews, '31, Indianapolis 
Helen Miller, '31, Indianapolis 
Mary Elizabeth Thumma, '31, Anderson 
Lois Young, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Sixty-eight 






ALPHA CHI OMEGA 



Founded at DePauw, Greencastle, Indiana, October 15th, 1885 

Forty-seven Chapters 

Alpha Chi Chapter established, February 28th, 1925 



Irma Roller, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Marcena Campbell, '28, Indianapolis 
Thel.ma King, '28, Indianapolis 
Beulah Moore, '28, Rossville 
Edith Ratts, '28, Indianapolis 
Lucinda Smith, '28, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Underwood, '28, Indianapolis 



Second Roiv — 

Elizabeth Barclay, '29, Indianapolis 
Ruby Davis, '29, Pendleton 
Virginia Hampton, '29, Indianapolis 
Helen Haynes, '29, Pittsboro 
Jane Hurst, '29, Kankakee, 111. 
Marthalou Akers, '30, Indianapolis 



Katherine Calwell, '30, Indianapolis 
Louise Cox, '30, Peru 
Dorothy Dolby, '30, Springfield, Ohio 
Marion Fleming, '30, Portland 
Jeannette Griffith, '30, Indianapolis 
Jane Hawekotte, '30, Indianapolis 



Seventh Roic- 



Dorothy Lambert, '30, Indianapolis 
Betty Martindale, '30, Indianapolis 
Jessie Peffley, '30, Indianapolis 
Margaret Shanklin, '30, Indianapolis 
Olga Snyder, '30, Indianapolis 
Helen Stephenson, '30, Indianapolis 



Fifth Row— 

Elizabeth Ammerman, '31, Indianapolis 
Helen Baughman, '31, Kokomo 
Edna Biery, '31, Frankfort 
Melba Folke, '31, Indianapolis 
Elsie Gilkison, '31, Indianapolis 
Constance Glover, '31, Veedersburg 



Naomi Guild, '31, Indianapolis 
Clarabel Hacker, '31, Indianapolis 
Ann Louise Hall, '31, Indianapolis 
Jane Hall, '31, Indianapolis 
Beatrice Johnson, '31, Indianapolis 
Maxine Jones, '31, Indianapolis 
Gretchen Kemp, '31, Kempton 



Carol May-born, '31, Toledo, Ohio 
Gladys Manor, Indianapolis 
Florence Renn, '31, Indianapolis 
Emma Lou Richter, '31, Indianapolis 
Harriet Swain, '31, Indianapolis 
Myra Triller, '31, Indianapolis 
Lucile Wood, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Seventy 



t 1 




.fMMM? -<~t M fMMMMM:- '^v^fM^v^V^V^V^ 












4 



i 









ALPHA DELTA PI 



Founded at Wesleyan College, Macon, Georgia, May 13th, 1851 

Fifty-two Chapters 

Alpha Phi Chapter established April 4th, 1925 



Mary L. McCormick, '28 (Pres.), Ind'polis 

Helen Adolay, '28, Indianapolis 

Pauline Arnold, '28, Warsaw 

Edna Cooney, '28, Madison 

Lois Myers, '28, Carmel 

Virginia Small, '28, Indianapolis 



Mary K. Falvey, '29, Indianapolis 
Judith Fillingham, '29, Vincennes 
Iris Hinshaw, '29, Carmel 
Mary Irwin, '29, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Lawson, '29, Indianapolis 
Hazel Rey'nolds, '29, Indianapolis 



Second Row — 

Ruby Stout, '28, Indianapolis 
Katherine Sweet, '28, Indianapolis 
Anna Thiele, '28, Indianapolis 
Mary Armstrong, '29, Indianapolis 
Martha Armstrong, '29, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Thelma Rubush, '29, Indianapolis 
Esther Quick, '29, Carmel 
Helen McCoy, '30, Indianapolis 
Florence McDonald, '30, Indianapolis 
Dixie McKay', '30, Indianapolis 
Lillian King, '30, Indianapolis 



Fifth Row— 

Pauline Plummer, 30, Lawrence 
Marian Whetstine, 30, Lawrence 
Mildred Arnholter, '31, Indianapolis 
Mary Halstead, '31, Indianapolis 
Miriam Hillman, '31, Ben Davis 
Martha Hinshaw, '31, Carmel 



Sixth Row — ■ 

Ruth Lindemann, '31, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Kepner, '31, Indianapolis 
Lucille Kern, '31, Indianapolis 
Marie Kirk, '31, Shelbyville 
Helen Konecke, '31, Indianapolis 
Elma Paul, '31, Indianapolis 



* 



T 






Page Two Hundred and Seventy-tivo 






i^ft- , A»"ft-^ 







DELTA GAMMA 










Founded at Mississippi Women's Institute, January 2nd, 1874 

Forty-four Chapters 

Alpha Tau Chapter established, October 3rd, 1925 



First Row — 

Eleanor Jones, '28 (Pres.), Indianapolis 
Virginia Bailey, '28, Valley City, N. C. 
Esther Barkley, '28, Odon 
Mrs. Edna Christian, '28, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Helmer, '28, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Reed, '28, Indianapolis 
Thelma Thomas, '28, Indianapolis 



Second Row — 

Rachel Crew, '29, Dayton, Ohio 
Aileen Deuschle, '29, Indianapolis 
Helen DeVellinc, '29, Indianapolis 
Mildred Dirks, '29, Indianapolis 
Rosalind Emrick, '29, Indianapolis 
Josephine Fitch, '29, Indianapolis 



Third Row — 

Catherine Gilbert, '29, Indianapolis 
Emily Mauzy, Rushville 
Dorothy Morga, '29, Indianapolis 
Frances Schube, '29, Indianapolis 
Virginia Sibel, '29, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Spanagel, '29, Rushville 
Armen Ashjian, '30, Indianapolis 



Marcaret Cheney, '30, Rossville 
Martha Cobler, '30, Indianapolis 
Winifred Davis, '30, Knightstown 
Marjorie Day, '30, Indianapolis 
Jeannette Epler, '30, Indianapolis 
Kathryn Haugh, '30, Indianapolis 
Mary Louise Haugh, '30, Indianapolis 



Fifth Row- 
Doris Howard, '30, Lincoln 
Helen Irwin, '30, Alexander, Ohio 
Helen Kocher, '30, Decatur 
Evelyn Snyder, '30, Indianapolis 
Elizabeth Wheeler, '30, Waverly, Mo. 
Josephine Adams, '31, Indianapolis 
Marguerite Doriot, '31, Indianapolis 



Elma Ferguson, '31, Indianapolis 
Elsa Fischer, '31, Indianapolis 
Margaret Gabriel, '31, Indianapolis 
Alice Kiser, '31, Knightstown 
Katherine Louden, '31, Indianapolis 
Mildred Milner, '31, Indianapolis 
Zoralice Mount, '31, Greenfield 



Seventh Row — 

Gretchen Overleese, '31, Lebanon 
Janet Pascoe, '31, Kearsarge, Mich. 
Virginia Perkins, '31, Indianapolis 
Alice Shirk, '31, Indianapolis 
Lillian Steinmetz, '31, Indianapolis 
Annalee Webb, '31, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Wilson, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Seventy-four 



■ 







#< tKV- 






^^ w A w A w ft^4ft^4l"ft^ft w ft^ft w ^ w <l w ft^ w ft w ft^ft^# w ft"ft^ , "ft''' , 4ft w 4l' < 'tt , ' ,, <l w ft* 



KAPPA PHI 



Founded at Butler University. October 7th, 1925 
Petitioning Sigma Kappa 



First Row — 

Opal Bratton, '29 (Pres.), New Richmond 
Helen Cunnincham, '28, Martinsville, 111. 
Dorothy Madden, '28, Tangier 
Clarice Ellingwood, '29, Fortville 



Martha Kelley, '29, Indianapolis 
Lucille Seever, '29, Carlisle 
Ellen Ellingwood, '30, Fortville 
Martha Hensley, '30, New Augusta 



Third Row— 

Margaret Walker, '30, Indianapolis 
Margaret Bradeurn, '31, Indianapolis 
Lena May Hild, '31, Indianapolis 
Grace Kibbe, '31, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row— 

Zelda Robey, '31, Indianapolis 
Anne Shelton, '31, Indianapolis 
Dorothy Squires, '31, Indianapolis 
Wilma Thompson, '31, Indianapolis 






Page Two Hundred and Seventy-six 



^&~^ft"ft~ft"ft-&~ft~a~&"a~ft~ft"ft~ft~&~ft",fr 






ALPHA OMICRON PI 




Founded at Barnard College, New York City, N. Y., January 2nd, 1897 

Thirty-seven Chapters 

Beta Theta Chapter established, October 1st, 1927 



Ellen MacLean, '28 (Pres.), Toledo, Ohio 
Geneva Robertson, '28, Kokomo 
Dorothy Swift, '28, Indianapolis 
Mary Elizabeth Johnson, '29, Indianapolis 
Ruth Lindenborg, '29, Indianapolis 



Second Row — 

Ethel Mallock, '29, Indianapolis 
Doris Speaker, '29, Fort Wayne 
Miriam Cosand, '30, Indianapolis 
Marjorie Fleury, '30, Indianapolis 
Margaret Renick, '30, Indianapolis 



Frances Shera, '30, Indianapolis 
Marian Archer, '31, Indianapolis 
Enola Deane, '31, Muncie 
Bertha Furstenberg, '31, Indianapolis 
Gladys Hawickhorst, '31, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Alice Hill, '31, Indianapolis 
Ruth McClurg, '31, Frankfort 
Beaulah Phillips, '31, Rushville 
Miriam Schad, '31, Indianapolis 
Lucille Wright, '31, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Seventy-eight 



9 



* 






^"&~&~&"&~&~&~&"&"&~&~&"&~&~&^~&~&~&~&~&~&~&"&~&~&~&«&'4' 






UNIVERSITY CLUB 




Established at Butler University, November 11, 1926 



First Row — 

Blanche McBride, '28 (Pres.), Frankfort 
Mildred Allen, '31, Indianapolis 
Eleanor Amos, '30, Cumberland 
Theodosia Arnold, '31, Warsaw 
Addie Axline, '30, Indianapolis 
Lois Axline, '30, Indianapolis 

Second Row — 

Mary Bourne, '29, Indianapolis 
Irene Bowers, '28, Indianapolis 
Mary Lou Clark, '31, Indianapolis 
Leona Hall, '30, Indianapolis 
Ruth Emhardt, '28, Indianapolis 

Third Row — 

Ruby Marie Eveleth, '31, Carmel 
Dorothy Fee, '30, Hamilton 
Lena Fortney, '30, Indianapolis 
Martha Griffin, '30, Indianapolis 
Roberta Hayes, '31, Morristown 

Fourt/i Row — 

Esther Huber, '30, Indianapolis 
Nancy Litchenburg, '28, Indianapolis 
Frieda May, '28, Indianapolis 
Hilda Miller, '28, Indianapolis 
Alice Mae Rhodes, '30, Vienna, 111. 

Fifth Row— 

Gracie Robb, '29, Indianapolis 

Mary Roe, '28, Kentland 

Margaret Snyder, '30, Atlanta 

Ruth Tegarden, '31, Orleans 

Alice Lorraine Thomas, '30, Indianapolis 

Margie Walden, '30, Zionsville 



Page Two Hundred and Eighty 










Mr"#~*-*~iMMMMMMMr«'* 













JAMES A. ROHBACH, A. M., LL. D., 

Dean of the Indiana Law School 












* 












LAW FACULTY 



James A. Rohbach, A. M., LL. D. 

Dean and Professor of Lain 

William G. White, LL. B. 

Professor of Law 



Robert N. Fulton, LL. B. 

Professor of Law 

Fremont Alford, LL. B. 

Professor of Criminal Law and Procedure 



L. Roy Zapf, A. B., LL. B., M. Dip. 

Professor of International Law and Lecturer 
on Diplomacy 

Noble C. Butler, LL. D. 

Professor of Constitutional Law and Lecturer 
on Federal Jurisprudence 



Howard W. Adams, A. B., LL. B. 

Instructor in Law 

James M. Ogden, A. B., LL. B. 

Instructor in the Law of Negotiable Instru- 
ments 



John W. Kern, A. B., LL. B. 

Instructor in Law 




' 




•V ■■#.'•■©•■"■ A^WgH 



THIRD YEAR CLASS 
Abbett, Marion T., Indianapolis 

Indiana University; Sigma Delta Kappa 

Brattain, Kenneth G., Noble sville 

Indiana University; Gamma Eta Gamma 



Brown, Douglas 



Indianapolis 
Lyons 



Brown, Garald H., 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Secretary 



Brown, W. Boyd, Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Vice President 

Caporale, Philip W., 

Springfield, Mass. 

Tri-State Normal; Valparaiso University; 
Sigma Delta Kappa 



Copes, Kenneth E., 

Muncie Normal 



Brookville 



Cox, Kenneth H., Indianapolis 

Butler University; Sigma Delta Kappa 



Dawson, James M., Freeport, III. 

Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 

Donadio, James V., Branford, Conn. 

Delta Theta Phi 















J 















THIRD YEAR CLASS, (cont.) 
Egan, Fred A., Green Bay, Wis. 

Tri-State Normal; Delta Theta Phi 

Grimes, Edward, Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa; President 



Holtzclaw, Roy A., Lancaster, Ky. 

Indiana University; Sigma Delta Kappa 

Hornbrook, Byron H., Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa 



Hume, John T. Jr., Indianapolis 

Indiana University 



Jones, J. Elwood, 

Sigma Delta Kappa 



Indianapolis 



Lemons, Kenneth E., Indianapolis 

Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 

McMahan, Robert L., Indianapolis 

Illinois University; Kappa Delta Rho; Delta 
Theta Phi 



Meyer, Howard M., Indianapolis 

Ohio Northern University; Sigma Delta 
Kappa; Valedictorian 

Moore, Edward L., Indianapolis 

A. B., Oscaloosa College; LL. B., Detroit 
College of Law 







)"&<*&*&"&"&'"&'' 




THIRD YEAR CLASS, (cont.) 

Pomush, Lewis F., Moose Lake, Minn. 

University of Minnesota; St. Paul College 
of Law; Sigma Delta Kappa 



Raitano, B. Alfred, 

Delta Theta Phi 



Augusta 



I 



Richardson, Henry J. Jr., 

Mobile, Ala. 

Illinois University 

Sisson, Frank T., Indianapolis 

A. B., Butler University; Sigma Delta Kappa 



Stump, Raymond D., Indianapolis 

Indiana Central College; Sigma Delta 
Kappa 



Vickery, David B., 



Indianapolis 



Wade, Robert J., 

Butler University 



Mooresville 



Wickliff, Waldo C, Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa; Treasurer 



Witmer, Francis E., Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa 

Zwerner, Adolph H., Terre Haute 

Delta Theta Phi 









SECOND YEAR CLASS 
Bates, Gerritt M., Indianapolis 

Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 

Cook, Charles W., Indianapolis 

Delta Theta Phi 



Fitzpatrick, Claude R., 

Williamson, W '. Va. 

Detroit School of Technology; Sigma Delta 
Kappa 

Gates, Charles E., Greenfield 

Sigma Delta Kappa 



Grant, Marshall L., Indianapolis 
Green, Loys W., Shirley 

Indiana University; Sigma Delta Kappa; 
President 



Hammond, Walter L., Gary 

Indiana University; Delta Theta Phi 

Horn, Sidney H., Des Moines, Iowa 

A. B., Drake University; Delta Theta Phi 



Kennedy, Byron C, 

North Manchester 

McKeogh, Richard, 

Mayfield, England 

Columbus College 



McNorton, Paul D., Rockville 

B. S., Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 

Melvin, Joe P., Noblesville 










tt 









*~&~A~&"&~6~*~&~*~&~&~*~*~fr6^~*~&~&~Q~i~&~&~6~l„fr.l* i 




SECOND YEAR CLASS (cont.) 
Musselman, Emmett H., Indianapolis 

Central Normal; Sigma Delta Kappa 

Pfaff, John W., Marietta, Ohio 

A. B., Hanover College; Beta Theta Pi 



Robinson, Arthur R., Jr., 

Indianapolis 

Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 

Ross, George N., Owosso, Mich. 

Delta Theta Phi 



Sargent, James F. T., Indianapolis 

B. S., Purdue; Delta Theta Phi; Secretary 

Shick, Frederick E., Indianapolis 

Butler University; Delta Theta Phi; Treas- 



Shuck, James C, Franklin 

Franklin College; Indiana University; Delta 
Theta Phi 

Staples, Paul S., Indianapolis 

B. S., Butler University; Sigma Delta Kappa 



Steger, Charles F., Indianapolis 

Indiana University; Delta Theta Phi 

Wells, Charles Marion, 

Indianapolis 

A. B., Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 



Wilkinson, David R., New Castle 

B. S., Butler University; Sigma Delta Kappa 

Zeichert, Carl F., Fremont, Wis. 

Milwaukee College of Law ; Sigma Delta 
Kappa 






2 















FIRST YEAR CLASS 






Blum, Samuel, 



Indianapolis 



Daily, Wilson S., Indianapolis 

A. B. Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 



Donnelly, David F., Monticello 

Sigma Delta Kappa 

Dowling, Addison M., Indianapolis 

A. B., De Pauw University; Delta Theta 
Phi ; Treasurer 



Eckstein, Frederick M., Indianapolis 

Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 

Elrod, Milton, Jr., Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa 



Foley, Charles H., Martinsville 

Indiana University; Sigma Delta Kappa 

Gallagher, Edward P., Terre Haute 

Indiana Normal; Delta Theta Phi 



Granofsky, Hyman F., Indianapolis 

Indiana University 

Hackley, Forrest L., 

Miles City, Mont. 

Benton Law School 



Hitchcock, Gareth M., Indianapolis 

Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 

Humphrey, Max E., lndianapol'n 











FIRST YEAR CLASS (cont.) 
Ichenhauser, Louis M., Evansville 

Indiana University 

Johnson, Jesse W., Indianapolis 

Delta Theta Phi 



Keller, Paul B., Indianapolis 

Sigma Delta Kappa 

Lollis, Edward W., Indianapolis 

A. B., Butler University; Delta Theta Phi 



Metcalf, Edwin W., Kingston, Ohio 

Butler University; Sigma Delta Kappa 

Prime, George H., Robinson, III. 

A. B., Hanover College; Delta Theta Phi 



Purdy, Gerald C, Indianapolis 

Butler University 

Rudicel, Paul G., Indianapolis 

Indiana University; Sigma Delta Kappa; 
Secretary 






McCarthy, Ted., 

Sigma Delta Kappa 




Indianapolis 




Manaugh, John J. 

Hanover College 


A., 


Hanover 


















Marshall, Wm. F.. 

Sigma Delta Kappa 




Arlington 




Messick, Paul M., 




Bloomfield 








FIRST YEAR CLASS (cont.) 
Schnaitter, Paul R., Shelbyville 

Indiana University; Sigma Delta Kappa 

Smith, Robert C, Indianapolis 

Delta Theta Phi 



Stein, Isadore, 



Indianapolis 



Stewart, Herbert W., Indianapolis 

Butler University; Sigma Delta Kappa 



Van Gestel, Theodore J., 

Indianapolis 

Butler University; Indiana University 

Wexler, Abe L., 



Indianapolis 



Williams, Merle E., Greenwood 

Franklin College; Delta Theta Phi 

Wilson, Wesley T., Indianapolis 

A. B., Butler University; Sigma Delta 
Kappa 



Wynn, Earl J. 



Indianapolis 

A. B., Butler University; Delta Theta Phi; 
President 




t K ■ i w w—^— — ■ — m imh i 1 1 i n aa»w m w i ii -ti' ■iiim m ii .» i m i ■ ■ w i«n m ie n i i m m > 
















SIGMA DELTA KAPPA 



Founded at University of Michigan, 1914 

Thirty-six Chapters 

Eta Chapter established, 1916 



W. Boyd Brown, '28 (Chan.), Indianapolis 
Marion T. Abbett, '28, Indianapolis 
Garald H. Brown, '28 (Treas.), Lyons 
Kenneth H. Cox, '28, Indianapolis 
Edward Grimes, '28, Indianapolis 



Fourth Row — 

Loys W. Green, '29, Shirley 
Paul S. Staples, '29, Indianapolis 
David R. Wilkinson, '29, New Castle 
Carl F. Zeichert, '29, Fremont, Wis. 
Milton Elrod, Jr., '30, Indianapolis 



Roy - A. Holtzclaw, '28, Lancaster, Ky. 
Byron H. Hornbrook, '28, Indianapolis 
J. Elwood Jones, '28, Indianapolis 
Howard M. Meyer, '28, Indianapolis 
Lewis F. Pomush, '28, Moose Lake, Minn. 



Fifth Roiv— 

Ted McCarthy - , '30, Indianapolis 
Paul G. Rudicel, '30, Indianapolis 
Wesley T. Wilson, '30, Indianapolis 
David F. Donnelly, '30, Monticello 
Charles H. Foley, '30, Martinsville 



Third Roiu — i 

Frank T. Sisson, '28 (Sec), Indianapolis 
Raymond D. Stump, '28 (Vice Chan.), In- 
dianapolis 
Waldo C. Wickliff, '28, Indianapolis 
Francis E. Witmer, '28, Indianapolis 
Claude R. Fitzpatrick, '28, Williamson, 
W. Va. 



Charles E. Gates, '29, Greenfield 
Paul B. Keller, '30, Indianapolis 
William F. Marshall, '30, Arlington 
Emmett H. Musselman, '29, Indianapolis. 
Paul R. Schnaitter, '30, Shelbyville 
Herbert W. Stewart, '30, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Ninety-six 



&~&~*~&~*~*~&"&"&~&~*~i~Qr&^~&*&»&~l~l~&~i~Q~£„i*,fr*fr.4 



DELTA THETA PHI 




Founded at University of Chicago, 1900 

Fifty-six Chapters 

Voorhees Senate Chapter established, 1922 



First Roiu — 

Adolph H. Zwerner, '28 (Dean), Terre 
Haute 

James M. Dawson, '28, Freeport, HI. 

James V. Donadio, '28, Branford, Conn. 

Fred A. Egan, '28 (Vice-Dean), Green Bay, 
Wis. 

Kenneth E. Lemons, '28, Indianapolis 

Robert L. McMahan, '28 (Tribune), Indian- 
apolis 



Third Roiu — 

George N. Ross, '29 (Sec), Owosso, Mich. 
James F. T. Sargent, '29, Indianapolis 
Frederick E. Shick, '29, Indianapolis 
Charles M. Wells, '29, Indianapolis 
Wilson S. Daily, '30, Indianapolis 
Addison M. Dowling, '30, Indianapolis 



Second Roiu— 

B. Alfred Raitano, '28, Augusta 
Charles W. Cook, '29 (Treas.), Indianapolis 
Walter L. Hammond, '29, Gary 
Paul D. McNorton, '29, Rockville 
Arthur R. Robinson, Jr., '29, Indianapolis 



Fourth Roiu — 

Frederick M. Eckstein, '30, Indianapolis 
Edward P. Gallagher, '30, Terre Haute 
Edward W. Lollis, '30, Indianapolis 
Merle E. Williams, '30, Greenwood 
Earl J. Wynn, '30, Indianapolis 
Gerritt M. Bates, '29, Indianapolis 



Fifth Roiu— 

Gareth Hitchcock, '30, Indianapolis 
Sidney A. Horn, '29, Des Moines, Iowa 
Jesse W. Johnson, '30, Indianapolis 
George H. Prime, '30, Robinson, 111. 
James C. Shuck, '29, Franklin 
Robert C. Smith, '30, Indianapolis 



Page Two Hundred and Ninety-eight 






'•"»-* 







WHEN the times are hard and people are not 
buying, is the very time that advertising should 
be the heaviest. You want to get the people in 
to see what you have to sell, and you must ad- 
vertise to do that. When the times are good 
they will come of their own accord. But I be- 
lieve in advertising all the time. 
I never stop advertising. 

—JOHN WANAMAKER 



+~&~&~*"&~*~*~&"6~&~&~*~i~*~&~*~&~&~*~&~&"*"*~*~*~i~i~to*4 



Butler Students 

When You graduate and get out in the cold, cruel world, You'll want 
a reminder of those carefree college days when exams and "dates" were 
all that worried you. That is why J. DOUGLASS PERRY edits the 

Alumnal Quarterly 

and, that is why it is printed by the "OLD SWIMMIN' HOLE PRESS" at 
Greenfield, Indiana. Printers of the 

DRIFT 

STUDENT DIRECTORY 

ALUMNAL QUARTERLY 

ff^m. Mitchell Printing (So. 

Gree?tjield y Indiana 

It is a wise investment that only costs TWO DOLLARS. Subscribe to 
the ALUMNAL QUARTERLY. You will never regret sending your 
subscription to 

GEORGE A. SCHUMACHER, Alumni Treasurer, 
Butler University — Indianapolis 



Page Three Hundred, and Two 









Butler University 



INDIANAPOLIS 



SUMMER SESSION, 1928 

June 18 to August 11 



COURSES 


OF 


INSTRUCTION 


Astronomy 






History 


Athletic Coaching 






Latin 


Biblical History and Literature 


Mathematics 


Botany 






Philosophy 


Chemistry 
Economics 
Education 
English 






Physics 

Political Science 
Psychology 
Romance Language 


German 






Zoology 



COLLEGE CREDIT 

All the work is of standard college grade. Credits may apply on college degrees. 
Students may make a maximum of nine semester hours credit. Teachers and college 
students will find the work particularly well adapted to their needs. 

Courses to meet the new Indiana licensing law. 



CAPITAL CITY ADVANTAGES 

BUTLER UNIVERSITY is centrally located and easily accessible. The city of 
Indianapolis offers many attractions through its churches, libraries, parks, stores and 
theatres. Rooms and boarding places may be had in the vicinity of the College at 
reasonable rates. 

The detailed announcement of the Summer Session, giving full information regard- 
ing courses, fees and academic credit, will be mailed on application. Send for one. 



The Director of the Summer Session, Butler University, Indianapolis, Ind. 



• 



Page Three Hundred and Three 



^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^r,^^^^^^^^^ A ^ 



4 



4 






Metropolitan 



33rd 
Year 



School 



i 



of 



Music 



INDIANAPOLIS, 
INDIANA 



Announcement 

As the Drift is going to 
press announcement is made 
that Mr. Arthur Jordan, the 
generous donor of the Arthur 



Jordan 



Me 



the new Butler Campus, has 
acquired and is combining 
the Metropolitan School of 
Music and the Indiana Col- 
lege of Music and Fine Arts 
with the view of developing 
a great musical center in 
Indianapolis, probably under 
the name of Arthur Jordan 
Conservatory of Music. 

The two schools with their 
faculties will remain as at 
present until the 
atory is available 



Cons 



Degree 

Bachelor of 

Music 

Offered 

Secretary, 
Lois H. Buskirk 

Students' Advisor, 
Isabelle Mossman 

Directors 

EDWARD NELL 
LESLIE E. PECK 
HUGH McGIBENY 



I 



Page Three Hundred and Four 



Affiliated with Butler University 

CENTRAL BUILDING 

Pennsylvania and North Streets 

Phones: Lincoln 3351-3352 

NORTH BUILDING 

The North Building is located at the corner of 
Pennsylvania and Thirty-fourth streets. This building 
is reached by the Central Avenue Meridian Heights and 
the Illinois-Fairground street cars. Phone, Washing- 
ton 1859. 

In this school the same high standards are main- 
tained, the course of study is the same, and its students 
have the same advantage of recitals, concerts and plays 
as are offered at the central school. 

THIS IS THE FACULTY 
It is With Pride We Point to It 

Cornet and Trumpet 

Leslie Eugene Peck 

John "Wesley Lewis 
Flute 

Arthur Deming 
Clarinet and Saxophone 

Adolph H. Schellschmidt 

Lela Peck Zimmerman 
Public School Music 

Ernest G. Hesser 

Elizabeth Kaltz 
Harmony 

Arthur G. Monninger 
General Theory of Music 
Essentials 

Arthur G. Monninger 
History of Music 

Donn Watson 
Sig-ht Singing 

Lorie Krull 
Musical Form and Analysis 

Tull E. Brown 
Music Appreciation 

Grace Hutchings 
Ensemble 

Adolph H. Schellschmidt 
Orchestral Instruments, In- 
strumentation, Counterpoint 
and Composition 

Adulph H. Schellschmidt 
Folk Dancing and Singing 
Games 

Norma Justice 
Reading and Dramatic Art 

Frances Beik 

Helen Sartor 

Norman Green 

Gladys Smead 

Norma Justice 
Play Analysis 

Frances Beik 
Public Speaking 



Piano 

Willard McGregor 

Arthur G. Monninger 

Earle Howe Jones 

Mary E. "Wilhite 

Mrs. Arthur W. Monning 

Tull E. Brown 

May Aufderheide Kolmer 

Grace Hutchings 

Helen Louise Quig 

Allie Frances Eggleton 

Frieda Heider 

Lucile Wagner 

H. Otis Pruitt 



Nor 



Bea 



Leone Kinder 
Frances Anne Wishard 
Grace Flagg 
Jeannette Gardiner 
Florence Keepers 
Kelton Whetstine 
Marie Zorn 

Voice 

Edward Nell 
Benjamin F. Swarthout 
Franklin N. Taylor 
Ida Belle Sweenie 
Lulu Brown 
Frieda Heider 
Mildred Johns 

Violin 

Hugh McGibeny 
Donn Watson 
Henry Marshall 
Edwin Jones 
Thomas Poggiani 
Georgia Bauman 

Viola 



Viol in cello 

Adolph H. Schellschmidt 



Beik 



YEAR BOOK FREE ON APPLICATION 

BALDWIN AND ELLINGTON PIANOS USED 









%"&~&~*~&~*~*~&~*~*~*~*~i~*~&~*~&~*~*~&~*»&~*~&~t~i~i~*-4 



«l 



Indiana Law School 

UNIVERSITY OF INDIANAPOLIS 

(Associated With Butler University) 

Three Years Course of Study 
Leading to the Degree of Bachelor of Laws 



FACULTY 

JAMES A. ROHBACH, Dean NOBLE C. BUTLER 

FREMONT ALFORD ROBERT N. FULTON 

WILLIAM G. WHITE HOWARD W. ADAMS 

JAMES M. OGDEN JOHN W. KERN 

L. ROY ZAPF EDWARD M. WHITE 



For Information, Address the Dean, 

312-322 Columbia Securities Building 

PHONE RILEY 3433 P. O. BOX 146 

143 East Ohio Street 

Indianapolis 

Page Three Hundred and Five 









ART ASSOCIATION OF INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



Art School of the 



John Herron Art Institute 



Pennsylvania and Sixteenth Streets 



INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 




The Art School of the John Herron Art Institute is the property of 
the Art Association of Indianapolis, Indiana, and is situated at Pennsyl- 
vania and Sixteenth Streets, near the Art Museum. It offers courses in 
FINE ARTS, COMMERCIAL ART and TEACHERS' TRAINING. 

The Museum and the Art School are closely associated. The students 
are not only admitted to the galleries, without charge, but they are allowed 
to work directly from the objects exhibited or from material especially 
arranged for their study. 

The Library, including 2,800 volumes on art, and current periodicals, 
situated in the Museum Building, is used by the Art School. 

A catalogue will be mailed upon request. 

Page Tliree Hundred and Six 



* 



* 


















Indiana College of Music 
and Fine Arts 



Affiliated With Butler University 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 



71 

I '""" "' ' """ """""" - - m „.,..., , , , „„ 

1 ANNOUNCEMENT I 



1 tit a !t, t D 5 lft A s gome to press announcement is made that I 

| Mr. Arthur Jordan, the generous donor of the Arthur Jordan Memorial 1 

| group on the new Butler Campus, has acquired the Indiana College of B 

| Music and Fine Arts and the Metropolitan School of Music with the i 

I view of developing a great musical center in Indianapolis, probably I 

1 under the name of Arthur Jordan Conservatory of Music 1 

i *.■?£? tW0 s ^ hools with their faculties will remain as at present 1 

| until the new Conservatory is available. i 



" Ill I iiiiuiiiim i minimum imiimiu 



11 ' ' II i ' m in II minim 



FACULTY 

FREDERICK BARKER FRANCES JOHNSON 

ELEANORA BEAUCHAMP GLADYS LOUCKS 

BLANCHE DUNN BROWN FLORA LYONS 

MYRA GOODNOW CLIPPINGER MARTHA MARTIN 

LENORA COFFIN ARTHUR MASON 

BOMAR CRAMER PASQUALE MONTANI 

EDNA CROAN RUTH RANIER NESSLER 

IVA EIDSON DUCKWALL GRACE CLARKE PIERCE 

EVELYN HENDERSON FIFE LOUISE PURCEL POWELL 

LILLIAN A. FLICKINGER WALTER REULEAUX 

ILA FRIERMOOD CHRISTINE WAGNER ROUSH 

GLENN FRIERMOOD ELEANOR SAUNDERS 

MAY GORSUCH FERDINAND SCHAEFER 

BEULAH HAGER HELEN SOMMERS 

FAIRY HENDRICKS WILLARD TALLENTIRE 

iWILMA DAVIS HINE JOHN P. TREES 

BERTHA JASPER GERTRUDE WHELAN 

FRED JEFRY LUCILLE YOW 
FALL TERM OPENS MONDAY, SEPTEMBER 10, 1928 

1928-1929 Year Book on Request. Telephones Lin. 5313-5314 

Page Three Hundred and Seven 



ADVISORY BOARD 

MRS p ™ SCHURMANN, ARTHUR JORDAN 

ARTHUR W. MASON, FLORA LYONS 

Director PASQUALE MONTANI 

LENORA COFFIN FERDINAND SCHAEFER 

g2E£ F C SoD BLANCHE HARRINGTON, 

Secretary-Treasurer 

PUBLIC SCHOOL MUSIC FACULTY 

ELEANORA BEAUCHAMP FLORA LYONS 

FREDERICK BARKER ARTHUR MASON 

LENORA COFFIN WALTER REULEAUX 

WILLARD TALLENTIRE 

» 

* 






BUILT FOR THE AGES 






§>«- 



a 



IN supplying the Indiana Limestone 
for the beautiful new Arthur Jordan 
Memorial, this company has largely 
contributed to the rugged permanence 
of the building. 

No building material defies time and 
the elements better than Indiana Lime- 
stone. In all temperatures, in driving 
snow and blistering heat, this remark- 
able stone maintains its native beauty. 

We are proud of our share in the com- 
pletion of the new Butler, proud of our 
company and its modern facilities and 
proud of Indiana Limestone. 



^ 



S 



•iel» 



INDIANA OOLITIC 
LIMESTONE CO. 

BLOOMINGTON - INDIANA 

Page Three Hundred and Eight 



+~&~&~&~&~&~&~&"&"6~a~&»A~*~A~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~a~fi~&~ A ~i„ 



el 
















GRADUATION PORTRAITS 

Treasured Reminders of 
Schoolday Friendships 

Bachrach 

PHOTOGRAPHS OF DISTINCTION 

1008 Roosevelt BIdg. 



Teachers College of Indianapolis 

Established by Eliza A. Blaker, 1882 

Teachers College is a standard accredited 
Normal School. Two and four year courses 
in the training of Kindergarten and Elemen- 
tary Grade Teachers. 

Academic work, hand work, methods 
and principles of teaching, songs, games and 
opportunity for practice work is offered. 

The location in the capital city is of economic, cultural and educational 
advantage to students. 




Write for Catalogue 

ALICE CORBIN S1ES— President, 

Alabama and Twenty-third Streets 
INDIANAPOLIS 



Kindergarten 

Primary 

Intermediate 

Rural School 

Music 

Art 

Home Economics 



* 

• 
• 

• 
• 

» 

Bat 
I* 
I* 
I* 
I* 

lis 

* 

\t» 
I* 



Page 'Three Hundred and Nine 



%~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~&"&"*~&~n~&~&~s~*~&~&"&~&"6"&~&~'&'"&~& 



n 



Did You Ever Stop To Think — 

What Would You Do 
Without 

The Qollegian 



The Butler Collegian is YOUR Campus News- 
paper. It is the Connecting Link Between 
the "OLD GRADS" and those GOOD 
OLD COLLEGE DAYS. 

Read the Collegian 

Send In Your Subscription Now! 

Collegian, Circulation Mgr. Butler University, Indianapolis 

•I 

Page Three Hundred, and Ten 



U 



» 
* 

• 

• 
• 
• 

• 

I 

■s> 

I 

* 
* 






£[- U 

IRVINGTON'S HEADQUARTERS FOR 

Coal and Building Material 

IRVINGTON COAL AND LIME CO. 

5543 Bonna Avenue 
Phones — Irvington 4196 and 4197 

PROMPT SERVICE— COURTEOUS TREATMENT 

We Invite Consultation on all Matters Pertain- 
ing to Our Lines of Business 

FRED D. STILZ, General Manager 



W. FRANK JONES 

And a Complete Organization of 

COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPHERS 

Phone Main 5255 Jones Bldg.— 221 North East Street 

Ground Floor Studio 

INDIANAPOLIS 



For the Past Eight Years Official Photographers to the 
Department of Athletics at Butler College 

Drift Athletic Photographers 

PHOTOGRAPHS TELL THE STORY 

Page Three Hundred and Eleven 



\» 



^•""A"^^^^^ 






• 



£6 1 



FIRST 

In the morning 

THE INDIANAPOLIS STAR 

With a News Service 
Second to None. 

In addition these STAR writers 

Arthur Brisbane O.O. Mclntyre 

Dorothy Dix Glenn Frank 

Anna Nicholas "Bugs"Baer 

Mary Bostwick Kate Milner Rabb 



• 



Everett C. Watkins R. L. Barnum 

Laura A. Smith M. S. Rukeyser 



Jho 



ROGER BEAN, by Chick Jackson 
The Star's own Comic Strip Artist 



Phone Want Ads 



Page Three Hundred and Twelve 






* 



MAPLE ROAD STATE BANK 

ILLINOIS AT 38th STREET 

THE BANK THAT SOLICITS, PROTECTS AND 
APPRECIATES YOUR ACCOUNT 

OFFICERS 

K. T. BROCK— President DEAN BARRETT— Cashier 

JOHN W. PULLEN— Vice-President MARY C. BARRETT— Assistant Cashier 

DIRECTORS 
FRED M. SCHAD 
« . . - Grocer 

Capital, D O TAYLOR 

Grocer 

Surplus and °- E ' s ™ KAMP Resources 

Undivided * E * T ££$"°" Over 

Profits w C BSt FELD $200,000.00 
$30,500.00 K MS" 

^ ' JOHN W. PULLEN 

Banker 

We Are Large Enough to Insure Safety and Small Enough 

to Know You Personally 

OUR SERVICE 

COMMERCIAL BANKING INSURANCE OF ALL KINDS 

SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 4% INVESTMENTS 

1st MORTGAGE REAL ESTATE BONDS 6% NOTARY PUBLIC 

Phone Washington 4500 






TOMORROW'S CITIZENS 



« 

tt 

If all those attending Indiana's schools and colleges were gathered in 
one place it would make a city of more than seven hundred thousand souls. 

Famous for its mines and mills, its farms and factories, the state has 
not neglected the welfare of its future citizens while building up its 
industries. 

As education develops it calls for better facilities for communication. 
The telephone, itself the product of many scientific minds, is used most 
widely where education is most general. 

Every year hundreds of graduates from High Schools, Colleges and 
Universities enter the service of the Bell System, devoting their energy 
and applying their ability to its improvements and extension. 




^T^ 



INDIANA BELL TELEPHONE CO. 

Page Three Hundred and Thirteen 



HR^^^^fl^jg^A^^JB^AH^^ 



CHARACTER 




". . . FOR the people ..." 

The words of that great American 
remain with us today ... a simple, 
sincere statement, reflecting the un- 
selfish character of the man. 

"... FOR the people . . ." 

The policy of The Indianapolis News 
is nowhere more clearly outlined. 

Honesty, fearlessness, unselfish pub- 
lic service and understanding are 
among the outstanding characteris- 
tics that have made The Indianapo- 
lis News one of America's truly 
great NEWS papers. 



The Indianapolis News 

Serving This Community 
For the Last Fifty-eightYears 



16 



Page Three Hundred and Fourteen 



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Spink Arms Hotel 

INDIANAPOLIS' NEWEST AND FINEST HOTEL 
ASBOLUTELY FIREPROOF 



Transient Rates $2.50 Per Day and Up 
410 North Meridian — Main 5803 

We are devoting our greatest efforts toward 
making the SPINK ARMS the rendezvous for 
all special luncheon and dinner parties, club 
and fraternal dances, in fact, the sort of 
hostelry where personal service rules 
throughout. 

Furnished and Unfurnished Kitchenette Apartments 
W. A. HOLT, Proprietor 



Compliments of 

IRVINGTON COFFEE CO. 

5446 East Washington Street Irv. 1074 



Compliments of 

MARION COUNTY CONSTRUCTION 
COMPANY 



* 
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4* 

* 

• 

• 
• 

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* 

* 
* 



BREAKFAST LUNCH DINNER 

JOHNSON'S BAKERY & CAFETERIA 

"SERVICE OF THE BETTER KIND" 

5528-30 East Washington Street I rv . 1888 



Page Three Hundred and Fifteen 



? 



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The Pulitzer Prize in Journalism 

is awarded to 




BOYD GURLEY, 

Editor of 

The Indianapolis Times 



The 

Indianapolis 

Times 



The citation: 

"The prize for the most disinterested 
and meritorious public service rendered 
by an American newspaper during the 
year, a gold medal costing $500.00, is 
awarded to The Indianapolis Times for its 
work in exposing political corruption in 
Indiana, prosecuting the guilty and bring- 
ing about a more wholesome state of 
affairs in civil government." 

This is the most coveted prize in the 
newspaper world. 



THE TIMES OF TODAY is a complete, modern 
daily newspaper containing all the news, concisely and 
impartially told, and many exclusive features. 

THE TIMES OF TODAY also offers 
GUARANTEED HOME DELIVERY SERVICE 
Through nearly one thousand boy carriers. 

Know What is Happening Every Day By Reading 

The Indianapolis Times 

A SCRIPPS-HOWARD NEWSPAPER 

Indiana's Fastest Growing Daily Newspaper 

Page Three Hundred and Sixteen 










I* 
i 



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Irvington State Bank 

Affiliated With 

3Fldd|? r ^atringa and ®ruat Company 

INDIANAPOLIS 



LARGEST TRUST COMPANY IN INDIANA 
MEMBER FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM 



EXCELSIOR LAUNDRY 

840-848 North New Jersey Street 

BRANCH OFFICES 
907 Ft. Wayne Avenue 224 North Alabama Street 

Phone— MAin 3180 INDIANAPOLIS 

PENNANT SNOWDRIFT 

and Other Fancy Table Syrups 

Made by 

UNION STARCH REFINING CO., Columbus, Ind. 

SOLD BY ALL GROCERS 

Page Three Hundred and Seventeen 






itm i i pi ~iinw—TiririTire rir - — iurm n — ■inn ii i" r ' —-.—■--. ■.■.■■■. r rrr ^^. tri -... 11|1ririn1ntM .. 






WE PRINT 



4 



The Butler Collegian 









4 

MAGAZINES PERIODICALS 






NEWSPAPERS OFFICE FORMS 

HOUSE ORGANS DIRECT ADVERTISING 



O(3 a ^^p^ = 0D 



"SERVICE IS THE THING" 



9(3^^^=5)0 



The Mail Press 

312 East Market Street 

INDIANAPOLIS 

Page Three Hundred and Eighteen 



4M>. it«w-ti-« 



*~&~&~*~&~&~&~&~&"&~6~&~&~&~&~&~A~&~&~a~&~&~&~&~&~&~&~to~0 









DURING COLLEGE DAYS AND AFTERWARDS— 

KINGAN'S 

"RELIABLE" HAMS AND BACON 

Our "Reliable" Hams and Bacons are made from choice corn-fed hogs. 
After they are selected and trimmed, they are cured slowly by a special 
mild-cure formula which insures mildness, sweetness and an unusual deli- 
cate flavor. When fully cured, they are carefully smoked with hard-wood 
smoke which gives them a rich brown color and an appetizing smoked taste. 
You'll find a richness of flavor, tenderness, sweetness and mildness in 
Kingan's Hams and Bacon not found in any others. 
Choose them during your college days and in the days that come after 

KING AN & CO. 



Main Plant 



PORK AND BEEF PACKERS 

Indianapolis, Ind. 







SmMvwF\ 


lg 



Educational Activities Center at 

THE CLAYPOOL 

The Riley Room is instinctively chosen for 
university social functions 



Page Three Hundred and Nineteen 



*~fMK.tMMMMI~* »*•»- 



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Terre Haute, Indianapolis & Eastern 
Traction Company 







Trains Every Hour for EASTERN, WESTERN 
and NORTHWESTERN Indiana 



urn miiNinr 



Connects with Electric Lines at Indianapolis for points 
in Indiana, Ohio, Michigan and Kentucky 



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THROUGH SERVICE TO DAYTON, OHIO 

Connecting at Dayton for Springfield, Columbus, 
Lima and Toledo, Ohio, and Detroit, Mich. 



imiiii:ni niiimiiilillilllllllll muiimin 



SAVE TIME AND MONEY 

Travel the "Electric Way" 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty 



^1-a-a -ft-#-ft-ft^- , -&-&-&-&-* 



Polk 



dairy products have been leaders in Indianapolis for more than 35 years. 
They are the choice in discriminating homes because of their unsurpassed 
purity and wholesomeness. Ask for Polk's Best Milk at your favorite 
fountain, or order Polk's Creamed Cottage Cheese Frisco Style as a relish 
with your lunch. Insist on POLK'S for the BEST! 



POLK SANITARY MILK CO. 



FOR A HEALTHY BODY AND 

AN ACTIVE MIND 

Eat 

BALLARD ICE CREAM 

"None Better" 
VOICE TRAINING 

MRS. NELLIE S. JACKSON 



TALBOT 0366 



For "WELLMADE" Candies, See WILLIAMSON First 

Prompt Service Courteous Treatment 

HOMER J. WILLIAMSON, Inc. 

Call Main 1490 541 North East Street 

INDIANAPOLIS 

TEACHERS' COOPERATIVE EMPLOYMENT BUREAU 

HOMER L. COOK, Mgr. and HOMER L. COOK AGENCY 

720 and 721 State Life Building 

Write for contracts. By enrolling with me, you are appointed an assistant. You can 
make some money easy and with little effort. — SEE ME AT ONCE! 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-one 






MMMI 



~*~&~*~*~*~*~&~*~&~&~B~A~frB^~&~k~A~i~&~&~i~*~*~i~l^+ 



Butler Moves North! 

During the coming year, the transition from college to university is to 
be made. Alumni — You who are proud of the progress Butler has made — 
See the record of this transition in the 

1929 DRIFT 

($3.50 the Copy) 

The 1929 Drift, combining retrospection with prophecy, will commem- 
orate the Butler of the past and foresee the Butler of the future. 

The section devoted to old Irvington will arouse fond memories 

Views of the new buildings and Campus at Fairview will cause a thrill of 
pride. 

The Number of Copies is Limited — 
Order Yours Today! 



1929 DRIFT, BUTLER UNIVERSITY, 
INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA. 



Reserve for me copies of the 1929 Drift, for which I enclose $.. 



Address .. 
Page Three Hundred and Twenty-two 



I 



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1887 41 YEARS' SERVICE 1928 

THE RAILROADMEN'S 
BUILDING & SAVINGS ASSOCIATION 

21-23 Virginia Avenue 

An Indianapolis Booster for Home Ownership 

ASSETS OVER FIFTY MILLIONS 







VIRGINIA SWEET GRILLE 

Breakfasts, Luncheons and Dinners Fixed Prices 

Also a la Carte 

31-33-35 EAST MARYLAND STREET 



c \0dori£ss Dry Cleaning 

Miracleaning is a dry cleaning process which is different — Miracleaned 
clothing stays clean longer and is returned free from cleaning odor. The 
prices for Miracleaning are no higher. 

What does this mean to you? 

gown [aundry and £)ry (leaning (o. 

CHerry 1923 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-three 



0»i„i»i„i~Q»*»i~i~i~ft~Q~v~i„i^~*~*~i~*».i~& »-»-•-* 



Up 

I ATrust Company \l 









QUALIFIED BY 

35 YEARS 9 EXPERIENCE 

it 



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£T\ RACTICALLY every kind of Trust problems that may arise has 
/ been met and solved by this Company during its thirty-five years' 
experience. We have handled hundreds of estates. The total 
assets of the estates now being administered by this leading Company are 
over Thirty Millions of Dollars. We have repeatedly served our customers 
and friends in other cities as well as those living in Indianapolis. 

We cordially invite individuals and corporations, regardless of resi- 
dence, who require trust service, to correspond with the President or other 
officers of this Company. 



ARTHUR V. BROWN President ALAN A. RITCHIE Ass't Secretary 

JOHN E. REED Vice-President J. FLOYD KING Ass't Treasurer 

MERLIN M. DUNBAR RICHARD A. KURTZ. . .Ass't Secretary 

Vice-President and Tax Officer EVERETT E. LETT ... .Ass't Secretary 

HARRY P. McNUTT Treasurer GEORGE A. BUSKIRK Trust Officer 

ALFRED F. GAUDING Secretary CHARLES N. FULTZ, Ass't Trust Officer 

CORNELIUS O. ALIG.. Ass't Treasurer CHARLES T. BLIZZARD Auditor 



iKisteiJ 



The Union Trust Company 

OF INDIANAPOLIS 
The Leading Trust Company of Indiana 

INDIANAPOLIS, INDIANA 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-four 



■V< 



4 









THE ELECTRIC SHOE REPAIR 

286 W. 40th F. E. Davis 

ASPERGER & GERHARDT 

Designers and Builders of Quality 

CEMETERY MEMORIALS 

3405 Boulevard Place Talbot 4300 

The Shop of 

MAXWELL C. LANG 

312 Kahn Building Indianapolis, Indiana 



-WRITE FOR STYLE SHEET 
CUPS AND TROPHIES 



SURETY BONDS Telephones 

CASUALTY INSURANCE Lincoln 7505-7506 



INSURANCE OF EVERY KIND 

605 Fletcher Savings & Trust Building 
INDIANAPOLIS 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-five 



CLEAN STORE CLEAN MERCHANDISE 

FRESH CANDY FRESH CIGARS 

Percifield Drug Store 

Wash 5395 3965 Blvd. Place 



OTTINGER & DAVIS 

GROCERIES AND MEATS 

Wash. 1318 3062 Blvd. Place 

Wash. 1319 4 Deliveries Daily 






MAKER OF THE MOST BEAUTIFUL, FRATERNITY RING, THE SANTA MARIA, 
PATENTED APRIL, 10th, 1028 

P 

i 

i 






+~&~&~A^~*~&~&"*~*"A~A~*~*~&~A~&~*~*~*~*~&~&~*~*~*~*»&~4 



DREXEL 0614 FINISHING PLANT 

1120-22-24 Prospect Street 



HAROLD IRVING PLATT - Head Artist 



Piatt Studios 



"PHOTOGRAPHS OF PERSONALITY" 



Specialists in Bridal, Theatrical and Home Portraits. If you desire 
unique portraits call us. Reasonable prices. Our artists at your service 
either during day or evening. Samples gladly shown in your home on 
request. No obligation. School portraits our specialty. 



INDIANA'S LEADING STUDIOS 

LARGEST FINISHING PLANT IN MIDDLE WEST 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-six 



Phones: Irvington 2800, 2801, 2802 



STAPLE AND FANCY GROCERIES, FINE MEATS 



SERVICE 



5524 East Washington Street 

Indianapolis, Indiana 



QUALITY 



BUTLER BUYS 

Gym Chairs Classroom Furniture Office Equipment 

From Her Friends and Fellow Townsmen 



KIGER & CO. 

ALL SCHOOL EQUIPMENT 



113 S. Penns 



OUR PRESCRIPTION DEPARTMENT IS COMPLETE 
A Registered Pharmacist in Charge at All Times 

IRVINGTON 0140 



Most Famili. 



Irvington Know This Number 



When You Need Anything Which a High Class Drug Store Should Carry 
— Just Use the Telephone and Have Service at Your Door 

MERRILL'S PHARMACY 

THE STUDENTS' HEADQUARTERS 

East Washington Street at Ritter Avenue 

INSURANCE REAL ESTATE 



GEORGE W. RUSSELL 



| rv . 1212 5450 East Washington St. INDIANAPOLIS, IND. 

RENTALS LOANS 




MUSICAL MERCHANDISE OF QUALITY 



BAND AND ORCHESTRA INSTRUMENTS 

STANDARD SHEET MUSIC, BOOKS, STUDIES, ETC. 

ORTHOPHONIC VICTROLAS, RECORDS, ACCESSORIES 

HUME-MANSUR BLDG 



27 EAST OHIO STREET 



INDIANAPOLIS 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-seven 






SWISS CLEANERS 

1120 N. Illinois St. 

JOHN E. SPIEGEL 

INSURANCE 






"Speak to Spiegel" 

409 PYTHIAN BUILDING PHONE LINCOLN 2572 

IT PAID 

THAT'S WHAT SIR WALTER RALEIGH SAID TO THE BOYS GATHERED 
ABOUT THE FRATERNITY GRATE FIRE THE EVENING AFTER HE HAD 
SPREAD OUT HIS BEST COAT FOR QUEEN ELIZABETH TO CROSS A 
SLOPPY STREET. 

WALT ADMITTED SHE MESSED UP HIS NEW KUPPENHEIMER, BUT HE 
MADE QUITE A HIT ON THE QUEEN AND SHE THREW A LOT OF FA- 
VORS HIS WAY, INCLUDING THE STATE DANCE. 

IT'LL PAY 

TO MESS UP THE OLD POCKET BOOK BUYING A SHADOW-ART POR- 
TRAIT TO MAKE A HIT WITH THE QUEEN (OR "HIM"— KINGS JUST 
AREN'T NOW DAYS) 

SHADOW-ART PORTRAITURE 

(HILLARY G. BAILEY) 
1909 North Pennsylvania Indianapolis 



WERBE & MIESSEN, Inc. 

OPTOMETRISTS 

A. G. Miessen "A HOUSE OF SERVICE" Waldo E. Stein 

16 North Pennsylvania Street Phone, Main 0435 



FOR ANY GATHERING Teas to Formals SERVE 

VELVET — The Delicious Ice Cream 
JESSUP & ANTRIM ICE CREAM CO. 

Ma. 5170 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-eight 



*~^*~fi~*»*~ti~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~*~%~*~*~*~*~*"% 






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Established 
1859 




The Mitchells have 

been printing over 

Fifty Years 



OMPLETE Service, Book Making in its en- 
tirety. Editorial, typesetting, book plates, 
printing and binding — under one roof and 
one supervision. 



During the past sixty-nine years of book manu- 
facturing, we have produced many Law Books, 
Fiction, Genealogies, School and Text Books, 
Brochures, Plays, volumes of Poetry, Private and 
De Luxe Editions, Histories, Library Sets, etc. 

Special department for University, College and 
School Annuals, Handbooks, Publications, etc. 
Superfinish book covers, the beautifully grained, 
highly embossed and artistically colored line of 
superb covers. 



Wm. (^Mitchell Printing Qo. 

Edition Printers and Binders 

GREENFIELD, INDIANA 



Estimates, 
| Dummies, Etc., on 
| Request 




The 
Plant 

Complete 



THIS VOLUME FROM THE "OLD SWIMMIN' HOLE PRESS 
finiiHii illinium iimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiim i minimi 



hi i minim it iiiimir 

Page Three Hundred and Twenty-nine 






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^TtEMINISCENCE^? 








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Memory brightens o'er the past, 

As when the sun concealed 
Behind some cloud that near as hangs'} 

Shines on a distant field. 

Perhaps it is well that human nature" 
deplores the present and glorifies the' 
past. In idle moments it is comforting 
to permit the mind to shine back on 
distant fields of pleasant experiences 






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Thus, this memory book will serve you 
and prove the source of real future 
pleasure. For Stafford combines these 
elements with the artistry, the quality ; 
and the workmanship which entitle it, i 
to bear the phrase . . . 






* 




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Engraved by Stafford 

STAFFORD 

ENGRAVING COMPANY 1 

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The cover for 
this annual 
was created by 

The DAVID J. 

MOLLOY CO. 

2857 N. Western Avenue 
Chicago, Illinois 



(£>very Molloy Made 

Cover bears this 

trade mark on the 

bach lid. 






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Pa#e T7u-f<? Hundred and Thirty-one 









ADVERTISERS' INDEX 






4 
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PAGE 

ALUMNAL QUARTERLY .... 302 

Asperger & Gerhardt 325 

Baehraeh 309 

Bailey, Hillary 328 

Ballard Ice Cream Company . . . 321 
BUTLER UNIVERSITY SUM- 
MER SCHOOL 303 

Claypool Hotel 319 

COLLEGIAN 310 

Cook, Homer L 321 

Crown Laundry 323 

Dirks Grocery 327 

DRIFT, 1929 322 

Electric Shoe Repair 325 

Excelsior Laundry 317 

Fuller-Ryde Music Company . . 327 
HERRON ART INSTITUTE, 

John 306 

Indiana Bell Telephone Company 313 
INDIANA COLLEGE OF 

MUSIC AND FINE ARTS . . 307 
INDIANA LAW SCHOOL .... 305 

INDIANAPOLIS NEWS 314 

INDIANA OOLITIC LIME- 
STONE COMPANY 308 

INDIANAPOLIS STAR 312 

INDIANAPOLIS TIMES .... 316 
Irvington Coal and Lime Com- 
pany 311 

Irvington Coffee Company .... 315 

Irvington State Bank 317 

Jackson, Mrs. Nellie 321 

Jessup & Antrim Ice Cream 

Company 328 

Johnson's Cafeteria 315 

Jones, W. Frank 311 



PAGE 

Kiger & Companj^ 327 

Kingan & Company 319 

Lang, Maxwell C 325 

MAIL PRESS 318 

Maple Road State Bank 313 

Marion County Construction 

Company 315 

Merrill Pharmacy 327 

METROPOLITAN SCHOOL 

OF MUSIC 304 

MITCHELL PRINTING COM- 
PANY, WILLIAM 302, 329 

MOLLOY COMPANY, THE 

DAVID J 331 

Ottinger & Davis 325 

Percifield Drug Store 325 

PLATT STUDIOS 326 

Polk Sanitary Milk Company . . 321 
Railroadmen 's Building and Sav- 
ings Association 323 

Russell, George W 327 

Spiegal, John E 328 

Spink Arms Hotel 315 

STAFFORD ENGRAVING 

COMPANY 330 

Swiss Cleaners 328 

Teachers College of Indianapolis 309 
T. H. I. & E. TRACTION 

COMPANY 320 

Union Starch Refining Company 317 
UNION TRUST COMPANY .. 324 

Virginia Sweet Grille 323 

Werbe & Miessen 328 

Willard, A. L 325 

Williamson, Homer J 321 



Page Three Hundred and Thirty-two 









\ 



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«* 



* 
* 



GENERAL INDEX 



PAGE 

ADVERTISEMENTS 301 

AFFILIATIONS 23 

Aley, Dr. Robert A 12 

Art Institute, John Herron . . . .24-26 

ARTS AND SCIENCES 11 

ATHLETICS 91 

Baseball 119 

Basketball Ill 

Beauty 201 

Broadcasting, W. F. B. M 219 

Brown, Hilton U 2 

Butler University School of 
Physical E d u c a t io n and 

Athletics 95 

C AMPUSTRY 209-229 

Chadd, Archie 112 

Clark, George "Potsy" 92 

Class Scrap 217 

Clubs 163 

Coaching Staff 93 

COLLEGE OF RELIGION ... 19 

Collier, Harrison "Red" 98 

Cornerstone Laying 215 

Dramatics and Debating 191 

Directors, Board of 1 

Debating, Dramatics and 191 

Faculty, Butler University 13-18 

Faculty, College of Religion ... 21 
Faculty, Indiana School of Music 28 

Faculty, Law School 285 

Facultv, Metropolitan School of 

Music 32 

Fairview 223, 226 

Fairview Follies 220-221 

Floyd, Walter 120 



PAGE 

Football 97 

FRATERNITIES 231 

Freshmen 81 

Holz, Harold 128 

Honoraries 153 

Homecoming Parade 222 

Indiana College of Music 27-29 

Indiana Law School 36-39, 283 

Indianapolis Teachers College 34-35 

Intra-Mural 139 

Juniors 59 

Junior Prom Queen 212 

Law 283 

Law Fraternities 295 

May Day 214 

Melting Pot Bazaar 218 

Men 231 

Metropolitan School of Music . . 31-33 

Minor Sports 135 

New Butler 224, 225 

Notre Dame Celebration 216 

Old and New Butler 5-10 

Phillips, Herman 132 

Publications 183 

Rohbach, Dean 284 

Schulemeyer, Louise 145 

Seniors 41 

Shover Nursery School 30 

Sophomores 75 

Sororities 253 

Track 127 

Wilson, "Tommy'' 136 

Women 253 

Women's Athletics 143 



I* 






Page Three Hundred and Tliirty-three 









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AN expression of gratitude is a fitting close to every ex- 
perience. The 1928 DRIFT is most grateful to all who 
assisted in compiling this book; to the Stafford Engrav- 
ing and Mitchell Printing Companies for their coopera- 
tion and service; to the staff members for their editorial 
aid; to Joseph Scheleen, Scott Waldon and Gerald Bow- 
man, who contributed to the athletic section; to Louise 
Eleanor Ross for her assistance in copy editing; and 
lastly but largely to the tireless efforts of 
the art staff in making this a 
DRIFT of, by and for 
Butler students. 



M^lf* £-8- 



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